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NEWS
December 18, 1992
For all their resilience, families are complex and complicated, and nowhere are the fault lines more visible than when family matters come into contact with the judicial system.Maryland courts rarely give judges and administrative personnel the time they need or allow them a chance to develop expertise in family law. Moreover, anyone who has gone through the thorny process of getting a divorce in Maryland, or contested custody of a child, or even watched the process of setting support payments knows that domestic cases get painfully short shrift in a court system clogged with criminal cases that must get priority.
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NEWS
By Susan Peschin | April 14, 2014
This is getting old. Every time our nation has an opportunity to do something positive in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, we come up short. The latest example is the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the independent panel charged with developing guidelines on preventive care services for primary care clinicians and health systems. The task force came to the conclusion that there is not enough evidence to warrant population screening for cognitive impairment in older adults in America.
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NEWS
By TOM HORTON | January 21, 1995
What would the world be, once bereft,of wet and of wildness? Let them be left.-- Gerard Manley Hopkins,Poems, No. 56BRIDGEVILLE, Del. -- Along a wooded stream off busy U.S. 13, some major digging equipment of the local farm conservation district is rearranging the scenery in pickup truck-sized bites.At first glance, this appears to be business as usual: work on the drainage system that has enabled farming across the low, flat Delmarva Peninsula for centuries and straightened thousands of miles of streams, now more akin to ditches.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 23, 2012
Today's Board of Public Works meeting was about more than just big government contracts, it also became a lesson in big words. Maryland's Comptroller Peter Franchot kicked off the effort by whipping out "ratiocination," a fancier term for reasoning. The context: Franchot felt that the state was giving St. Mary's County the short shrift on school construction money. Neighboring Calvert and Charles -- represented by two of the state's most powerful senators -- won larger awards, he pointed out. Officials at the meeting struggled to explain the discrepancy, and Franchot dismissed their arguments as "ratiocination" after the fact.
NEWS
By Frances Fox Piven and Lorraine C. Minnite | April 28, 2010
This is a eulogy for ACORN as we knew it. Our premier anti-poverty organization has been forced into a massive reorganization, and its future is unclear. If we care about democracy, we should study the story of what happened to ACORN, or the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. It is true that in its rush to recruit people and build its organization, ACORN was sometimes sloppy and should have supervised its people more closely. But those faults could have been corrected and ACORN's singular contributions to our polity sustained.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 4, 2007
There's a funny premise at the core of Are We Done Yet? Too bad the movie doesn't do much with it. A remake of the 1948 Cary Grant comedy Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, the film stars Ice Cube as Nick Persons, a newlywed father of two and would-be magazine publisher who moves his family to a big fixer-upper house in the country. The plot gets them away from the dangers of the city and gives everyone space to breathe, but gives short shrift to all manner of comic possibilities. Are We Done Yet?
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 23, 2012
Today's Board of Public Works meeting was about more than just big government contracts, it also became a lesson in big words. Maryland's Comptroller Peter Franchot kicked off the effort by whipping out "ratiocination," a fancier term for reasoning. The context: Franchot felt that the state was giving St. Mary's County the short shrift on school construction money. Neighboring Calvert and Charles -- represented by two of the state's most powerful senators -- won larger awards, he pointed out. Officials at the meeting struggled to explain the discrepancy, and Franchot dismissed their arguments as "ratiocination" after the fact.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
NEWS
March 31, 2002
IF SHE HAD NO opposition, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend could coast to the Maryland governor's mansion without uttering a useful word on issues of importance to the voters. But she has at least one opponent, and she has begun giving her views, separating herself from positions taken by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Appropriately loyal to the man who ignited her public career eight years ago by making her his running mate, she must now show what she thinks. The end of political bystanding came with a rush last week when Republican Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. entered the governor's race.
