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BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1990 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | February 27, 1991
Fifteen years ago, the Lakes Mall in Lauderdale Lakes, Fla., was a showplace. It isn't anymore.Instead, it is a stark example of a decline in suburban enclosed malls. The decline is expected to continue far into the future.Back in the middle to late 1970s, the Lakes Mall was like popular, modern malls everywhere: One or more big "anchor" stores owned by giant department store chains, a multi-screen movie theater, a food market, a sizable pharmacy and dozens of smaller specialty shops. The place was crowded each day from the moment it opened to the moment it closed.
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BUSINESS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Skateboarding apparel store Zumiez included "mall violence" in its annual report of business risks released Tuesday, after a January shooting at The Mall in Columbia left two employees dead. "Most of our stores are located in shopping malls," the Washington state-based company wrote. "Any threat of terrorist attacks or actual terrorist events, or other types of mall violence, such as shootings in malls, particularly in public areas, could lead to lower customer traffic in shopping malls.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
First, they killed Main Street. Now shopping malls are bringing it back to suburbia.When Rebecca and Richard Maltz wanted to buy a house recently, they went to The Mall in Columbia. When Christina Norico needs a baby sitter, she drops off her toddler at Owings Mills Mall. And when Ann Bailey needed to correct her nearsightedness, she, too, found help at the Columbia mall.That aging, concrete dinosaur -- the shopping mall -- is being remade into a place that not only sells the perfect pair of shoes but also offers hospital clinics, church services, laser eye surgery and online stock trading.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
November 15 is America Recycles Day, a time for us to reflect on our successes and examine where we can do better when it comes to recycling. The good news is that residential recycling rates have increased dramatically during the last few decades. That's an achievement we should all celebrate. And in a recent national survey, a majority of Americans said recycling makes them feel proud. That shouldn't be surprising. After all, recycling is a simple yet powerful way to save huge amounts of energy and conserve natural resources.
NEWS
By Glenn Garvin and Glenn Garvin,MIAMI HERALD | February 23, 1999
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- Uh-oh, another victim riding to certain doom. Clear across the shopping mall, you can see the terror in her eyes, a middle-aged woman frozen on the metal stairs as they glide upward, upward -- and now, with the end near, she leaps!Skidding across the floor of the food court, she knocks over a large metal ashtray, spilling sand everywhere, before coming safely (sort of) to rest against a wall.Bystanders, pursing their lips, nod appreciatively. One more brave Nicaraguan has survived her first trip on an escalator.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
As chief executive officer, Gordon Becker sets an example for his staff by wearing Santa Claus cuff links and, at times, a red, fur-trimmed hat to match. His company markets itself with the tag line "Making reindeer fly." Major departments are Christmas and Easter, and a corporate conference room is trimmed in holly, wreaths and bows most months.For Baltimore-based Becker Group, founded more than four decades ago, Christmas is no holiday. It's year-round work, with more than $22 million in sales and hundreds of clients as far-flung as Brazil, Paris and Tokyo.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2004
PITTSBURGH - The staples of suburban mall shopping are present: GAP, Brooks Brothers and T.G.I Fridays. Then, there's an actual Staples office supply store. But something is different here. The aisles between the 100 or so shops are strangely wide. Most of the bags people carry have wheels. And the shoppers come and go by airplane. It's the Pittsburgh International Airport Airmall - the nation's first mall-style airport concession and a highly profitable retailing success that the managers of Baltimore-Washington International Airport hope to imitate.
