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NEWS
July 23, 2007
It was common gossip within the contractor community that damage to Maryland's waterfront caused by Tropical Storm Isabel in fall 2003 was regarded by some property owners as less a disaster than an opportunity. Piers, bulkheads and shoreline washed away could be replaced at a scale bigger and better than would otherwise be allowed - particularly if no one was paying close attention to hastily issued permits that limited restoration work to the dimensions of what was lost. But in the case of William and Janice Costello, someone was paying attention, and the federal and state governments have effectively thrown the book at them for violating the Clean Water Act and Maryland wetlands protections.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Anne Arundel County officially opened a new water access point Wednesday in Shady Side, an offshoot of a citizen-led effort to increase public access to bodies of water. More than 70 residents and county officials attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony at Shady Side Park, and officials said attendees brought more than 30 kayaks to give the new facility a test drive. The access point - on Parish Creek, which feeds into the West and Rhode rivers - offers enthusiasts a place to put in their kayaks, canoes, inner tubes and paddleboards.
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NEWS
July 23, 2006
Maryland is home to about 205,000 registered boats - a 10 percent increase over a decade ago - and untold fleets of canoes, kayaks and skiffs, with most of them getting their bottoms wet in the Chesapeake. With more than 3,100 miles of tidal shoreline around the bay - almost equal to the distance between the East and the West coasts - it's no wonder that the region is favored by recreational paddlers, sailors and power boaters. But the shoreline is shrinking in a way that has nothing to do with erosion or global warming.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The U.S. Department of Interior has awarded more than $7 million to four projects in Maryland aimed at guarding Chesapeake Bay shoreline and habitat against future severe storms. The funding is part of $107 million in "coastal resilience" grants distributed among 11 states - from Massachusetts to Virginia and west to Ohio - to help protect them from the kind of damage wrought by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. A plan to add 25 acres of new salt marsh and remove invasive plants in Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge received $3.5 million.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
A woman's body found Saturday afternoon along the Kent Island shoreline has been identified as that of a local woman who had been missing for three weeks, the Maryland State Police said Sunday. Police said doctors at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore identified the body through dental records. The cause and manner of death are still under investigation. A man who was fishing off a pier saw the body in the water near the shoreline and called police about 3:30 p.m. Saturday, according to state police.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 14, 2012
With fall just around the corner, it's time for the whirlwind of shoreline tidying known as the International Coastal Cleanup . Now in its 27th year, the volunteer effort sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy involves nearly 5,400 different cleanups around the world, including 10 right here in the Baltimore area, from Lake Roland to Fort McHenry and Fort Smallwood. Many are set for Saturday, Sept. 15, but if it's too late to get in on those others are planned over the next few weeks.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler | March 22, 2008
The O'Malley administration's bid to tighten shoreline development restrictions won preliminary House approval yesterday, as builders and local officials joined environmentalists in backing the compromise legislation. The bill, which would overhaul the 24-year-old Critical Area law regulating construction near the Chesapeake Bay, has been the subject of lengthy negotiations among all parties. The legislation would grant greater authority to the 29- member state commission that oversees development within the 1,000-foot strip of bay front known as the "critical area" because it helps keep pollution from washing into the water and protects wildlife habitat.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The U.S. Department of Interior has awarded more than $7 million to four projects in Maryland aimed at guarding Chesapeake Bay shoreline and habitat against future severe storms. The funding is part of $107 million in "coastal resilience" grants distributed among 11 states - from Massachusetts to Virginia and west to Ohio - to help protect them from the kind of damage wrought by Superstorm Sandy in 2012. A plan to add 25 acres of new salt marsh and remove invasive plants in Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge received $3.5 million.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
Responding to criticism by a state commission that they weren't doing enough to protect the shoreline from development, Anne Arundel County officials have launched an ambitious enforcement program, including the use of a helicopter to locate waterfront trouble spots. Last year, the county was rebuked by the Critical Area Commission, which enforces a state law limiting development within 1,000 feet of the bay, for failing to properly enforce the law and follow up on reported violations.
