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NEWS
By Andy Rooney | May 12, 1999
THERE are always stories of people and companies going bankrupt but it doesn't seem as terrible as it used to.When I was young, friends of my parents "went bankrupt." One friend was an officer at a bank that went belly-up; he lost all his worldly possessions. They had no mercy. Court officers took his house, his car and any money he had in his bank account.Donald Trump's companies filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy a few years ago but, in rather short order, he was being called "one of the richest men in the world" again.
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NEWS
November 27, 2007
Former Frederick Mayor Jennifer P. Dougherty has filed to run for the congressional seat held by Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, adding a well-known name to the effort to unseat the eight-term Republican. Dougherty, a restaurant owner and political novice before winning the Frederick mayoral race in 2001, bickered with the Republican-controlled City Council over development issues and a monument of the Ten Commandments. She lost in the Democratic primary in her 2005 re-election bid. She said the Iraq war is one of her chief concerns - she supports a pullout of troops next year, starting with National Guard and Reserve units - and that she would like to focus on transportation and health care.
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NEWS
November 27, 2007
Former Frederick Mayor Jennifer P. Dougherty has filed to run for the congressional seat held by Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, adding a well-known name to the effort to unseat the eight-term Republican. Dougherty, a restaurant owner and political novice before winning the Frederick mayoral race in 2001, bickered with the Republican-controlled City Council over development issues and a monument of the Ten Commandments. She lost in the Democratic primary in her 2005 re-election bid. She said the Iraq war is one of her chief concerns - she supports a pullout of troops next year, starting with National Guard and Reserve units - and that she would like to focus on transportation and health care.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | January 17, 2007
THE CHALLENGE: Susan Kornick, an exhausted mother of three, needed relief from the nightly routine of making five separate dinners for her family. We helped design one meal with something for everyone. Robin Spence, the nutritionist for our monthly Make Over My Meal series, wanted to start the new year with a challenge, and we had one for her. "PLEASE HELP! MOM DESPERATE!" the subject line of the e-mail read. "I am the food preparer for our family -- me, hubby and 3 kids ages 12, 9 and 6," wrote Susan Kornick of Cockeysville.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | November 12, 1993
In an interview in July, former Eagles band member and would-be TV star Glenn Frey said he didn't know what a short order was and, frankly, he didn't care.Frey knows now.His "South of Sunset" TV series was canceled last week after just one episode aired. It was one of the fastest cancellations in the history of television. And it was canceled in part because of a new practice called a short order, which is spreading throughout the TV industry and changing the way decisions about canceling prime-time shows are made.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
THE Democrats had made it a part of their platform, and now that they were back in the White House after a long hiatus, they made good on the promise: Prohibition was repealed officially on Dec. 5, 1933.But for brewers, happy days were here again on April 7, 1933, just a couple of weeks after Congress passed the Cullen-Harrison Bill legalizing 3.2 percent beer.The Beer Can Collectors of America are going all out to celebrate the 60th anniversary, noting that repeal of the Volstead Act (enacted in 1919 over President Woodrow Wilson's veto)
NEWS
June 7, 2004
POLITICIANS OFTEN use a stump speech they deliver with little change at each stop of a campaign swing. Ronald Reagan's usually included some uplifting tale that brought tears to the eyes or a lump to the throat even of those in his entourage who had heard the same lines many times before. So it was that when word came over the weekend of the former president's death at 93, though long expected and a release from wasting illness, the news nonetheless sparked sudden sadness. Mournful moments will no doubt continue through what promises to be an emotional week of funeral commemorations.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Galloway | August 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Unless we are prepared to sit back and watch as our soldiers die by ones, twos and threes day by day in an open-ended occupation of Iraq, it may be time to fish or cut bait. The alternatives would seem to be that we put an Iraqi face on the situation and swiftly withdraw in the sure and certain knowledge that things there will go to hell in short order - or we follow the prescription of former Army Chief of Staff Eric K. Shinseki and put "several hundred thousand troops" into Iraq and clean that place out. Half-measures just won't cut it much longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Will Englund and By Will Englund,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
"Sale of the Century: Russia's Wild Ride from Communism to Capitalism," by Chrystia Freeland. Crown Publishers. 389 pages. $27.50. Soviet propaganda portrayed capitalism as ruthlessly exploitative, rapacious and unscrupulous -- so when Russia turned to capitalism a decade ago, its new business barons figured they had a pretty good idea of how to behave. As Chrystia Freeland points out in her admirable and very readable history of Russian reform, they took their Marxist lessons a bit too literally.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - If Navy is so concerned about the size of the New Mexico defensive line, the key to victory in tomorrow's Emerald Bowl is just a few miles up the freeway. There's this lab over in Burlingame, Calif., where they can do something to level the playing field. That's not funny, of course, but the proximity of Navy's bowl game to the infamous BALCO scandal simply amplifies all that is great about the purer form of college football that is played at the military academies. The Midshipmen always look undersized and overmatched when they face a major college program, but that's because the Naval Academy is one of the few Division I institutions that still has its helmet on straight when it comes to intercollegiate athletics.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - If Navy is so concerned about the size of the New Mexico defensive line, the key to victory in tomorrow's Emerald Bowl is just a few miles up the freeway. There's this lab over in Burlingame, Calif., where they can do something to level the playing field. That's not funny, of course, but the proximity of Navy's bowl game to the infamous BALCO scandal simply amplifies all that is great about the purer form of college football that is played at the military academies. The Midshipmen always look undersized and overmatched when they face a major college program, but that's because the Naval Academy is one of the few Division I institutions that still has its helmet on straight when it comes to intercollegiate athletics.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
Pete's Grille in Waverly is one of those places you think only exists in Barry Levinson movies. At its faded wood counter, doctors squeeze in next to cops. Young teachers sit next to congregants from the local Baptist church. Black and white, young and old, downtown lawyers and Johns Hopkins athletes. An Olympic champion fits in nicely. For the restaurant's owners Lou and Char Sharkey, Michael Phelps is not an Olympic gold medalist. He is not a worldwide swimming sensation, a millionaire or a Speedo pitchman.
