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By Ann Hellmuth and Ann Hellmuth,Orlando Sentinel | May 11, 1993
The Strauns, those ruthless, money-grabbing empire builders, are back, providing another invaluable lesson in Far Eastern culture and history. And this time, novelist James Clavell returns to the roots of his Asian saga -- Japan, the land of "Shogun.""Gai-Jin," the Japanese word for foreigners, is set in 1862 -- 100 years before "Noble House" and some 20 years after the buccaneering Dirk Straun ("Tai-Pan") helped cut the deal that led to the founding of Hong Kong.Straun's Noble House, based on the history of the trading company Jardine Matheson, is threatened once more by its bitter rival, Brock and Sons, which has cornered the Hawaiian sugar trade and is pressuring bankers to call in the Straun family's loans.
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By Cody Goodwin and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
A 44-year-old fighter sat on top of a cage with his arms in the air and a smile on his face. Moments earlier, he was looking down at his opponent, who had fallen limp to the ground after taking a punch straight to the head. James "Binky" Jones had to make sure that Biff Walizer, his opponent that October 2013 day in Shogun Fights IX, was done for good. He stared for a couple more seconds, then threw his arms up and ran to climb the cage and flex for his fans. "The Lord has blessed me, man," Jones, of Baltimore, said Thursday.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 19, 1994
If I knew how to spell a great big yawn, that would be my lead for tonight -- because that's what tonight's broadcast TV schedule deserves. Cable offers some solace, but not too much.* "I Witness Video." (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Personally, I do not witness "Video." But if you check this out tonight, you'll see boaters encountering killer whales. NBC repeat.* "NFL Football." (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBFF, Channel 45) -- Last week's premiere of Fox football introduced one or two interesting variations on the televised football theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
For years, mixed martial art has been a man's world. But 2013 is shaping up to be the year women take the spotlight. Ronda Rousey beat Liz Carmouche in February, during Ultimate Fighting Championship's first female bout. And this weekend, Shogun Fights VIII will host the first female professional mixed martial arts fight in Maryland. On Saturday, Rosanna Garcia and Gabrielle Holloway will face off at Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena , as the co-main event on the card - an event that could open doors for women in the sport and ultimately allow for more female professional fights locally.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 26, 1996
Shogun has a new name, and the owners haven't quite decided how to pronounce it yet. The Japanese restaurant at 316 N. Charles St. is now Jpn. (The period is part of the name.) Why the change? One of the principals has retired, and to avoid legal tangles, says co-owner John Pletcher, he and the remaining partner, Shuzo Nonouchi, decided on the new name.Nonouchi, also the chef, is taking the change as an opportunity to branch out from Shogun's traditional Japanese cuisine. Look for the addition of more of his own creations on the menu soon.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 10, 1990
Japan in 1600 -- when "Shogun, The Musical" takes place -- must have seemed exotic to Westerners. But this new musical looks remarkably familiar. In large part, it looks like a Japanese "Les Miserables."Where "Les Mis" used a central turntable as a scenic device, "Shogun" uses a conveyor belt. And near the end of the first act, when the ensemble marches in a wedge formation with red flags flying, "Shogun" -- currently playing a pre-Broadway run at the Kennedy Center -- looks like a kimono-clad version of "Red and Black," the crowd-rallying number in "Les Mis."
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By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1994
James Clavell, prolific author of epic best-selling novels such as "Shogun" and "Noble House," died yesterday at his home in Vevey, Switzerland. He was 69. His American publishers said he had suffered from cancer; his British publishers said he also had a stroke over the weekend.Although Mr. Clavell began his career as a screenwriter and director, he found his literary niche in thick novels. He penned at least five best sellers, beginning with "King Rat" in 1962, which was based on his experience in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. The others, all set in the Far East, included "Tai-Pan" "Shogun," "Noble House" and, just last year, "Gai-Jin."
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By Lou Cedrone | September 11, 1990
''Shogun, The Musical'' wants to be everything. It wants to be ''Phantom of the Opera,'' ''Cats'' and ''Les Miserables'' and it wants to be bigger than all those shows.In some ways, it is. In some, it is not. At present, this self-consciously spectacular musical, filling a pre-Broadway engagement at the Kennedy Center Opera House, needs prodigious tuning. When it first previewed at the Kennedy, the show was three hours and 20 minutes long. At present, it is three hours long.James Clavell, who wrote the two-volume novel in 1976 and is co-producing the musical, says they want to get it down to two hours and 40 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 23, 1998
Tom Washburn used to work for Alex. Brown, but he got bored. Lucky us. He's opened Moxley's (25 W. Allegheny Ave., Towson), an ice cream parlor named after his dog. What makes Moxley's unusual is that the ice cream is made on the premises.If you're thinking Nifty Fifties when I say ice cream parlor, think again. Moxley's is quite contemporary, with bright colors and funky decor.You can get sundaes, sodas, banana splits, milkshakes and root beer floats, just as you can at an old-fashioned ice-cream parlor.
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By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Roland Park Cafe The Sun Shogun The Sunday Sun | January 18, 1992
PierpointPierpoint, 1822 Aliceanna St., 675-2080. This small Fells Point restaurant offers an atmosphere that is sophisticated in a "new Baltimore" kind of way. The dining area is just two deep, narrow rooms with the first room occupied by the bar and a few tables. The aisles are thin; the decor spare; the colors muted; the tables almost too close together. The lean decor only serves to emphasize the food, which is sophisticated, but traditional, rooted in Maryland's rich culinary traditions.
