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Shooting War

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NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH and TROY MCCULLOUGH,SUN COLUMNIST | June 11, 2006
The grim, near-future world outlined in Shooting War, a compelling new serialized online graphic novel, is not hard to imagine - a world where terrorist bombings on American soil are routine, sectarian chaos in Iraq has spread far beyond its borders, an Islamic insurgency has evolved to be as media-savvy as it is ruthless, and a blogger finds himself thrust onto the world stage by a salivating global news corporation after bearing witness to the latest...
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NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH and TROY MCCULLOUGH,SUN COLUMNIST | June 11, 2006
The grim, near-future world outlined in Shooting War, a compelling new serialized online graphic novel, is not hard to imagine - a world where terrorist bombings on American soil are routine, sectarian chaos in Iraq has spread far beyond its borders, an Islamic insurgency has evolved to be as media-savvy as it is ruthless, and a blogger finds himself thrust onto the world stage by a salivating global news corporation after bearing witness to the latest...
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- While hopes are rising here that Iraq's decision to release all hostages may avert war in the Persian Gulf, key Democratic legislators are talking in concerned tones about the emergence of a "constitutional crisis" if President Bush starts a shooting war without seeking a declaration of war from Congress.They acknowledge that once such a war starts the practical imperative of supporting American forces in the field would make it extremely difficult to pursue a case against the president as a usurper of Congress' constitutional power.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and Stephanie Shapiro and David Zurawik and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
Television coverage of the war in Iraq crossed a new threshold this week when network and cable news channels aired footage of an American Marine as he shot to death an apparently unarmed and wounded Iraqi insurgent who lay in a Fallujah mosque. It was the first time that a videotaped image has been televised of any U.S. military personnel killing an Iraqi. Recorded Saturday by an NBC cameraman embedded with a Marine battalion, the tape, which initially aired Monday as many Americans sat down to dinner, depicted Marines entering a mosque in which five insurgents lay wounded following an earlier encounter with U.S. troops.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | January 17, 1991
And so, the war begins.Allied forces attacked Iraqi positions in the Persian Gulf about 7 p.m. yesterday. Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm.Shortly after the attack began, anti-war protests here began to escalate."A student called our offices and told us about it," said Sharon Ceci, local co-chair of the Coalition to Stop U.S. Intervention in the Middle East. "We confirmed it with our national offices. And right after that, we started calling everyone in our local network."
NEWS
By Douglas Jehl and Douglas Jehl,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 1990
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- In a change in U.S. military strategy, senior commanders considering a possible offensive action against Iraq now favor a slower, more methodical assault on dug-in Iraqi defenders instead of a rapid, all-out battle as soon as war begins.The new approach, outlined by high-ranking officers here, reflects concerns that immediately launch ing a comprehensive air and ground offensive against what are now well-fortified Iraqi positions could result in unacceptable losses of American lives.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 18, 1991
BUSH ADMINISTRATION economists are astonishingly sanguine about the economic costs of a Persian Gulf war. They have convinced themselves and the president that a war, to be won in a few brisk weeks, will be tonic for the economy. After the rousing victory, oil prices will tumble, consumer confidence will return, short-circuiting the recession.The actual costs, of course, will depend on the contours of the actual war. But whatever happens, the costs will not be trivial, nor will they all be immediately obvious.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A practical political result of President Bush launching a shooting war, after congressional debate and acquiescence, has been to put disagreement with the war off limits for most elected officeholders who want a political future. It is not enough for them to say they support the troops in the field; they have to support Bush as well, or likely be cast as doing neither.While it is understandable that this is so, there is something basically disingenuous about politicians now embracing the war who believed in all sincerity that it was a major mistake to go to war rather than give economic sanctions more time to work.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 29, 2004
WASHINGTON -- There was a time when the Pentagon worried about passing a national exam on war. It was called "The Dover Test." Any decision to go to war had to take into account how long the public would tolerate pictures of coffins coming back through Dover Air Force Base. Not anymore. Now we just ban the pictures. This ban came back into public notice after the Air Force mistakenly released photos of flag-draped coffins, which ended up on a Web site called The Memory Hole. A few days earlier, the Maytag Aircraft Corp.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and Stephanie Shapiro and David Zurawik and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2004
Television coverage of the war in Iraq crossed a new threshold this week when network and cable news channels aired footage of an American Marine as he shot to death an apparently unarmed and wounded Iraqi insurgent who lay in a Fallujah mosque. It was the first time that a videotaped image has been televised of any U.S. military personnel killing an Iraqi. Recorded Saturday by an NBC cameraman embedded with a Marine battalion, the tape, which initially aired Monday as many Americans sat down to dinner, depicted Marines entering a mosque in which five insurgents lay wounded following an earlier encounter with U.S. troops.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 29, 2004
WASHINGTON -- There was a time when the Pentagon worried about passing a national exam on war. It was called "The Dover Test." Any decision to go to war had to take into account how long the public would tolerate pictures of coffins coming back through Dover Air Force Base. Not anymore. Now we just ban the pictures. This ban came back into public notice after the Air Force mistakenly released photos of flag-draped coffins, which ended up on a Web site called The Memory Hole. A few days earlier, the Maytag Aircraft Corp.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
MOSCOW - It's starting to sink in here that the U.S. Army has showed up at an air base in Uzbekistan, and the news has stirred mixed feelings of alarm, astonishment and foreboding. And there's also a line of thought that says: This is not a price that Russia is paying for its newfound alliance with America, but a benefit it is receiving. The American soldiers down there in the unstable southern flank of the old Soviet Union, this argument goes, do not pose a threat to Russian influence and in fact are defending Russian interests.
