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Shopping Malls

BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho h and Hanah Cho h,anah.cho@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
Faced with rising food and other costs, plummeting retirement assets and fears about job security, shoppers said they tempered their spending at Baltimore-area shopping malls and other retail spots yesterday while marking the traditional kickoff to the holiday buying season. Familiar "Black Friday" scenes of die-hard shoppers camped out before dawn for bargains on electronics, long lines at cash registers and packed parking lots were seen throughout the day. But many shoppers said they plan to spend less, wait for prices to drop even more and purchase gifts for a smaller number of friends and family.
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NEWS
August 29, 1996
ONCE, people went to shopping malls to buy clothes, books and many other things. But these retail complexes have evolved from mere shopping meccas into community centers.All sorts of non-shopping activities have become part of the mall experience. They range from senior citizens who show up in squads to take their morning stroll in air-conditioned splendor to teen-agers who congregate at night and weekends in search of some action.A recent story in The Sun about Charlotte Davis and Jeff Rogers offered more evidence of this transformation of regional malls.
NEWS
June 19, 1991
Shopping malls are used for so much these days, from Girl Scout encampments to organized exercise walking. Malls are even tourist attractions: Water Tower Place in Chicago, Union Station in Indianapolis, Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco, Harborplace in Baltimore.Can we reasonably expect malls to function as art galleries? This year, the Columbia Festival of the Arts added a visual arts component, arranging for an exhibit at the Columbia Mall. The Rouse Co., which runs the mall, decided to place restrictions on art "which explores human forms in the nude whether they are sexually explicit or not; which has obscene writings or images; that suggests the use of violent behavior."
NEWS
April 22, 2013
Just when you thought Annapolis had run out of new ways to tax us, now we're all going to be hit again with the accurately named "rain tax" ("Anger grows over stormwater fees," April 16). Of course, the editors of The Sun think this is just wonderful and sorely needed to pay for all the new storm drains, collection ponds, stream restorations and so on mandated the E.P.A. Funny though, how it was only a couple of years ago that we were told the major cause of pollution in the bay was manure from chicken farms and agricultural run-off on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
November 15 is America Recycles Day, a time for us to reflect on our successes and examine where we can do better when it comes to recycling. The good news is that residential recycling rates have increased dramatically during the last few decades. That's an achievement we should all celebrate. And in a recent national survey, a majority of Americans said recycling makes them feel proud. That shouldn't be surprising. After all, recycling is a simple yet powerful way to save huge amounts of energy and conserve natural resources.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Affluent shoppers with a penchant for Gucci handbags and Prada shoes might soon be able to swipe their gold cards again and again along one short stretch of the South Florida seaboard. The Rouse Co., the Columbia-based retail company, said yesterday that it settled a 2-year-old lawsuit in which it had contended that a competing mall was illegally preventing some of the world's best-known purveyors of upscale goods from also locating in a new Rouse mall 14 miles away. Rouse plans a September opening for Village of Merrick Park in Coral Gables, Fla., recently touted by the company as a premier member of its portfolio.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
The Rouse Co. reported a gain yesterday in funds from operations. But taking into account almost $52 million in one-time charges, the company lost money in the fourth quarter. The charges stem from a corporate reorganization, which will spill over into this year, and declining values of shopping malls in New Jersey and Florida. The malls accounted for $39 million of the charges. Analysts said the charges were appropriate and that the quarterly loss was not significant. "We were impressed with the quarter," said David Fick, a managing director and Rouse analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc., who criticized last year the way the company accounted in its funds from operations for the charges from corporate restructuring.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 18, 1992
After listening to an hour of virulent anti-smoking testimony Mondaynight, Rouse spokesman James D. Lano almost seemed ready to cry "uncle."Would the County Council be willing to accept a compromise ona proposal by C. Vernon Gray, D-6th, to ban smoking in enclosed shopping malls, he asked.Lano, assistant general counsel at the Rouse Co., suggested that smoking areas on the first floor of The Mall in Columbia near eating pavilions be eliminated and that smoking be allowed in special areas on the second floor only.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Eight village centers at the heart of James W. Rouse's vision for a new suburban city are being sold with other major Columbia retailing hubs as the Rouse Co. shifts its focus away from the community it created out of 14,000 acres of Howard County farmland. Rouse is selling a majority interest in the properties to Kimco Realty Corp. of New Hyde Park, N.Y. The price of the deal, to be completed in 30 to 60 days, was not disclosed. The news arrived in letters hand-delivered by the Rouse Co. to dozens of Columbia merchants yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Frank Taliaferro, a founder and former chairman of the RTKL architects recalled as the "soul" of that firm, died of lung cancer Saturday at his Santa Monica, Calif., home. The former resident of Harwood in Anne Arundel County was 89. Remembered as a mentor to numerous designers at RTKL, Mr. Taliaferro led architects who refined old retail strip centers and finessed them into shopping malls, including Harundale in Glen Burnie and Paramus Park in New Jersey, known for its early food court.
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