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March 29, 1992
The park's steel superstructure rises eight stories from the ground.
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By Dennis O'Brien and By Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff | June 5, 2005
The tour offered by America's oldest brewery includes a guaranteed crowd pleaser: free beer. The hourlong tour of the D.G. Yuengling Brewery in Pottsville, Pa., ends with two free cold ones served in the rathskeller, a small subterranean bar built for employees in 1936 that's reserved now for tourists. Such generosity may be why 60,000 people each year visit this five-story mountain of brick that looms over a hilly town so reminiscent of America's Industrial Age. But to fully understand the attraction may require a brief bit of history.
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By Bob Downing and Bob Downing,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | May 29, 2005
The Steel City has rediscovered its waterfront. You can enjoy the Ohio, Allegheny and Monongahela rivers in Pittsburgh on water, on foot and on bicycles. You can paddle the rivers in a kayak near the Golden Triangle where the three meet. Or, if you're so inclined, you can enjoy a dinner cruise with live music and dancing, or a more sedate trip in a "Duck" boat, an amphibious vehicle. You can pedal along the rivers to the south on the Great Allegheny Passage all the way to Cumberland, Md., and even to Washington, D.C. Cumberland is a jaunt of 152 miles from Pittsburgh, and Washington's a little farther: another 184.5 miles along the C&O Canal Towpath.
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By Barbara Brotman and Barbara Brotman,Chicago Tribune | May 8, 2005
Ah, New York, home to some of the nation's unique and magnificent sights: The Statue of Liberty, Broadway -- and the resale stores of the Upper East Side. You raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of the resale stores of the Upper East Side? Perhaps you have never bought an Ann Taylor tweed suit for $20 in such mint condition that the pockets were still stitched closed. In which case all the more reason for you to ditch the Empire State Building. Go ahead and sneer, if you don't like buying Ferragamos cheap.
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By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
There's a monument at the corner of Washington Avenue and Pitt Street in Fredericksburg, Va., engraved to proclaim that the woman buried below it is "Mary, the Mother of Washington." It sounds almost biblical, consistent with the high regard many people had for George Washington and his family. (Lots of people disliked him, too; they just didn't make statements in marble about it.) But to me what's attractive about Fredericksburg is the opportunity it gives us to sweep away the legendary stuff -- good or bad -- and see the day-to-day realities of Washington's life and the lives of people of his time.
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By Rebecca Ann Markway and Rebecca Ann Markway,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 21, 2004
They add to the skyline of the nation's capital with rising towers and steeples, angels, crosses and gargoyles, and bells pealing in the distance. Washington does not just have famous monuments and government buildings -- it is home to some of the world's most impressive churches, temples and shrines, which attract crowds to their gift shops as well as chapels and sanctuaries. For tourists interested in history and architecture, Washington's churches are must-see stops. National Cathedral The grandest Washington church of all -- the National Cathedral -- sits atop a hill at slightly more than 600 feet above sea level, the highest point in the District of Columbia.
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By Margo Wilson and Margo Wilson,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
Bold settlers crossing the Allegheny Mountains and heading west nearly two centuries ago pushed through 90 miles of nearly im- penetrable southwestern Pennsylvania backwoods on a ribbon of gravel and stone -- the Cumberland Road -- linking Cumberland and Wheeling, W.Va. Those Pennsylvania woods and adjacent small towns, where the French and Indian War broke out, are tamer these days, and the region is a bit more sophisticated. But residents in this area, about an hour south of Pittsburgh, skirting what is now U.S. 40 -- the National Road -- retain their independent spirit as they borrow what's useful from the 21st century while cherishing their ties to America's beginnings.
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By John Woestendiek and Erika Hobbs | October 24, 2004
Whether you're a hiker or bicyclist, history buff or railroad enthusiast, leaf-peeper or craft-seeker, the town of Cumberland has two words for you. Exit. Now. Even if it's just a spur-of-the-moment getaway to see the fast-fading remnants of Western Maryland's fall foliage, Cumberland -- whether you're in Baltimore, Washington or Pittsburgh -- is less than a three-hour drive. You can leave after work and get there in time for dinner. And don't worry about finding Cumberland in the dark.
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By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | October 3, 2004
Tip No. 1 for a trip to Green Bank, W.Va.: Pack lots of CDs. If you hit the "scan" button on your car radio, all you will get is an endless display of numbers as the radio searches vainly for a station. There aren't any. There isn't much else out here in east-central West Virginia, either -- just an occasional farm, a logging truck or, scampering back into the Monongahela National Forest, a deer. The trip here, via routes 55 and 28, winds up into the clouds where snakes of mist curl around the road.
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By Beth Luberecki and Beth Luberecki,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2004
I never thought I'd find myself lying near a flower bed behind the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. That kind of behavior could definitely raise a few eyebrows in Washington. But here I am, and I'm not alone - five other people are stretched out beside me. Don't get the wrong idea. We're not up to anything illicit. We're on the ground, cameras in hand, on the orders of E. David Luria, a photographer leading us on a Washington Photo Safari. Luria swears that we can get a great shot of the building from this angle.
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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | September 5, 2004
Vibrations from the heavy machines made the floor beneath our feet rumble. Through the plate-glass windows, we could see giant machines at work, sprinkling salt on potato chips and weighing pretzels before they were placed in bags. Our guide at the Snyder's of Hanover factory in Hanover, Pa., Chris Long, showered us with facts and tidbits as we watched the high-tech process of creating snack foods. We learned, for example, that Snyder's has about 1,000 employees and that the journey from raw flour to finished pretzel takes about 45 minutes.
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