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By Phil Rogers | June 6, 2010
It is looking more and more like Mark DeRosa will need a second wrist surgery, which probably would end his season. He's in the first year of a two-year, $12 million deal with the Giants, who remain a hitter or two short. … Mike Lowell (above) remains a possibility for the Rangers. Rookie first baseman Justin Smoak, a switch hitter, has been terrible against left-handers, and Lowell's playing time has been limited by David Ortiz in Boston. … The Brewers might have to release Trevor Hoffman, although they continue to try to find him a role in the bullpen.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
INDIANAPOLIS - The mistakes came early and late. Steve Smith fumbled the first pass Joe Flacco threw. Torrey Smith dropped the last one, a sideline opportunity that would have kept the Ravens' comeback hopes alive, if only for a little longer. In between, the Ravens defense accomplished much of what they wanted against the NFL's highest-scoring team, only to watch their own offense falter repeatedly. A 20-13 loss to the Indianapolis Colts before an announced crowd of 65,258 at Lucas Oil Stadium was a definite missed opportunity for the Ravens, who did all the things that they avoided doing during their three-game winning streak.
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NEWS
February 20, 2004
On February 17, 2004; GARY A. SHORT, beloved father of Regina Short of Columbia, MD; loving companion of Jo Ann Fowler; devoted brother of Lloyd Short, Ray Short both of S. Carolina, Juanita Short of Frederick, MD and the late Fred Short; dear ex-husband of Sara Short. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Wednesday February 25 at 10 AM. Interment MD Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be directed to Dept.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports and news services | September 21, 2014
Chris Moller made a 38-yard field goal with 28 seconds left in the game to lift Morgan State (2-2, 1-0 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) to a 38-35 victory over Howard (1-3, 0-1) in the New York Urban League Football Classic on Saturday in East Rutherford, N.J. Morgan State opened a 14-0 lead, but Howard rallied with two scoring drives, including a 1-yard run by quarterback Greg McGhee with 5:04 left in the first half. The Bears broke the 14-all halftime tie by adding three touchdowns in the third quarter, two by Herb Walker Jr. But the Bison had one scoring drive in the third and two touchdowns in the fourth to tie the game at 35 with 2:27 left.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
HENRY CHARLES ROE SHORT a retired insurance company executive died July 30, 2008 from Cancer. He was 92 years old and lived in Towson. In 1980 he retired from the Sun Life Insurance Co. of America where he was the training officer of the company. He started with Sun Life in 1938 as an agent. During his career he was active in industry Circles as a part member of the board of directors of the Baltimore Life Underwriters Association, member of the Maryland Life Underwriters Association, and General Agents, and Managers Association.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 2, 1993
There's a misfit at every parade. Cheerleaders kick and cymbals clash -- and a skulking figure in the shadows prays for rain.In the stock market, these ghouls are investors called short-sellers, contrary types who lie awake nights hoping stock prices will go down.These days short-sellers are happily predicting apocalypse now. The prices of many stocks, they say, have reached highs that cannot be justified according to historic gauges of market performance, such as price-to-earnings ratios.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 27, 1992
(Mike Royko is on vacation this week. The following column was selected from among his favorites. It was originally published in June 1983.)Everybody at the bar was staring at the TV set. Somebody on the screen was lining up a putt. An announcer with a British accent was explaining the great importance of the ball rolling into the hole.Just then a gravelly voice from the end of the bar said: "Why don't you switch channels? Let's see what else is on."It was Fat Harry."What are you talking about, Harry?"
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 8, 1991
Remember the short-hair craze started a couple of years ago by supermodel Linda Evangelista, the runway Queen of Coifs?Well, short is still chic, but now it's a longer short.The dilemma, as anyone who has ever worn bangs can attest, is how not to look goofy while the locks grow out.Take another tip from Linda. Or at least from the hair stylists who did her hair during the most recent runway shows.Roller sets.High glamour is making a comeback in a big way. And big, unbrushed curls, a la Marilyn Monroe, fit right in."