NEWS
July 22, 2008
If the downturn in Maryland's real estate industry weren't bad enough, it has also had the effect of greatly diminishing the state's much-needed land conservation efforts. Program Open Space, which underwrites much of the state and local land purchases, is financed by a tax on real estate transfers. With properties changing hands less often - and at diminished values - the impact on open space has been dramatic. In fiscal 2007, Maryland committed more than $278 million toward creating or expanding state and local parks and conservation areas, the most for the program since it was established in 1969.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Discarded bottles, empty bags of chips and errant playground balls littered the shoreline of the Fort McHenry Wetland, a 7.5-acre hub of biodiversity home to hundreds of plant and animal species. "Anything that floats ends up downstream," said Laura Bankey, director of conservation for the National Aquarium, the wetland's steward since 1999. "Because this is a soft shoreline with vegetation, it ends up here. " To combat pollution plaguing the marsh habitat, about 250 volunteers picked up trash, dredged debris, planted trees and tended the wetland's gardens Saturday as part of a cleanup event hosted by the aquarium and the National Parks Conservation Association.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | June 11, 2013
With 140 miles of shoreline and boating access, not only to the upper Chesapeake Bay but also the 5,000-acre impoundment held back by Conowingo Dam, Harford County has many opportunities for boaters and others who enjoy spending time on the water. Though much of the county's shoreline is off limits to the general public because it is part of restricted areas on Aberdeen Proving Ground, the county still boasts several marinas and boat ramps. MARINAS Bush River Boat Works (Perryman)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
A woman's body found Saturday afternoon along the Kent Island shoreline has been identified as that of a local woman who had been missing for three weeks, the Maryland State Police said Sunday. Police said doctors at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore identified the body through dental records. The cause and manner of death are still under investigation. A man who was fishing off a pier saw the body in the water near the shoreline and called police about 3:30 p.m. Saturday, according to state police.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 14, 2012
With fall just around the corner, it's time for the whirlwind of shoreline tidying known as the International Coastal Cleanup . Now in its 27th year, the volunteer effort sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy involves nearly 5,400 different cleanups around the world, including 10 right here in the Baltimore area, from Lake Roland to Fort McHenry and Fort Smallwood. Many are set for Saturday, Sept. 15, but if it's too late to get in on those others are planned over the next few weeks.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
An Severna Park man has been fined $11,500 for cutting trees in the designated shoreline buffer zone without permits or permission, authorities said. William E. Clark, of the 200 block of Lennox Ave., pleaded guilty to violating Maryland's shoreline development law, according to a Friday statement from the attorney general's office. In Mary 2010, Clark hired a tree service to remove several trees on his property and land owned by the Olde Severna Park Improvement Association Inc. that abuts his home and a beach area on the Severn River, the statement said.
EXPLORE
September 15, 2011
Cornerstone Records Management LLC , of Columbia, announced it has completed the acquisition of the assets of Shoreline Records, in Medford, N.Y. Shoreline's core business is the secured storage of hardcopy records and document imaging. Additionally, Cornerstone recently established a new credit facility, to support its rapid growth initiatives. The acquisition of Shoreline Records represents the 18th acquisition completed by Cornerstone since June 2008. Aimstar Information Solutions Inc ., of Columbia, has been awarded an 8(a)
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
For more than a half-century, Marylanders have piled heaps of concrete, metal and stone along Maryland's shoreline in a bid to stop erosion, a trend that led residents to name the banks of one waterway "Fortress Severn."Now, backed by new state guidelines, many residents are shunning such expensive barriers for a more environmentally sound approach: placing rocks, adding sand and building a marsh."We're trying to give Mother Nature a hand up," said John Flood, a former bulkhead builder in Anne Arundel County who consults on dozens of marsh projects.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
In a sweeping vision for Baltimore County's shoreline, officials have crafted an ambitious blueprint for a waterfront village featuring tony restaurants and shops, hundreds of new homes and a spruced-up fronting along Middle River. Initially, about $30 million in state and county money would be used to demolish rundown businesses and dilapidated housing complexes, transforming more than 400 acres into an area that could attract developers and new residents. Private investments tallying more than $70 million would be needed to build housing and commercial projects there.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
I love the knack Croatians have for taking a humble stretch of rocky shoreline and turning it into a wildly romantic bar or cafe. At Valentino Bar in the coastal town of Rovinj, the woman who runs the place hands out pillows as you arrive, an invitation to find your own nook in the rocks overlooking the bay. As the sunset fades and the flames on the old-time candelabra seem to brighten, you realize that you don't need to be rich to enjoy a luxurious moment...
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
A 13-story structure pitched as Baltimore's Eiffel Tower and a 200-foot-tall Ferris wheel could rewrite the skyline of downtown Baltimore if either is approved by city officials for the Inner Harbor waterfront. The city and the Baltimore Development Corp., its quasi-public development arm, released details this week of nine proposals received last month from companies in the United States and Europe. One or more of the proposed attractions could be installed as part of a city plan to provide family-friendly entertainment along the downtown waterfront.
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