NEWS
September 16, 1995
For years after World War II, tales spread of Japanese soldiers holed up on remote islands, unwilling to concede the war was over. In that tradition, someone forgot to tell the anti-air command controllers of Belarus that the Cold War was over and that a giant balloon drifting near a military base was strictly non-belligerent.The balloon, manned by two Americans, was one of 17 competing in a famous balloon race launched three days earlier in Switzerland. Whoever goes farthest in any direction wins.
NEWS
July 22, 1992
Women are now the fastest-growing group of handgun purchasers -- a development that some have applauded as evidence of a new-found self-confidence and determination on the part of women not to be victimized on the basis of gender.Yet there's a dark side to this trend, too: Recent studies suggest that women who own guns are far more likely to use them against a spouse or boyfriend than against a stranger. Put another way, while the motivation for a woman to buy a gun may be to protect herself against anonymous "criminals," the actual person she is most likely to end up shooting is a husband or lover.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A practical political result of President Bush launching a shooting war, after congressional debate and acquiescence, has been to put disagreement with the war off limits for most elected officeholders who want a political future. It is not enough for them to say they support the troops in the field; they have to support Bush as well, or likely be cast as doing neither.While it is understandable that this is so, there is something basically disingenuous about politicians now embracing the war who believed in all sincerity that it was a major mistake to go to war rather than give economic sanctions more time to work.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 18, 1991
BUSH ADMINISTRATION economists are astonishingly sanguine about the economic costs of a Persian Gulf war. They have convinced themselves and the president that a war, to be won in a few brisk weeks, will be tonic for the economy. After the rousing victory, oil prices will tumble, consumer confidence will return, short-circuiting the recession.The actual costs, of course, will depend on the contours of the actual war. But whatever happens, the costs will not be trivial, nor will they all be immediately obvious.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
Is war the only alternative that remains?Is war the only alternative to the madness of an aberrant mind leading a nation to another world war? When the leader of a nation is determined to loot, pillage, disperse and kill the inhabitants of another and insist on absorbing it as a province of his own territory, then war after warnings and attempted mediation unfortunately does become the only alternative.It is sad that today's world, which ignored such signs before World War II, only now realizes it will pay a far more severe price later if aggression is allowed to go unchecked.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2001
MOSCOW - It's starting to sink in here that the U.S. Army has showed up at an air base in Uzbekistan, and the news has stirred mixed feelings of alarm, astonishment and foreboding. And there's also a line of thought that says: This is not a price that Russia is paying for its newfound alliance with America, but a benefit it is receiving. The American soldiers down there in the unstable southern flank of the old Soviet Union, this argument goes, do not pose a threat to Russian influence and in fact are defending Russian interests.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | January 17, 1991
And so, the war begins.Allied forces attacked Iraqi positions in the Persian Gulf about 7 p.m. yesterday. Operation Desert Shield became Operation Desert Storm.Shortly after the attack began, anti-war protests here began to escalate."A student called our offices and told us about it," said Sharon Ceci, local co-chair of the Coalition to Stop U.S. Intervention in the Middle East. "We confirmed it with our national offices. And right after that, we started calling everyone in our local network."
NEWS
January 15, 1991
Is war the only alternative that remains?Is war the only alternative to the madness of an aberrant mind leading a nation to another world war? When the leader of a nation is determined to loot, pillage, disperse and kill the inhabitants of another and insist on absorbing it as a province of his own territory, then war after warnings and attempted mediation unfortunately does become the only alternative.It is sad that today's world, which ignored such signs before World War II, only now realizes it will pay a far more severe price later if aggression is allowed to go unchecked.
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