BUSINESS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Skateboarding apparel store Zumiez included "mall violence" in its annual report of business risks released Tuesday, after a January shooting at The Mall in Columbia left two employees dead. "Most of our stores are located in shopping malls," the Washington state-based company wrote. "Any threat of terrorist attacks or actual terrorist events, or other types of mall violence, such as shootings in malls, particularly in public areas, could lead to lower customer traffic in shopping malls.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
ISSUE: -- After a teenager killed eight people and then himself in a Nebraska mall, local malls are trying to send a message that their shopping centers are safe. Cpl. Mark Shawkey, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Police Department, said the shooting didn't prompt additional policing efforts. "It's heightened their awareness," Shawkey said of the officers and security guards who patrol shopping centers. "They're more in tune and will be on the lookout for those types of things, especially groups congregating in the food court and other parts of the mall."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Fresh off closing the company's largest deal ever, Anthony W. Deering, chairman and chief executive of Columbia-based Rouse Co., told more than 600 shareholders yesterday that 2002 would be a good year. Last Friday's closing came just in time for Deering, whose company sold 16.7 million shares of stock to help pay for an interest in eight premier shopping malls, thereby diluting the value of the stock. He was able to report to shareholders yesterday that, although the acquisitions took longer than expected, income from them will immediately begin to offset the slight loss they had felt.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
Just when you thought Annapolis had run out of new ways to tax us, now we're all going to be hit again with the accurately named "rain tax" ("Anger grows over stormwater fees," April 16). Of course, the editors of The Sun think this is just wonderful and sorely needed to pay for all the new storm drains, collection ponds, stream restorations and so on mandated the E.P.A. Funny though, how it was only a couple of years ago that we were told the major cause of pollution in the bay was manure from chicken farms and agricultural run-off on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 6, 2012
Michael? Michael, honey? It's mom. No. Not your mom. Not Debbie Phelps. But I am the mother of a couple of kids just your age, and I thought I'd offer you the advice I'd give them if they were about to step into an unfamiliar world. You have spent most of every day in a pool since you were 11 years old, and you are retiring from that life at the ripe old age of 27 as the most decorated Olympic athlete and the greatest swimmer of all time. Your future is a blank screen. You are rich and you are famous, and so you must be careful if you do not want to follow other famous athletes into scandal or financial ruin.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
Matthew Waylett has put down his cocktail to adjust the tilt of an Indiana Jones-esque fedora, admiring his reflection in the mirror set up at the bar. It's Men's Night Out at the Manor Tavern, and Waylett has been lured to the shopping event, not so much by the chance to buy as the promise of cigars, free-flowing bourbon and a steak dinner. "You won't catch me dead in a mall," says the Monkton man, back in his own John Deere cap. "But when you bring whiskey into the equation …" With its first Men's Night Out, the Baltimore County tavern joins what's looking like a nationwide experiment in testosterone-fueled retail this holiday season.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
Dozens of people were evacuated from businesses near a large Anne Arundel County mall Tuesday morning after a cylinder carrying 250 gallons of highly flammable propane began leaking. The leak erupted when the cylinder fell from a forklift and broke a valve, according to a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. The incident occurred shortly after 9 a.m. on the construction site of a LongHorn Steakhouse restaurant on Arundel Mills Circle in Hanover. People within a half-mile radius of the site — most of them in businesses — were told to leave the area, said the spokesman, Capt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
The Red Parrot Asian Bistro in Hanover - the community in Anne Arundel County, not Pennsylvania - has good food in a bland setting. It is a restaurant that specializes in Southeast Asian fare. The setting, a glassy corner building in a mall just off the Baltimore- Washington Parkway, is less than uplifting. The service, young men and women clad in black, is spotty. The fare, however, has taste and substance. Red Parrot is one of the tenants of a shopping center that has sprung up on Dorchester Boulevard and Arundel Mills Boulevard, not far from the mother of all malls, Arundel Mills.
NEWS
April 5, 2009
In less than a year, the prospect of saving Maryland's racing industry with an infusion of slots dollars has become something of a mirage. The owner of the state's biggest tracks is in bankruptcy court, the promise of robust gaming parlors is iffy and the future of the Preakness Stakes is fuzzy. And the latest interested buyer of Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park wants to build shopping malls on their grassy environs and says he'll pay for the tracks - in cash. After years of debate over legalizing slots in Maryland, voters overwhelmingly approved them (granted, the recession and the state's deep budget woes helped)
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
In a marketing stunt that could have been dreamed up by shopping mall pop queen Tiffany and Internet savvy political operative Joe Trippi, singer-songwriter Avril Lavigne this spring will take part in a "flash-mob" concert tour. The appearances - to be held in shopping malls - are part of the publicity blitz surrounding her next record, Under My Skin, which will be released in late May. "Flash mobs," popular last summer among hipsters and computer geeks, are rooted in Internet culture where blogging and electronic message boards rule.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
From around the region come alarming stories of charities running dry at a crucial time of year. Carroll County's Neighbors in Need program had hoped to help 1,200 families this year. But as of last week the group had to tell volunteers not to bother to come in to pack holiday food boxes -- there wasn't enough food to fill them.As The Sun's Liz Atwood reported earlier this week, charities in Anne Arundel County and Harford County also are reporting similar shortfalls. Meanwhile, the United Way is struggling to recoup from a disappointing year, both nationally and here in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho h and Hanah Cho h,anah.cho@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
Faced with rising food and other costs, plummeting retirement assets and fears about job security, shoppers said they tempered their spending at Baltimore-area shopping malls and other retail spots yesterday while marking the traditional kickoff to the holiday buying season. Familiar "Black Friday" scenes of die-hard shoppers camped out before dawn for bargains on electronics, long lines at cash registers and packed parking lots were seen throughout the day. But many shoppers said they plan to spend less, wait for prices to drop even more and purchase gifts for a smaller number of friends and family.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
ISSUE: -- After a teenager killed eight people and then himself in a Nebraska mall, local malls are trying to send a message that their shopping centers are safe. Cpl. Mark Shawkey, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County Police Department, said the shooting didn't prompt additional policing efforts. "It's heightened their awareness," Shawkey said of the officers and security guards who patrol shopping centers. "They're more in tune and will be on the lookout for those types of things, especially groups congregating in the food court and other parts of the mall."
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