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By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 23, 2005
Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in the world, consumed in coffee, tea and soft drinks by hundreds of millions of people to get started in the morning and as a pick-me-up during the day. That people like the jolt they get from caffeine is no secret, but what caffeine does in the brain has been unknown. Now Austrian researchers using brain imaging technology have discovered that caffeine perks up the part of the brain involved in short-term memory, which helps us focus attention on the tasks at hand.
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NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier and By Michael Collier,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
In answer to the question, "Why does one write poetry?", Wallace Stevens, one of America's great 20th-century poets, responded: "Because one is impelled to do so by a personal sensibility and also because one grows tired of the monotony of one's imagination." Since 1956, when his first book was chosen by W.H. Auden to win the coveted 1956 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize, John Ashbery, like Stevens, has used poetry to avoid the boredom of a sedentary imagination. It is typical and telling about modern poetry that both Stevens and Ashbery do not claim to write from "inspiration," though their sensibility impels them, but from monotony, tiredness and perhaps impatience with the status quo. In the service of his imagination, John Ashbery has published more than 20 volumes of poems, a collection of plays, a novel, essays and art criticism.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | May 23, 2007
Done." Andrew Engel has spent nearly 12 years in college, working gradually, steadily for the chance to utter that word. The moment came last week, when the University of Maryland, Baltimore County senior completed his final course requirements for a degree. Graduation, scheduled for tomorrow afternoon at 1st Mariner Arena, was still a week away, yet as Engel walked across the campus of emerald grass and boxy buildings, he allowed the joy of accomplishment to consume him. That way, the moment would be permanently etched in his long-term memory, instead of becoming a feeling he knew he had experienced but could not recall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2001
Rio music player offers a tuneful bang for your buck Rio's portable digital music players keep getting more sophisticated, and why not? The company has plenty of competition and is looking for ways to stay in front. Rio 800 64MB is targeted at business travelers, technical enthusiasts and athletes. The Rio's suggested price is set to drop to $249 this week. The device comes with 64 megabytes of memory, enough to hold about two hours of CD-quality music. Highly recommended: the durable travel case ($24.
NEWS
August 5, 2003
Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic, 66, a professor of neuroscience at Yale University whose pioneering research on brain and memory functions helped pave the way for understanding schizophrenia and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, died Thursday in New Haven, Conn. She died of complications from head and other injuries suffered two days earlier when she was struck by a car as she crossed a street in Hamden, Conn., said her husband, Dr. Pasko Rakic, a fellow Yale neuroscientist. Dr. Goldman-Rakic was the first researcher to chart the frontal lobe of the brain, which is responsible for personality, reasoning, planning, insight and other high-order cognitive functions.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 7, 1994
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. -- Two teams of scientists working to sort out how the brain works have found a specific gene needed for making memories. Without it, animals end up handicapped, unable to remember what happened just a short time ago.In three research papers to be published in today's issue of the scientific journal Cell, researchers at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island report that the gene called CREB must be working properly or...
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, For The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Here's a no-brainer for you: Your memory doesn't have to get worse with age. In fact, you can actually grow the short-term memory portion of your brain -- and possibly even stave off the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Or so says Dr. Majid Fotuhi, a Harvard- and Johns Hopkins-trained neurologist who has operated a brain center in Lutherville for the past two and a half years, and who this winter opened an even larger brain center in Columbia, a 6,000-square-foot facility on Charter Drive, behind Howard County General Hospital.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | May 23, 2007
Done." Andrew Engel has spent nearly 12 years in college, working gradually, steadily for the chance to utter that word. The moment came last week, when the University of Maryland, Baltimore County senior completed his final course requirements for a degree. Graduation, scheduled for tomorrow afternoon at 1st Mariner Arena, was still a week away, yet as Engel walked across the campus of emerald grass and boxy buildings, he allowed the joy of accomplishment to consume him. That way, the moment would be permanently etched in his long-term memory, instead of becoming a feeling he knew he had experienced but could not recall.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | June 13, 1996
A woman who became permanently disabled when a Boston surgeon removed fragments of her brain during elective eye surgery was awarded $5 million by a Superior Court jury, which also gave the woman's husband $1 million for loss of companionship with his wife of 26 years.The woman, Judith A. McEnaney, and her husband, John P. McEnaney, of Westford, Mass., declined to comment on the $6 million verdict returned Tuesday against Dr. Michael Joseph.Their attorney, Mark Regan, said the 45-year-old woman has permanently lost her short-term memory because of the surgical error made Nov. 21, 1990, at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK and RONALD KOTULAK,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 23, 2005
Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in the world, consumed in coffee, tea and soft drinks by hundreds of millions of people to get started in the morning and as a pick-me-up during the day. That people like the jolt they get from caffeine is no secret, but what caffeine does in the brain has been unknown. Now Austrian researchers using brain imaging technology have discovered that caffeine perks up the part of the brain involved in short-term memory, which helps us focus attention on the tasks at hand.
