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BY THE ANNAPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 11, 1991
Today is Eastern Shore Pride Day, and in celebration a group of Eastern Shore residents plans to dump two outhouses on the steps of the State House.For those unfamiliar with this tradition, it draws from 10-day-old Maryland folklore involving Eastern Shore legislators, Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the phrase, "How's that s - - - house of an Eastern Shore."It seems a lot of Shore residents are still upset about the governor's comment. They have declared today Eastern Shore Pride Day and will present the outhouses (provided by some Shore farmers)
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Terence T. Finn, a retired NASA executive who boosted the Space Shuttle program and whose passion for military history fueled four books on the subject, died June 27 of a blood platelet disorder. The Eastern Shore resident was 71. Dr. Finn, a New York native, spent his working life in the Washington area as a federal employee, first as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, a Maryland Democrat. Dr. Finn worked on Capitol Hill from 1966 to 1977, in staff positions that included senior counsel for energy, science and space at the Senate Budget Committee.
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NEWS
October 30, 1992
Lake Shore residents petition for left turn signalRush-hour traffic jams at Lake Shore Drive and Mountain Road have led angry Lake Shore residents to demand a left turn signal there.Sharon Funk, a resident of Belgarden Lane, has collected morthan 100 signatures on a petition among neighbors who want the signal to make left turns easier from the westbound lane of Mountain Road.Heavy eastbound traffic in the afternoons makes it nearly impossible for westbound drivers to enter Lake Shore Drive, Mrs. Funk said.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
NEWS
April 19, 1994
IN THE waning weeks of the General Assembly session, Sen. Walter Baker half-heartedly tried to introduce a bill to let Eastern Shore voters decide whether they want to secede from Maryland. Not everyone took the idea lightly. The bill touched a nerve.The Eastern Shore has traditionally been scoffed at by some living west of the Chesapeake, who have viewed those on the Shore as reactionaries and rednecks. Remember Gov. William Donald Schaefer's X-rated comment about the Shore's backward condition?
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | December 4, 1992
CAMBRIDGE -- Sen. Phil Gramm's recent remarks about the quality of labor on the Eastern Shore hasn't endeared him to builders in the vicinity of his vacation home in Dorchester County."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Marina Sarris contributed to this story | February 11, 1991
With wooden outhouses in their pickup trucks, bags o manure in their hands and talk of secession on their lips, a band of angry Eastern Shore residents descended upon the State House today, demanding that Gov. William Donald Schaefer be held accountable for likening their region to an outdoor toilet."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff William Thompson contributed to this story | February 12, 1991
At least one Eastern Shore resident is happy that Gov. William Donald Schaefer has apologized to her region for likening it to an outdoor toilet, but she still plans to watch him carefully."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun Tom Bowman of the Washington Bureau of The Sun contributed to this article | February 5, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Still bristling over Gov. William Donald Schaefer's odoriferously off-color description of the Eastern Shore, House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, demanded yesterday a formal apology from the state's chief executive."
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer offended the Eastern Shore delegation yesterday with a private but profane reference to their home counties.The remark was made as members of the House and Senate, who seemed to be in a particularly jovial mood, gathered in joint session for the swearing-in of state Treasurer Lucille Maurer.As the 69-year-old chief executive made his way down the center aisle of the House chamber past a cluster of Eastern Shore delegates and senators, he reportedly leaned in and said: "How's that s--- house of an Eastern Shore?"
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Maryland emergency management officials are asking lower Eastern Shore residents to report damage to their property that occurred during Superstorm Sandy as part of an effort to appeal denial of federal storm cleanup money. Residents of Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico  and Worcester counties with damage to report are asked to call the Maryland Department of Human Resources Relief Hotline for Superstorm Sandy at 888-756-7836. State officials are seeking to gather as much information on damage as possible to boost Maryland's application for federal relief funds.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
A proposed State Department security training center, planned for Maryland's Eastern Shore until local residents objected, could wind up in Pennsylvania instead. Gina Gilliam, a spokeswoman for the federal government's real estate arm, confirmed that officials from Washington traveled to Wilkes-Barre, Pa., recently and met with a local congressman about the proposed facility. Rep. Paul Kanjorski toured a site in his district with members of the State Department and General Services Administration team overseeing the long-sought project.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | July 25, 2009
A fourth person has died of swine flu in Maryland - but unlike previous deaths in the state, the person did not appear to also have an underlying medical problem, health officials said Friday. Officials gave few details on the death, saying only that the person was an adult from the Eastern Shore with no "immediately apparent underlying medical condition or risk factors." State health officials said the death of someone without pre-existing illness should serve as a reminder to the public of how serious this flu, known as H1N1, can be - even in otherwise healthy people.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | September 24, 2007
PRESTON --Twenty years ago, when Mimi and Bill Willis were still considered newcomers in this Eastern Shore village, they whiled away late-summer evenings on the front porch - chatting, rocking, listening to warm-weather sounds and counting the reasons they'd left the congestion of suburban Washington. ... Not anymore. Like their neighbors who live along Main Street, they have long since retreated indoors to block out the din of cars and trucks rumbling through - 11,149 vehicles a day, by the State Highway Administration's count.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
More than three weeks after Adam Mooney's family learned that he was missing after a helicopter crash in Iraq, they have received the news they expected and dreaded: The Eastern Shore Army first lieutenant is dead. A Tacoma, Wash., newspaper first reported that Mooney's body was found Friday by Mosul residents. Maj. David Farlow of U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Fla., confirmed yesterday that the remains have been recovered for all troops involved in a series of Jan. 25 mishaps. Mooney, 28, becomes the sixth Maryland servicemen killed since March 20, when the United States and its allies launched the war on Iraq.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
CHESTERTOWN - In the years surrounding the Revolutionary War, this Chester River port town was situated on one of the most traveled north-south highways. But today, quaint Chestertown, population 4,000, no longer prides itself on commerce. Quite the opposite. Chestertown's most cherished commodity isn't growth, but its charm. So it was with a sense of relief that many residents and merchants greeted the news that the Kent County Planning Commission had rejected Wal-Mart's proposal to build a giant discount store in an old airfield on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | February 5, 1991
Calling the Eastern Shore a vulgar term synonymous for an outhouse may have been only a joke to Gov. William Donald Schaefer, but one powerful Eastern Shore lawmaker said the barb missed his constituents' funny bones by a mile."
FEATURES
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
The latest puff of jingoism to rise from Maryland's tidewater flatlands is a bumper sticker epithet not likely to earn kudos from the local tourism boosters."
NEWS
October 10, 2000
Charting a course to make the shore strong and vibrant The Sun's article "Suggestions ready to help E. Shore" (Sept. 23) failed to fully capture the commitment of the countless people who participated in the Eastern Shore Development Task Force. Appointed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the task force has worked hard to develop recommendations to address the issues that have prevented the entire shore from fully experiencing the benefits of our recent economic prosperity. The task force involved a cross-section of people from across the nine shore counties, including more than 170 local and state officials, business and community leaders and local residents -- not just the 35-member steering committee the article mentioned.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
KIPTOPEKE, VA. -- The crimson light of a Chesapeake Bay sunset bathes Gary C. Byler's study, filtering through a wall of glass into the airy family room and kitchen of the sprawling home where he moved with his wife and four young children a couple of years ago. Settled in a secluded 4-acre site on high sand dunes near the southernmost tip of the Delmarva Peninsula, the Bylers live a few steps from one of the bay's most pristine beaches, a...
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