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NEWS
January 25, 1995
ANOTHER thing to worry about is that we are growing taller.Because of better nutrition, most of us stand taller than our parents and grandparents. But with human growth hormone and genetic engineering, our children and grandchildren can reach higher yet. "We can easily foresee bigger and bigger humans," Thomas T. Samaras writes in the current issue of The Futurist magazine. "Early in the 21st century [that's the one that starts in five years], basketball players may need to be 8 to 10 feet tall to have any hope of success."
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NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun staff | February 18, 2007
"Short people got no reason to live." Singer Randy Newman, still not living down "Short People" Try singing about being tall. Try sitting in the middle seat of an airplane. Go ahead, find jeans, a snowboard jacket or a bed that fits right. Prone to slouching and shrinking, tall people will never be accused of having a commanding complex named after Napoleon. Tall people, in fact, are a rather soft-spoken, introverted subset of humans, who always field these profound questions: Did you play basketball?
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 18, 2003
GAINESVILLE, Fla. - One inch equals $789 a year, which is bad news for short people. An analysis of data on the pay of tall and short people found that height means a heftier paycheck, reports University of Florida management professor Timothy Judge. "Height matters in career success," Judge said. "These findings are troubling in that, with a few exceptions such as professional basketball, no one could argue that height is an essential ability required for job performance or a bona fide occupational qualification."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 18, 2003
GAINESVILLE, Fla. - One inch equals $789 a year, which is bad news for short people. An analysis of data on the pay of tall and short people found that height means a heftier paycheck, reports University of Florida management professor Timothy Judge. "Height matters in career success," Judge said. "These findings are troubling in that, with a few exceptions such as professional basketball, no one could argue that height is an essential ability required for job performance or a bona fide occupational qualification."
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,Chicago Tribune | May 22, 1991
They stand at the racks all through lunch hour, flipping through long rows of jeans, not one pair of which has less than a 34-inch inseam.They enter some of the finest clothing departments and suddenly become invisible, as sales clerks stare fixedly above their heads.They stand on the tailor's box for a fitting and walk away in a garment splashed with chalk marks and pierced with more pins than a Saddam Hussein voodoo doll.They return for the garment, try it on, and still look as if their trousers were fashioned from grocery bags, while the truncated jacket pockets will hold nothing longer than a pack of gum.They tend to be regular guys in most respects, but their bodies swim in regular sizes.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | February 24, 1992
THERE WAS A jaunty bounce in the step of my friend Grump the conservative."We have sent the message," he said, "and it has been received."What message is that?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 6, 1992
Randy Newman has this thing about hit songs.He knows he can write them. In fact, his "Mama Told Me Not To Come" was a chart-topper for Three Dog Night in 1970, while he himself made it to No. 2 with "Short People," a wickedly funny dismissal of the stature-impaired. And a smattering of his songs, like "I Love L.A." or his "Parenthood" theme "I Love To See You Smile," are well into second lives as TV commercial music.Obviously, there's something salable about the guy's sound.So why doesn't he have more hits?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 10, 1999
Randy NewmanBad Love (Dreamworks 50115)Given the curmudgeonly reputation he's earned through such songs as "It's Money That Matters" and "Short People," there's something almost comic about Randy Newman calling his album "Bad Love." Come on, now -- what other kind of love is the guy going to be writing about?But in a way, the title serves as a sort of warning to those who only know Newman for what he's done lately -- joshing, jovial soundtracks like those to "Toy Story" and "Antz." It has been 22 years since he shocked polite and diminutive listeners alike by insisting that short people "got no reason to live"; indeed, Newman hasn't released a regular pop album since 1988's characteristically dystopian "Land of Dreams."
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun staff | February 18, 2007
"Short people got no reason to live." Singer Randy Newman, still not living down "Short People" Try singing about being tall. Try sitting in the middle seat of an airplane. Go ahead, find jeans, a snowboard jacket or a bed that fits right. Prone to slouching and shrinking, tall people will never be accused of having a commanding complex named after Napoleon. Tall people, in fact, are a rather soft-spoken, introverted subset of humans, who always field these profound questions: Did you play basketball?