NEWS
August 5, 2003
Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic, 66, a professor of neuroscience at Yale University whose pioneering research on brain and memory functions helped pave the way for understanding schizophrenia and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, died Thursday in New Haven, Conn. She died of complications from head and other injuries suffered two days earlier when she was struck by a car as she crossed a street in Hamden, Conn., said her husband, Dr. Pasko Rakic, a fellow Yale neuroscientist. Dr. Goldman-Rakic was the first researcher to chart the frontal lobe of the brain, which is responsible for personality, reasoning, planning, insight and other high-order cognitive functions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier and By Michael Collier,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
In answer to the question, "Why does one write poetry?", Wallace Stevens, one of America's great 20th-century poets, responded: "Because one is impelled to do so by a personal sensibility and also because one grows tired of the monotony of one's imagination." Since 1956, when his first book was chosen by W.H. Auden to win the coveted 1956 Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize, John Ashbery, like Stevens, has used poetry to avoid the boredom of a sedentary imagination. It is typical and telling about modern poetry that both Stevens and Ashbery do not claim to write from "inspiration," though their sensibility impels them, but from monotony, tiredness and perhaps impatience with the status quo. In the service of his imagination, John Ashbery has published more than 20 volumes of poems, a collection of plays, a novel, essays and art criticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2001
Rio music player offers a tuneful bang for your buck Rio's portable digital music players keep getting more sophisticated, and why not? The company has plenty of competition and is looking for ways to stay in front. Rio 800 64MB is targeted at business travelers, technical enthusiasts and athletes. The Rio's suggested price is set to drop to $249 this week. The device comes with 64 megabytes of memory, enough to hold about two hours of CD-quality music. Highly recommended: the durable travel case ($24.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 7, 1994
COLD SPRING HARBOR, N.Y. -- Two teams of scientists working to sort out how the brain works have found a specific gene needed for making memories. Without it, animals end up handicapped, unable to remember what happened just a short time ago.In three research papers to be published in today's issue of the scientific journal Cell, researchers at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island report that the gene called CREB must be working properly or...
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | April 24, 2002
Loyola High lacrosse midfielder Daniel O'Hara, who was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center after suffering head and facial injuries in an April 13 car accident, is scheduled to be released from Kernan Hospital in Woodlawn today, his mother, Pat O'Hara, said last night. O'Hara was on a respirator for 12 hours after the accident. "Dan's gentle personality and good humor are intact," Pat O'Hara said of her son, who has suffered short-term memory loss. He will receive outpatient therapy from the Kennedy Krieger Institute.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 2, 1990
A new art gallery emphasizing the work of professional artists with disabilities will open in Washington this week with an exhibit featuring the works of artists from 50 states and the District of Columbia.The Very Special Arts Gallery will have a private reception for its opening show, "Art Across America," tomorrow from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. It will open its doors to the public beginning Tuesday.Representing Maryland in the exhibit is Baltimore artist Gerald Hawkes, who uses matchsticks to construct symbolic and utilitarian sculptures.
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