NEWS
June 7, 2004
POLITICIANS OFTEN use a stump speech they deliver with little change at each stop of a campaign swing. Ronald Reagan's usually included some uplifting tale that brought tears to the eyes or a lump to the throat even of those in his entourage who had heard the same lines many times before. So it was that when word came over the weekend of the former president's death at 93, though long expected and a release from wasting illness, the news nonetheless sparked sudden sadness. Mournful moments will no doubt continue through what promises to be an emotional week of funeral commemorations.
NEWS
By Joseph L. Galloway | August 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - Unless we are prepared to sit back and watch as our soldiers die by ones, twos and threes day by day in an open-ended occupation of Iraq, it may be time to fish or cut bait. The alternatives would seem to be that we put an Iraqi face on the situation and swiftly withdraw in the sure and certain knowledge that things there will go to hell in short order - or we follow the prescription of former Army Chief of Staff Eric K. Shinseki and put "several hundred thousand troops" into Iraq and clean that place out. Half-measures just won't cut it much longer.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2002
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Some of the Palestinian legislators who came here yesterday arrived hoping that Yasser Arafat would announce he was relinquishing some of his power. Others hoped the Palestinian leader would issue a strong, clear call for militant groups to end attacks against Israelis. All those legislators, meeting in the ruins of Arafat's sandbagged presidential compound, left disappointed. Arafat, who was expected to outline where Palestinian society was heading and how best to end the conflict with Israel, settled for an hour-long stump speech that only hinted at reform and stopped well short of ordering a cease-fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Will Englund and By Will Englund,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
"Sale of the Century: Russia's Wild Ride from Communism to Capitalism," by Chrystia Freeland. Crown Publishers. 389 pages. $27.50. Soviet propaganda portrayed capitalism as ruthlessly exploitative, rapacious and unscrupulous -- so when Russia turned to capitalism a decade ago, its new business barons figured they had a pretty good idea of how to behave. As Chrystia Freeland points out in her admirable and very readable history of Russian reform, they took their Marxist lessons a bit too literally.
NEWS
By Carlos Raphael Greenlee | August 8, 1996
we all love the smellof sun-fried skinwe savor the aromaof slowly burning flesh:mixed with sun-tan lotion,perspiration, salt, sand,and pheromones;marinated in ocean waterand sea shells,with a tiny dashof melanomato go.big big citybreathe:fear fear fearinto heart and lungsfear fear fearmountainous buildingsominousfear fear fearnot of bullets of crimefear fear fearof the height of the skylinePub Date: 8/08/96
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | January 17, 2007
THE CHALLENGE: Susan Kornick, an exhausted mother of three, needed relief from the nightly routine of making five separate dinners for her family. We helped design one meal with something for everyone. Robin Spence, the nutritionist for our monthly Make Over My Meal series, wanted to start the new year with a challenge, and we had one for her. "PLEASE HELP! MOM DESPERATE!" the subject line of the e-mail read. "I am the food preparer for our family -- me, hubby and 3 kids ages 12, 9 and 6," wrote Susan Kornick of Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Andy Rooney | May 12, 1999
THERE are always stories of people and companies going bankrupt but it doesn't seem as terrible as it used to.When I was young, friends of my parents "went bankrupt." One friend was an officer at a bank that went belly-up; he lost all his worldly possessions. They had no mercy. Court officers took his house, his car and any money he had in his bank account.Donald Trump's companies filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy a few years ago but, in rather short order, he was being called "one of the richest men in the world" again.
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