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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
The butcher laughed when I called to order beef short ribs. I wasn't the only one asking. Being a veteran of the meat wars, he could well recall when this meat cut was so unpopular that it wasn't worth wrapping and putting on the shelves. How things have changed. You can't look at an American restaurant menu without seeing some version of braised short ribs. Earlier this year, Bon Appetit magazine named the ribs the dish of the year. The magazine praised the "meaty, rich and meltingly tender" quality of short ribs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Some occasions require a touch of romance. Nothing too formal or over the top - no scattered rose petals or strolling violins. Just good, interesting food served capably in a special setting. Baldwin's Station in historic Sykesville is just the place. Housed in a renovated 19th-century train station on the Old Main Line, the restaurant straddles the border of Howard and Carroll counties. Baldwin's Station's current incarnation opened in 1997. Owner Stewart Dearie is a restaurant veteran who managed the Conservatory at the Peabody Hotel and Antrim 1844 in Taneytown.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 24, 2006
Irish Charities of Maryland, which also sponsors the Baltimore Irish Festival at Timonium Fairgrounds, recently held a "What's in Your Guinness?" recipe contest to find the tastiest ways to use the Irish beer Guinness in food. Six restaurants entered; this hearty dish from Jeffrey Smith, chef/owner and operator of the Chameleon Cafe in Lauraville, won top honors. BRAISED SHORT RIBS WITH VEAL STOCK GUINNESS REDUCTION Serves 6 to 7 1/2 cup flour salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 2 pounds beef short ribs 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 pound onions, chopped 8 ounces carrots, chopped 3 cups veal stock 4 garlic cloves 1 bay leaf 4 peppercorns 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 can Guinness beer 1/4 cup each, diced: turnips, carrots, rutabaga, parsnips Season flour with salt and pepper.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 6, 2012
The food offerings at the 41st annual lighting of Mount Vernon's Washington Monument on Thursday will be more diverse than ever, according to Michael Evitts of the Downtown Partnership, one of the event's organizers. Clustered in a holiday village in the west park of Mount Vernon Square, the vendors will be selling items that include sunchoke soup, fried Oreos, short ribs, tacos, sliders, scallops, falafel, crepes, gumbo and "more cider than you can shake a stick at," Evitts said.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | August 14, 1991
A veal recipe with a subtle Oriental flavor won the recent 1991 Favorite Veal Recipe Contest, sponsored by the American Veal Association. Sylvia Schmitt of Phoenix, Ariz. received first prize with her recipe for five-spiced glazed veal short ribs. Veal riblets or country-style ribs can be substituted for the short ribs.Five-Spice Glazed VealShort RibsL 3 pounds veal short ribs, veal riblets or country-style ribs1 tablespoon soy sauce2 teaspoons tomato paste1 teaspoon honey1 teaspoon minced garlic2 tablespoons vegetable oil3/4 cup chicken broth1/3 cup sherry2 tablespoons minced onion1/4 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powderSesame seedsTrim excess fat from veal short ribs if necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 6, 2012
The food offerings at the 41st annual lighting of Mount Vernon's Washington Monument on Thursday will be more diverse than ever, according to Michael Evitts of the Downtown Partnership, one of the event's organizers. Clustered in a holiday village in the west park of Mount Vernon Square, the vendors will be selling items that include sunchoke soup, fried Oreos, short ribs, tacos, sliders, scallops, falafel, crepes, gumbo and "more cider than you can shake a stick at," Evitts said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Mr Rain's Fun House is throwing a Repeal Day Dinner on Sunday night. The event , which celebrates the repeal of Prohibition on Dec. 5, 1933, includes a $65 five-course seated dinner by Chef Bill Buszinski, live jazz music and dancing. Sunday night, of course, is only Dec. 4, so guests are encouraged to stay until midnight for a Champagne toast. The idea for the Repeal Party came from Perez Klebahn, Mr. Rain's beverage director, who had celebrated the Dec. 5 anniversary with his friends for years.
