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Shopping Malls

NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | November 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- They come in as a steady barrage, about 30,000 each year, intelligence tips suggesting a new potential threat to the United States. Yesterday, another surfaced publicly: a threat to shopping malls in Chicago and Los Angeles during the holiday season. The FBI, which produced the threat report, immediately played down its credibility, and the Department of Homeland Security was quick to say it had nothing to do with the report. But the rush to discount the threat, first reported by ABC News, highlighted what is perhaps the most difficult challenge counterterrorism analysts contend with: determining which threats are real.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Harry J. Herman Sr., a Southeast Baltimore baker who expanded a corner Canton shop into a business with more than $2 million in annual sales, died of cancer Friday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 85. He was known for his variation on strawberry shortcake, in which he broke with custom and substituted a sweet yellow layer cake for traditional shortcake. His version caught on, as did his belief in bakery branches in neighborhoods -- and later shopping malls -- where he saw his customers moving.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Peyton Skipwith Cochran Jr., a longtime Rouse Co. executive who helped develop shopping centers but was deeply interested in land preservation, died Thursday at Springwell Senior Living in Baltimore from complications of Alzheimer's and a stroke. He was 85. In addition to helping start two local groups that reflected his interest in the outdoors, Mr. Cochran — known as Skip — was active in fox hunting and steeplechasing. He was a partner in Arcadia Stable, owner of Buck Jakes, a horse that twice won the Maryland Hunt Cup and died at age 24 in January.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Affluent shoppers with a penchant for Gucci handbags and Prada shoes might soon be able to swipe their gold cards again and again along one short stretch of the South Florida seaboard. The Rouse Co., the Columbia-based retail company, said yesterday that it settled a 2-year-old lawsuit in which it had contended that a competing mall was illegally preventing some of the world's best-known purveyors of upscale goods from also locating in a new Rouse mall 14 miles away. Rouse plans a September opening for Village of Merrick Park in Coral Gables, Fla., recently touted by the company as a premier member of its portfolio.
NEWS
August 29, 1996
ONCE, people went to shopping malls to buy clothes, books and many other things. But these retail complexes have evolved from mere shopping meccas into community centers.All sorts of non-shopping activities have become part of the mall experience. They range from senior citizens who show up in squads to take their morning stroll in air-conditioned splendor to teen-agers who congregate at night and weekends in search of some action.A recent story in The Sun about Charlotte Davis and Jeff Rogers offered more evidence of this transformation of regional malls.
NEWS
June 19, 1991
Shopping malls are used for so much these days, from Girl Scout encampments to organized exercise walking. Malls are even tourist attractions: Water Tower Place in Chicago, Union Station in Indianapolis, Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco, Harborplace in Baltimore.Can we reasonably expect malls to function as art galleries? This year, the Columbia Festival of the Arts added a visual arts component, arranging for an exhibit at the Columbia Mall. The Rouse Co., which runs the mall, decided to place restrictions on art "which explores human forms in the nude whether they are sexually explicit or not; which has obscene writings or images; that suggests the use of violent behavior."
NEWS
April 22, 2013
Just when you thought Annapolis had run out of new ways to tax us, now we're all going to be hit again with the accurately named "rain tax" ("Anger grows over stormwater fees," April 16). Of course, the editors of The Sun think this is just wonderful and sorely needed to pay for all the new storm drains, collection ponds, stream restorations and so on mandated the E.P.A. Funny though, how it was only a couple of years ago that we were told the major cause of pollution in the bay was manure from chicken farms and agricultural run-off on the Eastern Shore.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
The Rouse Co. reported a gain yesterday in funds from operations. But taking into account almost $52 million in one-time charges, the company lost money in the fourth quarter. The charges stem from a corporate reorganization, which will spill over into this year, and declining values of shopping malls in New Jersey and Florida. The malls accounted for $39 million of the charges. Analysts said the charges were appropriate and that the quarterly loss was not significant. "We were impressed with the quarter," said David Fick, a managing director and Rouse analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc., who criticized last year the way the company accounted in its funds from operations for the charges from corporate restructuring.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 18, 1992
After listening to an hour of virulent anti-smoking testimony Mondaynight, Rouse spokesman James D. Lano almost seemed ready to cry "uncle."Would the County Council be willing to accept a compromise ona proposal by C. Vernon Gray, D-6th, to ban smoking in enclosed shopping malls, he asked.Lano, assistant general counsel at the Rouse Co., suggested that smoking areas on the first floor of The Mall in Columbia near eating pavilions be eliminated and that smoking be allowed in special areas on the second floor only.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Eight village centers at the heart of James W. Rouse's vision for a new suburban city are being sold with other major Columbia retailing hubs as the Rouse Co. shifts its focus away from the community it created out of 14,000 acres of Howard County farmland. Rouse is selling a majority interest in the properties to Kimco Realty Corp. of New Hyde Park, N.Y. The price of the deal, to be completed in 30 to 60 days, was not disclosed. The news arrived in letters hand-delivered by the Rouse Co. to dozens of Columbia merchants yesterday afternoon.
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