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 13, 1995
The Dragons and Aggies and Cowboys and Gophers.Our guys.The Billikens and Demon Deacons and Quakers.All ours, hon.And how about it, football fans, right here in Charm City: the Alaaaaabama Crimmmmmmson Tiiiiiide.Fummmmble!We waited a long time for this. Like, forever.Which is a very long time.But it looks like we did pretty well in our rookie year as a stopover on the road to wherever.We didn't get Tagliabued. Spread the word.In Baltimore's first crack at being an NCAA tournament site, coming in the tournament's 56th year, we drew eight teams that provide something for everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 10, 1999
Randy NewmanBad Love (Dreamworks 50115)Given the curmudgeonly reputation he's earned through such songs as "It's Money That Matters" and "Short People," there's something almost comic about Randy Newman calling his album "Bad Love." Come on, now -- what other kind of love is the guy going to be writing about?But in a way, the title serves as a sort of warning to those who only know Newman for what he's done lately -- joshing, jovial soundtracks like those to "Toy Story" and "Antz." It has been 22 years since he shocked polite and diminutive listeners alike by insisting that short people "got no reason to live"; indeed, Newman hasn't released a regular pop album since 1988's characteristically dystopian "Land of Dreams."
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 13, 1995
The Dragons and Aggies and Cowboys and Gophers.Our guys.The Billikens and Demon Deacons and Quakers.All ours, hon.And how about it, football fans, right here in Charm City: the Alaaaaabama Crimmmmmmson Tiiiiiide.Fummmmble!We waited a long time for this. Like, forever.Which is a very long time.But it looks like we did pretty well in our rookie year as a stopover on the road to wherever.We didn't get Tagliabued. Spread the word.In Baltimore's first crack at being an NCAA tournament site, coming in the tournament's 56th year, we drew eight teams that provide something for everyone.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
ANOTHER thing to worry about is that we are growing taller.Because of better nutrition, most of us stand taller than our parents and grandparents. But with human growth hormone and genetic engineering, our children and grandchildren can reach higher yet. "We can easily foresee bigger and bigger humans," Thomas T. Samaras writes in the current issue of The Futurist magazine. "Early in the 21st century [that's the one that starts in five years], basketball players may need to be 8 to 10 feet tall to have any hope of success."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 6, 1992
Randy Newman has this thing about hit songs.He knows he can write them. In fact, his "Mama Told Me Not To Come" was a chart-topper for Three Dog Night in 1970, while he himself made it to No. 2 with "Short People," a wickedly funny dismissal of the stature-impaired. And a smattering of his songs, like "I Love L.A." or his "Parenthood" theme "I Love To See You Smile," are well into second lives as TV commercial music.Obviously, there's something salable about the guy's sound.So why doesn't he have more hits?
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | February 24, 1992
THERE WAS A jaunty bounce in the step of my friend Grump the conservative."We have sent the message," he said, "and it has been received."What message is that?"
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,Chicago Tribune | May 22, 1991
They stand at the racks all through lunch hour, flipping through long rows of jeans, not one pair of which has less than a 34-inch inseam.They enter some of the finest clothing departments and suddenly become invisible, as sales clerks stare fixedly above their heads.They stand on the tailor's box for a fitting and walk away in a garment splashed with chalk marks and pierced with more pins than a Saddam Hussein voodoo doll.They return for the garment, try it on, and still look as if their trousers were fashioned from grocery bags, while the truncated jacket pockets will hold nothing longer than a pack of gum.They tend to be regular guys in most respects, but their bodies swim in regular sizes.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 5, 1995
After Michael Jackson was attacked for having anti-Semitic language in one of the songs on his new album, "HIStory," he did what most pop stars do when caught in such a situation: He apologized.Then he did something few ever do: He announced that he would re-record the song, sans the offensive lyrics.Rock stars rarely want to change their tunes when complaints over content come in. Most try to get by with an apology or a we-meant-no-offense sticker stuck on the album's packaging. Jackson is doing both, but he is not the first to do either.
NEWS
By JON MARGOLIS | October 2, 1994
Chicago. -- From the occasionally bizarre but never dreary precincts of Boulder, Colorado, comes a missive from one John Meyer, by his own account a photographer, a computer tinkerer and a student of the way the world works.Mr. Meyer, who is 59 years old, has developed something he calls the Elliott Wave Theory of History. Regular players of the stock market know the Elliott Wave theory. It was developed by a market analyst named Ralph Elliott in the 1930s, and is one of several cyclical theories of stock permutations.
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