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By Bailey O'Malia and For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
Shogun Fights has teamed up with the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter, also known as BARCS, to help sheltered animals in Baltimore. Shogun Fights is a mixed martial arts organization that showcases some of the most talented MMA fighters in Baltimore. And the MMA fighters aren't just tough on their opponents, they are also combating animal cruelty. Shogun Fights owner and former MMA fighter John Rallo began advocating for animals as a member of the "Show Your Soft Side" campaign.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 5, 2002
Stephen Sondheim has said that when he and John Weidman created their 1976 musical Pacific Overtures, they tried to adopt the viewpoint of a Japanese playwright. Proof of how magnificently they achieved this goal is currently on view in the breathtaking production imported to Washington from the New National Theatre, Tokyo, as the final offering in the Kennedy Center's Sondheim Celebration. An American seeing this production in Japan might well conclude it was the creation of a Japanese composer and librettist.
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By Jason Forrest and Jason Forrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2000
If you enjoy real-time strategy games such as "Command and Conquer" or "Starcraft," "Kessen" for the PlayStation 2 takes advantage of the new game machine's capabilities to set a standard for cinematic reality and detail. Developed by Koei - one of Japan's top publishers of historical simulations - "Kessen" is a one-player game set in feudal Japan, where it gives you control over the Battle of Sekigahara. Kessen means "decisive battle," and this particular struggle, which occurred in 1600, determined control over the country for the next two centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 23, 1998
Tom Washburn used to work for Alex. Brown, but he got bored. Lucky us. He's opened Moxley's (25 W. Allegheny Ave., Towson), an ice cream parlor named after his dog. What makes Moxley's unusual is that the ice cream is made on the premises.If you're thinking Nifty Fifties when I say ice cream parlor, think again. Moxley's is quite contemporary, with bright colors and funky decor.You can get sundaes, sodas, banana splits, milkshakes and root beer floats, just as you can at an old-fashioned ice-cream parlor.
NEWS
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,special to the sun | June 8, 1997
"Shadow Shoguns: The Rise and Fall of Japan's Postwar Political Machine," by Jacob M. Schlesinger. Simon & Schuster. 366 pages. $26.In "Shadow Shoguns," Jacob M. Schlesinger, a reporter with the Wall Street Journal's Tokyo bureau from 1989 to 1994, documents how Japanese postwar democracy, established by the U.S. occupation under Gen. Douglas MacArthur, degenerated into corrupt machine politics. Working within the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which headed every government from 1955 to 1993, a series of "shadow shoguns" or Tammany-Hall style bosses became the real rulers of Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 26, 1996
Shogun has a new name, and the owners haven't quite decided how to pronounce it yet. The Japanese restaurant at 316 N. Charles St. is now Jpn. (The period is part of the name.) Why the change? One of the principals has retired, and to avoid legal tangles, says co-owner John Pletcher, he and the remaining partner, Shuzo Nonouchi, decided on the new name.Nonouchi, also the chef, is taking the change as an opportunity to branch out from Shogun's traditional Japanese cuisine. Look for the addition of more of his own creations on the menu soon.
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By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Weber's on Boston The Sun Shogun The Sunday Sun | September 14, 1991
The Cove House RestaurantThe Cove House Restaurant, Routes 50 and 301, Grasonville, (301) 827-6300. It's difficult to believe how much a restaurant can have going for it when it's so close to a six-lane highway catering to the beach-bound and home-bound crowd. Except for the moderate din noticeable outside the front door, however, the Cove House seems more old Eastern Shore than new. From the airy dining room, the view is of a bucolic cove with only some ducks and an occasional boat moving in the evening.
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By Janice Baker | August 25, 1991
In a book titled "Japan in Transition," copyright 1899, Stafford Ransome, a reporter for the Morning Post in New York, remarked, "The best authorities agree generally that Japanese food is usually extremely clean, and is served artistically and most delicately; that some of it is rather eatable, but that most is extremely nasty to the taste; and I think that, with hardly one exception, they maintain that a European cannot live on it satisfactorily for...
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By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 1994
James Clavell, prolific author of epic best-selling novels such as "Shogun" and "Noble House," died yesterday at his home in Vevey, Switzerland. He was 69. His American publishers said he had suffered from cancer; his British publishers said he also had a stroke over the weekend.Although Mr. Clavell began his career as a screenwriter and director, he found his literary niche in thick novels. He penned at least five best sellers, beginning with "King Rat" in 1962, which was based on his experience in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. The others, all set in the Far East, included "Tai-Pan" "Shogun," "Noble House" and, just last year, "Gai-Jin."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 19, 1994
If I knew how to spell a great big yawn, that would be my lead for tonight -- because that's what tonight's broadcast TV schedule deserves. Cable offers some solace, but not too much.* "I Witness Video." (8-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Personally, I do not witness "Video." But if you check this out tonight, you'll see boaters encountering killer whales. NBC repeat.* "NFL Football." (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBFF, Channel 45) -- Last week's premiere of Fox football introduced one or two interesting variations on the televised football theme.
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