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2008
Scott Taylor bought suits from a Jos. A. Bank men's store in Baltimore in 2001 and was so impressed with the service that when he got home, after doing some research, he bought shares in the Hampstead-based company. He's been happy with his investment, which has grown sixfold. He bought his first shares at about $5. Yesterday the company's shares closed at $30.10. What puzzles Taylor is why so many investors are betting against Bank by shorting its stock - a bet that the share price will fall.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
The Frederick Keys wrapped up a first-half divisional title in the Single-A Carolina League, and the call for promotion to Bowie came shortly thereafter.To the Baysox: Hut Smith, Jim Foster, David Lamb, Augie Ojeda. One name was conspicuously missing: Rick Short."Yes, I was a little disappointed," said Short, who, with Foster gone, is challenging for the league batting title and was the league's Player of the Month in June."The main problem is the Orioles have a lot of good infielders on the Double-A level.
NEWS
By Frederic Hill and Sam Gardiner | September 18, 2014
Geopolitical analysts are especially fond of quoting Edmund Burke and George Santayana on the folly of ignoring the lessons of history and the dangers of repeating the original decisions. But what's even more imprudent, and potentially fatal, is to learn the wrong lessons from history — and by avoiding the previous mistakes, plow ahead without understanding the causes of their failure. President Barack Obama is now in danger of steering a perilous course in confronting the threat of Islamic State in the Middle East (also known as ISIS or ISIL)
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was hospitalized Saturday night after complaining of shortness of breath at the Star-Spangled Spectacular festiivities at Ft. McHenry. The mayor delivered her remarks at the event, which included the vice president and the British ambassador, before leaving the stage around 8 p.m., mayoral spokesman Kevin Harris said. She was alert and communicating with staffers and family, he said. Harris said Rawlings-Blake would be kept overnight at the hospital for observation; he declined to name the hospital due to privacy concerns.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A four-year starter, Catonsville's All-Metro first-team forward Jennifer Nonn enjoyed a banner junior season with the exception of one thing - it's end. She scored 21 goals and added 10 assists to help lead the No. 5 Comets to their first Class 4A state title game, but they fell to Whitman, 2-0. For Nonn, it was tough to take then, but motivating now. The Comets have a number of players back to make another run under first-year coach Gary Lynch,...
SPORTS
Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
As much as the Ravens wanted to forget about the 2013 season, the memories - or should we say nightmares? - came rushing back. There was the slow start on offense, a few head-scratching miscues by quarterback Joe Flacco and a total abandonment of a punchless running game. Then, when it appeared that an 80-yard Flacco touchdown pass to Steve Smith would make all of that not matter, their defense reverted back to last year's form with a critical letdown at the worst possible time. Sound familiar?
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The sky isn't quite falling yet, but gambling casinos are folding like battered beach chairs in Atlantic City ( "Baltimore's casino reality," Aug. 26) It seems any lingering mention of Atlantic City evolving into an East Coast version of Las Vegas has been carried away in the Atlantic Ocean surf. I can remember 30 years ago when everyone spoke of the new gambling mecca in Atlantic City as the shining star of the Mid-Atlantic region. My, how the supposedly mighty have fallen.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The decision by the state to eliminate funding for the proposed rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park is patently absurd ( "State pulls $30 million from rail facility project in major victory for community activists," Aug. 28). Over the recent past we have seen many businesses consolidate and move their headquarters out of the Baltimore area. One the few assets that Baltimore has that can't be moved is the port. But it seems that the powers that manage the state and city are in the process of diminishing the value of the port to the businesses that utilize it. While it's popular to blame the railroad, the fact is that the railroad must operate, within the law, in a manner to maximize profits for its shareholders.
NEWS
January 25, 2010
A nne Arundel County has a long history of capping property taxes, a policy that has kept its rate among the lowest in the Baltimore area but which has forced a generation of county executives to look for creative ways to bolster tax revenue. That history may have something to do with the county's decision to apply its recordation tax far more broadly than any other jurisdiction in the state - and perhaps even in the country. It is a policy that penalizes short selling, the sale of real estate at below mortgage value, an increasingly common event as owners and lenders alike seek to avoid foreclosure proceedings.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
Students go back to school for the first time Tuesday in only one school system in Maryland. That would be Worcester County, home of Ocean City where the lure of sun, sand - and the availability of teen labor - convinced the local school board to rewrite the academic calendar for the 2014-2015 year. Elsewhere, public school systems opened last week, and they appear universally satisfied with their choice. That 23 of Maryland's 24 school systems continue to prefer a pre-Labor Day starting date would seem to present a teachable moment to everyone but Comptroller Peter Franchot, who continues his quixotic crusade to force a longer summer break.
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