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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Opposed to shopping on Thanksgiving Day, Betty Allen of West Friendship waited until midnight to head to Walmart in Ellicott City for $2 DVDs and then shopped through the night without crowds to buy boots and clothing for her four children with stops at Kohl's, Target, Macy's and J.C. Penney. "It has been different this year," said Allen. "I'm used to lining up outside and rushing in. " Black Friday, the traditional kickoff to the holiday retail season, drew smaller-than-usual hordes of bargain hunters in the Baltimore area, probably because earlier Thanksgiving sales and staggered "limited supply" discounts spread shoppers out. Some shoppers missed the frenzy, while others embraced the relative calm.
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BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, Alison Knezevich, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Anna Szuba of Pasadena shopped on Thanksgiving last year -- two hours in line to get in the store and three hours in line to get out. No thanks, she said. This year she started around midnight Friday and worked through her gift list among much smaller crowds. Black Friday is drawing shoppers this year as always, but it's a far more sedate scene locally and nationally with the continuing rise of Thanksgiving sales. Szuba appreciates it. She went to three stores after finishing a late shift at work, and by 5:30 a.m. at Toys R Us in Glen Burnie, she was about done.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 25, 2013
Please join me in not buying a darn thing this Thanksgiving Day. Have an extra piece of pie, take a nap, watch a little football, drink too much, fight with your in-laws. Just don't shop. "Black Friday creep," as they called it when it began a couple of years ago, has crept all the way into Thanksgiving Day, with at least one retailer opening before dawn Thursday and several others staying open straight through until Friday at midnight. There is a finite amount of Christmas money out there each year, and stores are racing to the front of the line to grab yours.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Although the traditional start to the holiday shopping season is still days away, Morgan Somerville has already mapped out her bargain-hunting strategy. The student employment manager at Stevenson University will pass up Thanksgiving specials to focus on Black Friday deals for gifts and household items for her new Towson home. On Small Business Saturday, she'll help out at her mother's gift shop. Then on Cyber Monday, she'll watch email and social media for deep discounts from retailers such as Vera Bradley.
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | November 14, 2013
Discount grocer ALDI is reopening its remodeled Edgewood store on Friday, Nov. 15. "We are pleased to showcase the new look of ALDI with this updated store in Edgewood and continue to help customers stretch their dollars," said Jeff Baehr, Frederick division vice president for ALDI, in a news release. "As important as price is," he continued, "there's only one way to attract and keep shoppers: You have to have quality products. When people try our ALDI exclusive brands, they are excited by the savings and impressed by the quality.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Thomas Gallagher tried to steer his daughter toward one of the less-pricey costumes at Spirit Halloween in Glen Burnie. But then the 5-year-old spied the Snow White get-up. Too late. Gallagher ended up spending about $40 at the store last week on a glittery tulle gown for his daughter, Kaelyn Gallagher, which the kindergartner plans to wear trick-or-treating Thursday. "I told her she could pick out anything," the Hanover father said. "But I was hoping it would be one of the cheaper ones.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
When Amazon.com opens a huge distribution center next year in Southeast Baltimore, consumers across the state who buy books, electronics, toys or anything else from the online seller will no longer be able to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax. Consumers might not like it, but that's just fine with many retailers in Maryland, who say the online giant enjoyed that competitive advantage for too long. Seattle-based Amazon announced plans Tuesday to open a 1 million-square-foot warehouse that will employ 1,000 full-time workers at the site of the former General Motors plan on Broening Highway, a move welcomed by city and state officials.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 15, 2013
 Most consumers will spend the same as or more than last year on holiday shopping, the NPD Group Inc. reported late Tuesday. The group's annual holiday spending survey showed that nearly 80 percent of shoppers will spend about the same or more compared to the 2012 holiday season. About a fifth of those polled said they plan to spend less this year. “Consumers are feeling better about the economy compared to last year and they plan to take advantage of sales during key periods,” said Marshal Cohen, NPD's chief industry analyst.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
Like many Baltimoreans, we were saddened by the recent announcement that Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown plans to close its doors at the end of the month and lay off more than 80 employees. Santoni's has been a venerable neighborhood institution since the 1930s, and over that time it has built a loyal following among customers. These are difficult times for small businesses of all kinds, and particularly for independent grocers who operate on thin margins and face increasing competition not only from traditional chains like Giant, Safeway and Harris Teeter but also from discount warehouses and stores like Walmart and Target.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Liz Derubertis browsed stores at Arundel Mills mall Wednesday in search of a dress to wear to a wedding. The 26-year-old bartender and University of Maryland, Baltimore County student never shops for clothes online. "I'm too particular about the fit, and I don't want to take the time to send it back," said Derubertis of Ellicott City. "I like being out, being in the crowds and perusing and seeing what's being offered - and people-watching. " Just as video did not kill the radio star, the Internet won't kill the shopping mall any time soon.
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