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NEWS
November 14, 2013
November 15 is America Recycles Day, a time for us to reflect on our successes and examine where we can do better when it comes to recycling. The good news is that residential recycling rates have increased dramatically during the last few decades. That's an achievement we should all celebrate. And in a recent national survey, a majority of Americans said recycling makes them feel proud. That shouldn't be surprising. After all, recycling is a simple yet powerful way to save huge amounts of energy and conserve natural resources.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Affluent shoppers with a penchant for Gucci handbags and Prada shoes might soon be able to swipe their gold cards again and again along one short stretch of the South Florida seaboard. The Rouse Co., the Columbia-based retail company, said yesterday that it settled a 2-year-old lawsuit in which it had contended that a competing mall was illegally preventing some of the world's best-known purveyors of upscale goods from also locating in a new Rouse mall 14 miles away. Rouse plans a September opening for Village of Merrick Park in Coral Gables, Fla., recently touted by the company as a premier member of its portfolio.
NEWS
June 19, 1991
Shopping malls are used for so much these days, from Girl Scout encampments to organized exercise walking. Malls are even tourist attractions: Water Tower Place in Chicago, Union Station in Indianapolis, Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco, Harborplace in Baltimore.Can we reasonably expect malls to function as art galleries? This year, the Columbia Festival of the Arts added a visual arts component, arranging for an exhibit at the Columbia Mall. The Rouse Co., which runs the mall, decided to place restrictions on art "which explores human forms in the nude whether they are sexually explicit or not; which has obscene writings or images; that suggests the use of violent behavior."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
The Rouse Co. reported a gain yesterday in funds from operations. But taking into account almost $52 million in one-time charges, the company lost money in the fourth quarter. The charges stem from a corporate reorganization, which will spill over into this year, and declining values of shopping malls in New Jersey and Florida. The malls accounted for $39 million of the charges. Analysts said the charges were appropriate and that the quarterly loss was not significant. "We were impressed with the quarter," said David Fick, a managing director and Rouse analyst at Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc., who criticized last year the way the company accounted in its funds from operations for the charges from corporate restructuring.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | March 18, 1992
After listening to an hour of virulent anti-smoking testimony Mondaynight, Rouse spokesman James D. Lano almost seemed ready to cry "uncle."Would the County Council be willing to accept a compromise ona proposal by C. Vernon Gray, D-6th, to ban smoking in enclosed shopping malls, he asked.Lano, assistant general counsel at the Rouse Co., suggested that smoking areas on the first floor of The Mall in Columbia near eating pavilions be eliminated and that smoking be allowed in special areas on the second floor only.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Eight village centers at the heart of James W. Rouse's vision for a new suburban city are being sold with other major Columbia retailing hubs as the Rouse Co. shifts its focus away from the community it created out of 14,000 acres of Howard County farmland. Rouse is selling a majority interest in the properties to Kimco Realty Corp. of New Hyde Park, N.Y. The price of the deal, to be completed in 30 to 60 days, was not disclosed. The news arrived in letters hand-delivered by the Rouse Co. to dozens of Columbia merchants yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Harry J. Herman Sr., a Southeast Baltimore baker who expanded a corner Canton shop into a business with more than $2 million in annual sales, died of cancer Friday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 85. He was known for his variation on strawberry shortcake, in which he broke with custom and substituted a sweet yellow layer cake for traditional shortcake. His version caught on, as did his belief in bakery branches in neighborhoods -- and later shopping malls -- where he saw his customers moving.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
Some shopping malls are taking a cue from their big-box retail competitors by opening their doors earlier and leaving them unlocked a little bit later. Many retail consultants believe General Growth Properties' decision last month to expand its hours at most of its more than 200 malls across the country - including several in the Baltimore area - could mark the beginning of a trend for the nation's shopping centers. The Chicago-based company is adding a few hours on weekend mornings and evenings in hopes of drawing more shoppers who say they want the added convenience.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | January 22, 1992
Last month, a group of Odenton residents gathered in a church to talk about building the ideal hometown.Some wanted a quiet retirement village. Others wanted a transportation hub. Still others wanted tosee a better pedestrian walkway system.Tonight, the residents will be asked their thoughts on four central questions that came out of the last discussion:* Should Odenton become a bedroom community or a full-service community, with churches, recreation areas and businesses?* What should Odenton look like?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
Whenever Tia Arnold wants a night on the town - to grab a bite to eat, say, or catch a film - she just has to step out her front door and stroll across the parking lot to The Mall in Columbia. The spacious brick townhouse she shares with her parents is just one house back from the busy two-lane "ring road" around the shopping center. "It's great because I can walk to the movies really quick," says Arnold, 33, who spends much of her week on the road training cosmetics salespeople. Time was, only in cities and towns could people live within walking distance of shops, restaurants and nightlife.
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