NEWS
By Jason Judd | March 12, 2012
If our largest banks are the "one-percenters" of American capitalism, small business is our 99. And, just as our largest corporations are ruling the roost in Washington, so too do they rule in Annapolis. In fact, Maryland's politics have become so lopsided over the last decade that support for Maryland's small businesses has degenerated into a mere talking point - "backbone of our economy," "the engine of economic growth," etc. Here's Exhibit A. In spite of all the talk from big business groups about taxes and regulation in Maryland, the top issue for small businesses is lending.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Two recent news articles lead me to question the values of both our society and The Sun. The first was the announcement of the obscene amount of money Ravens defensive lineman Haloti Ngata is being paid - $61 million - to play football through 2015. There is no other word for it at a time when teachers, police and firefighters - the people who actually affect other people's lives - are being laid off or underpaid, and when elected leaders at all levels don't earn anywhere near the amount athletes get. What contribution to society does an athlete make that deserves such an outrageous sum of money?
NEWS
By Frances Fox Piven and Lorraine C. Minnite | April 28, 2010
This is a eulogy for ACORN as we knew it. Our premier anti-poverty organization has been forced into a massive reorganization, and its future is unclear. If we care about democracy, we should study the story of what happened to ACORN, or the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now. It is true that in its rush to recruit people and build its organization, ACORN was sometimes sloppy and should have supervised its people more closely. But those faults could have been corrected and ACORN's singular contributions to our polity sustained.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser Getting there | March 22, 2010
I t didn't get much media attention outside bicycle-enthusiast circles, but last week, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood made what might have been one of the most important policy shifts to come out of his department in decades. Upending years of federal transportation policy, LaHood declared that henceforth bicycles and the human foot would be elevated to parity with motor vehicles. Calling the new policy "a sea change," LaHood announced: "People across America who value bicycling should have a voice when it comes to transportation planning.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- A crossing signal at a downtown intersection doesn't give pedestrians enough time to cross the street. THE BACKSTORY -- Emily Hiller lives in Little Italy and walks along Fayette Street when visiting downtown. She keeps a brisk pace, unless one of her children tags along, but even when solo she complains that crossing President Street is a torturous task. The pedestrian signal, Hiller says, does not leave enough time to traverse seven lanes of traffic and a wide median strip.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 4, 2007
There's a funny premise at the core of Are We Done Yet? Too bad the movie doesn't do much with it. A remake of the 1948 Cary Grant comedy Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, the film stars Ice Cube as Nick Persons, a newlywed father of two and would-be magazine publisher who moves his family to a big fixer-upper house in the country. The plot gets them away from the dangers of the city and gives everyone space to breathe, but gives short shrift to all manner of comic possibilities. Are We Done Yet?
NEWS
April 12, 1994
As expressed in this space previously, the Columbia Association suffers from a major-league identity crisis. Often, Columbia representatives seem to like it that way, casting CA in whatever light seems most convenient at the moment. CA is the ginsu knife of homeowner associations: It's a private business. It's a non-profit. It's a government body. It's a civic association.In fairness, there does seem to be some genuine concern about defining Columbia and encouraging greater resident participation in its affairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Raphael and By Ray Raphael,Special to the Sun | May 29, 2005
1776 By David McCullough. Simon & Schuster, 386 pages, $32. Opening Words "On the afternoon of Thursday, October 26, 1775, His Royal Majesty George III, King of England, rode in royal splendor from St. James Palace to the Palace of Westminster, there to address the opening of Parliament on the increasingly distressing issue of war in America." 1776, by David McCullough In Revolutionary days, when people objected to decisions reached in official chambers, they resolved issues on their own "out-of-chambers," as they said at the time.
FEATURES
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2002
Instead of gasping its last breath, rock music proved startlingly vital in 2002, the Year of the Scruffy Man. With a load of lo-fi histrionics, garage rockers such as the Strokes, the Hives and the Vines landed prominent display space in pop culture. There were magazine covers, primetime TV, high-profile concert tours. All were lauded as possible rock 'n' roll redeemers. And all of them, as it happens, are men. Then there are bands like the Donnas and Sahara Hotnights, girl punks who can rock with the best of the boys but don't get the same kind of attention.
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