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By From Staff Reports | August 11, 1994
Cargo handled at the port of Baltimore's public terminals increased 18.4 percent during the first half of the year, continuing to grow at a pace that would make this year the port's best since 1988.General cargo at the five state-owned terminals in Baltimore jumped from 2.68 million short tons handled in the first half of 1993 to 3.17 million short tons during the same period in 1994, according to a report yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration. A short ton is 2,000 pounds.Port officials predict the state-owned terminals will handle more than 6 million short tons of general cargo this year, compared to 6.2 million short tons in 1988.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 1997
The port of Baltimore's 18-month slump may be over.For the first half of 1997, total general cargo moving through the port's state-owned marine terminals increased 4.1 percent, from short tons to 3,053,856 short tons, port officials said yesterday.Cargo was down 8.8 percent during the corresponding period last year, reflecting the loss of major shipping lines in Baltimore and an overall decline in business at most North Atlantic ports.None of those lines has resumed service here and the port has been slow to lure any new carriers.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
Officials at the port of Baltimore are bracing for a "significant slowdown" in 1996 as revolutionary changes in the shipping industry intensify competition among East Coast ports. "The consensus is we're on the verge of a significant slowdown," Tay Yoshitani, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said yesterday after the release of 1995 cargo statistics. "That's obviously a concern to us." At the state's five public marine terminals, the volume of cargo rose slightly, from 6,320,792 short tons in 1994 to 6,332,836 short tons last year.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1997
General cargo moving through Maryland Port Administration terminals declined 7.4 percent last year, reflecting the loss of major shipping lines in Baltimore and an overall decline in business at North Atlantic ports.According to the MPA, cargo fell 468,000 short tons from 6.3 million short tons in 1995 to 5.7 million short tons in 1996. The loss came primarily in containers as Maersk Line and Naverias Inc. abandoned most of their service here during the past 18 months. The decline in business translated into less work for the longshoremen who load and unload the cargo and others such as bay pilots.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | November 10, 1994
Cargo handled by the port of Baltimore rose nearly 12 percent in this year's third quarter as the state-owned terminals stayed tTC on target for the best year since 1988.General cargo moving through the five public terminals in Baltimore increased to 1.53 million short tons in the most recent period from 1.37 million short tons in last year's third quarter, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration (MPA).The increase represented the ninth straight quarter of growth in cargo for the port of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Cargo moving through the port of Baltimore increased 3 percent for the second half of 1994 as the weak dollar continued to spark a growth in exports.At the state's five public marine terminals, cargo rose to 3,237,548 short tons, or 85,213 short tons more than during the comparable period last year, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday.A strong second quarter this year helped offset a slight loss in cargo during the first quarter. Exports have jumped more than 17 percent to 1,505,022 short tons.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Cargo handled by the port of Baltimore's public terminals dropped slightly during the first quarter of the year, and port officials cautioned that last year's significant growth would taper off.General cargo moving through the five marine terminals in Baltimore declined to 1,576,189 short tons, or less than 1 percent lower than the 1,588,854 short tons during the first three months of 1994, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration.The...
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Cargo handled by the Port of Baltimore rose nearly 17 percent last year -- its best showing since 1988.General cargo moving through the five public terminals in Baltimore jumped to 6.3 million short tons in 1994, or nearly 1 million more than in the previous year, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration.The increase represents the 10th straight quarter of cargo growth for the port, which has made a significant comeback after heavy volume losses in the 1980s and early 1990s.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
Cargo moving through the port of Baltimore increased 2.1 percent in the first nine months of 1995, putting the port on a pace to top 6 million tons for the second straight year.During the third quarter, the volume of cargo handled at the state's five public marine terminals dipped slightly, by 3,911 tons. But overall this year, it has risen to 4,779,428 short tons, compared with 4,682,335 short tons for the nine-month period in 1994.The port experienced a 17 percent growth in cargo in 1994.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1997
The port of Baltimore's 18-month slump may be over.For the first half of 1997, total general cargo moving through the port's state-owned marine terminals increased 4.1 percent, from short tons to 3,053,856 short tons, port officials said yesterday.Cargo was down 8.8 percent during the corresponding period last year, reflecting the loss of major shipping lines in Baltimore and an overall decline in business at most North Atlantic ports.None of those lines has resumed service here and the port has been slow to lure any new carriers.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
The volume of cargo moving through the port of Baltimore's public terminals dropped 11 percent during the second quarter, the most significant decline in years as the port suffered a huge cut in service by one of its largest steamship lines.The drop from a total of 1,665,745 short tons to 1,482,441 short tons -- the second straight quarterly decline this year -- was exacerbated by the fact that the port experienced a near-record second quarter in 1995.With the cutback by Maersk Line Inc., a down slide had been expected, though not quite so extensive.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
With declines in container traffic and automobile imports, the volume of cargo moving through the port of Baltimore's public terminals fell nearly 7 percent during the first quarter of the year.The drop from 1,574,736 short tons to 1,470,121 short tons was the first quarterly decline in nearly three years, and followed last year's near-record first quarter.While business at the Maryland's five public terminals has slowed considerably, the private terminals -- which largely handle bulk commodities, such as coal, grain and cement -- have been experiencing a strong surge.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
Officials at the port of Baltimore are bracing for a "significant slowdown" in 1996 as revolutionary changes in the shipping industry intensify competition among East Coast ports. "The consensus is we're on the verge of a significant slowdown," Tay Yoshitani, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said yesterday after the release of 1995 cargo statistics. "That's obviously a concern to us." At the state's five public marine terminals, the volume of cargo rose slightly, from 6,320,792 short tons in 1994 to 6,332,836 short tons last year.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1995
Cargo moving through the port of Baltimore increased 2.1 percent in the first nine months of 1995, putting the port on a pace to top 6 million tons for the second straight year.During the third quarter, the volume of cargo handled at the state's five public marine terminals dipped slightly, by 3,911 tons. But overall this year, it has risen to 4,779,428 short tons, compared with 4,682,335 short tons for the nine-month period in 1994.The port experienced a 17 percent growth in cargo in 1994.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1995
Cargo moving through the port of Baltimore increased 3 percent for the second half of 1994 as the weak dollar continued to spark a growth in exports.At the state's five public marine terminals, cargo rose to 3,237,548 short tons, or 85,213 short tons more than during the comparable period last year, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday.A strong second quarter this year helped offset a slight loss in cargo during the first quarter. Exports have jumped more than 17 percent to 1,505,022 short tons.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Cargo handled by the port of Baltimore's public terminals dropped slightly during the first quarter of the year, and port officials cautioned that last year's significant growth would taper off.General cargo moving through the five marine terminals in Baltimore declined to 1,576,189 short tons, or less than 1 percent lower than the 1,588,854 short tons during the first three months of 1994, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration.The...
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
The volume of cargo moving through the port of Baltimore's public terminals dropped 11 percent during the second quarter, the most significant decline in years as the port suffered a huge cut in service by one of its largest steamship lines.The drop from a total of 1,665,745 short tons to 1,482,441 short tons -- the second straight quarterly decline this year -- was exacerbated by the fact that the port experienced a near-record second quarter in 1995.With the cutback by Maersk Line Inc., a down slide had been expected, though not quite so extensive.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Cargo handled by the Port of Baltimore rose nearly 17 percent last year -- its best showing since 1988.General cargo moving through the five public terminals in Baltimore jumped to 6.3 million short tons in 1994, or nearly 1 million more than in the previous year, according to a report released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration.The increase represents the 10th straight quarter of cargo growth for the port, which has made a significant comeback after heavy volume losses in the 1980s and early 1990s.
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