FEATURES
By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 9, 2000
You've tried East Coast chowders, Louisiana gumbos and French bouillabaisse. It's time you tried caldo. The brothy concoction has long been a comfort food in Hispanic homes and a menu staple at many Mexican restaurants. But it remains a dish many people haven't noticed or understood. If sopa is soup, just what is caldo? Literally, caldo translates as broth. But a steaming bowl of caldo is much more. Caldo is broth, meat and a few vegetables, says Jesse Del Angel, manager of the Nuevo Leon restaurant in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Some occasions require a touch of romance. Nothing too formal or over the top - no scattered rose petals or strolling violins. Just good, interesting food served capably in a special setting. Baldwin's Station in historic Sykesville is just the place. Housed in a renovated 19th-century train station on the Old Main Line, the restaurant straddles the border of Howard and Carroll counties. Baldwin's Station's current incarnation opened in 1997. Owner Stewart Dearie is a restaurant veteran who managed the Conservatory at the Peabody Hotel and Antrim 1844 in Taneytown.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 14, 2009
I was on vacation last week, so I was delighted when John Lindner, a frequent contributor to Dining@Large (baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge), volunteered his list of Top 10 Signs You're a Foodie. Needless to say, it sparked some outraged comments: 1 You remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard that Martick's closed. 2 You know that basmati is not the capital of India. 3 Your meal is ruined when you're served from your left (or right -- the point is, darn it, it matters)
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | October 8, 2012
Southworth reflects: I chose this particular dish because I love the smell of slow-cooking meat on a brisk fall day. The slow cooking breaks down the meat to make it melt in your mouth. And I just love blue cheese (Gorgonzola) with beef; the flavors burst in your mouth. The Calvados Sidecar pairs nicely with the meal, especially because of the fall-evoking apple flavor of the brandy. Cab Braised Short Rib Ingredients: Short Rib: •    4 pounds beef short ribs •    1 tablespoon fresh rosemary •    1 tablespoon fresh thyme •    1 tablespoon kosher salt •    1 tablespoon black salt •    ¼ cup vegetable oil •    1 750-milliliter cabernet sauvignon •    1 tablespoon butter •    1 tablespoon all-purpose flour Polenta: •    5 cups chicken stock •    1 ¾ cups polenta •    ¾ cup crumbled Gorgonzola •    ¿ cup heavy cream Gremolata: •    ¼ cup chopped parsley •    3 tablespoons grated lemon zest •    2 cloves garlic, minced •    2 tablespoons chopped rosemary •    2 tablespoons chopped thyme Directions: Mix rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper and sprinkle over ribs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Mr Rain's Fun House is throwing a Repeal Day Dinner on Sunday night. The event , which celebrates the repeal of Prohibition on Dec. 5, 1933, includes a $65 five-course seated dinner by Chef Bill Buszinski, live jazz music and dancing. Sunday night, of course, is only Dec. 4, so guests are encouraged to stay until midnight for a Champagne toast. The idea for the Repeal Party came from Perez Klebahn, Mr. Rain's beverage director, who had celebrated the Dec. 5 anniversary with his friends for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2009
When people who have moved away get sentimental about Baltimore, they get especially worked up about Nam Kang. This is the oldest of the several Korean restaurants in the Charles North neighborhood, the one with its entrance down a flight of exterior stairs. Nam Kang is open 17 hours a day, seven days a week, but many of its fans formed lasting attachments to it in the very small hours of the morning, after a night on the town. People will tell you that the food Nam Kang serves, especially things like spicy seafood stews, barbecued meats, and seafood pancakes, is restorative.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 14, 2009
I was on vacation last week, so I was delighted when John Lindner, a frequent contributor to Dining@Large (baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge), volunteered his list of Top 10 Signs You're a Foodie. Needless to say, it sparked some outraged comments: 1 You remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard that Martick's closed. 2 You know that basmati is not the capital of India. 3 Your meal is ruined when you're served from your left (or right -- the point is, darn it, it matters)
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 1, 2008
I am exhausted by the demands of our New England winters. What I do to get over the late-winter blahs is entertain. Nothing fancy. In fact, this is the season when I pull out my comfort-food recipes and invite friends over for laid-back gatherings. Braised short ribs are quintessential comfort fare for this time of year. Rich and satisfying - yes, even fattening! Nothing is better on a cold winter day than short ribs cooked until they are falling off their bones. This recipe for barbecued short ribs was suggested to me by my friend Matt Sunderland, a talented chef in my area.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | December 24, 2006
Irish Charities of Maryland, which also sponsors the Baltimore Irish Festival at Timonium Fairgrounds, recently held a "What's in Your Guinness?" recipe contest to find the tastiest ways to use the Irish beer Guinness in food. Six restaurants entered; this hearty dish from Jeffrey Smith, chef/owner and operator of the Chameleon Cafe in Lauraville, won top honors. BRAISED SHORT RIBS WITH VEAL STOCK GUINNESS REDUCTION Serves 6 to 7 1/2 cup flour salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 2 pounds beef short ribs 1/4 cup vegetable oil 1/2 pound onions, chopped 8 ounces carrots, chopped 3 cups veal stock 4 garlic cloves 1 bay leaf 4 peppercorns 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 can Guinness beer 1/4 cup each, diced: turnips, carrots, rutabaga, parsnips Season flour with salt and pepper.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,sun food editor | September 8, 2004
It's always nice to go out to eat, but a restaurant dinner might not always fit the budget. Instead, try cooking like a chef with this easy dish of braised short ribs. Heat 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil in a large stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown 2 pounds of well-trimmed beef short ribs on all sides. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add one 10 1/2 -ounce can double-strength beef broth or beef consomme, 1 cup of dry red wine, 2 small, quartered onions, 4 cloves of minced garlic and 3 fresh thyme sprigs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2009
When people who have moved away get sentimental about Baltimore, they get especially worked up about Nam Kang. This is the oldest of the several Korean restaurants in the Charles North neighborhood, the one with its entrance down a flight of exterior stairs. Nam Kang is open 17 hours a day, seven days a week, but many of its fans formed lasting attachments to it in the very small hours of the morning, after a night on the town. People will tell you that the food Nam Kang serves, especially things like spicy seafood stews, barbecued meats, and seafood pancakes, is restorative.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,sun food editor | September 8, 2004
It's always nice to go out to eat, but a restaurant dinner might not always fit the budget. Instead, try cooking like a chef with this easy dish of braised short ribs. Heat 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil in a large stockpot over medium heat until hot. Brown 2 pounds of well-trimmed beef short ribs on all sides. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add one 10 1/2 -ounce can double-strength beef broth or beef consomme, 1 cup of dry red wine, 2 small, quartered onions, 4 cloves of minced garlic and 3 fresh thyme sprigs.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
The butcher laughed when I called to order beef short ribs. I wasn't the only one asking. Being a veteran of the meat wars, he could well recall when this meat cut was so unpopular that it wasn't worth wrapping and putting on the shelves. How things have changed. You can't look at an American restaurant menu without seeing some version of braised short ribs. Earlier this year, Bon Appetit magazine named the ribs the dish of the year. The magazine praised the "meaty, rich and meltingly tender" quality of short ribs.
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