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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
An article on Rosh Hashana in yesterday's Howard County editions incorrectly reported the date of the new Jewish year. The correct year is 5754.The Sun regrets the error.When 7-year-old Hannah Chalew pulled the long, meaty bone from a boiled animal horn yesterday, her second-grade classmates responded with a resounding, "ee-YEW!""When I pulled out the bone, it was weird," said Hannah, who got HTC a close-up look at the making of a shofar, or ceremonial ram's horn blown on Jewish high holy days.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Ron Reitman remembers how silent his synagogue always gets at Rosh Hashana services, right before the shofar is sounded. "You could hear a pin drop, it's so quiet," he said. "Everyone stands at attention." Tomorrow, Reitman will blow the ceremonial ram's horn himself, in a less hushed environment: a hospital room. Reitman, a transportation planner who lives downtown, has been trained along with other volunteers to blow the shofar in time to bring this element of the Rosh Hashana celebration to Jews too sick to attend services.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Ron Reitman remembers how silent his synagogue always gets at Rosh Hashana services, right before the shofar is sounded. "You could hear a pin drop, it's so quiet," he said. "Everyone stands at attention." Tomorrow, Reitman will blow the ceremonial ram's horn himself, in a less hushed environment: a hospital room. Reitman, a transportation planner who lives downtown, has been trained along with other volunteers to blow the shofar in time to bring this element of the Rosh Hashana celebration to Jews too sick to attend services.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Beth Shalom Congregation in Columbia will herald its 36th anniversary in a traditional -- and loud -- way today with congregation members blowing 36 shofars. In biblical times, the shofar -- a ram's horn that makes a resonant sound -- was used to call a community together, said Beth Shalom Rabbi Susan Grossman. The trumpeting is meant to invite people "not just to celebrate our past, but also [serve] as a bridge to the future," she said. The congregation has grown from a handful of families to more than 400, and moved from holding services in individual homes to an interfaith center to the synagogue on Harriet Tubman Lane.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
Early Sunday morning, when the ram's horn shofar sounds the quaking cry of alarm and awakening, observant Jews everywhere begin a period of introspection and repentance that climaxes with Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur."
NEWS
By John Rivera | September 16, 1991
Students arriving for classes at the Beth El synagogue in Pikesville yesterday morning knew immediately when they walked through the door that something unusual was brewing. The pungent odor of boiling rams' horns was in the air, a rather unpleasant smell that resembled burning rubber.The horns were soon to be transformed into shofars -- the ceremonial horn that is blown to summon the faithful to the synagogue during the high holy days of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur -- by a class of seventh-graders studying for their bar mitzvahs later this year.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
Crop walk Oct. 9 at Centennial Park The Columbia Cooperative Ministry will hold its Howard County CROP WALK 2005 at 2 p.m. Oct. 9 at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Walkers will meet at Pavilion B in the park for the 2.3-mile walk around Centennial Lake. Those interested can walk or sponsor a walker. Crop walks are a national program of Church World Service. Funds raised are divided between local charities and Church World Service partners. The Columbia ministry's goal is to raise at least $10,000 with the walk.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
Beth Shalom Congregation in Columbia will herald its 36th anniversary in a traditional -- and loud -- way today with congregation members blowing 36 shofars. In biblical times, the shofar -- a ram's horn that makes a resonant sound -- was used to call a community together, said Beth Shalom Rabbi Susan Grossman. The trumpeting is meant to invite people "not just to celebrate our past, but also [serve] as a bridge to the future," she said. The congregation has grown from a handful of families to more than 400, and moved from holding services in individual homes to an interfaith center to the synagogue on Harriet Tubman Lane.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 10, 2002
OUTSIDE THE Beth Am Synagogue, 2501 Eutaw Place, four uniformed city police officers offered a comforting presence across an anxious weekend. On Sunday morning, one of them pointed to two large signs that stood like sentries for all those arriving to mark Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year. Here are the things, the signs declared, that cannot be brought into the synagogue this year: Packages. Large pocketbooks. Diaper bags. Strollers. Once associated purely with childhood innocence, diaper bags and strollers are now seen as potential transporters of doom.
FEATURES
By Nora Frenkiel | September 19, 1990
The blowing of the shofar -- the ram's horn -- that marks the observance of the Jewish High Holidays is not just a call to listen to what is going on in one's own world; it's a call to a larger sense of community."
NEWS
September 30, 2005
Crop walk Oct. 9 at Centennial Park The Columbia Cooperative Ministry will hold its Howard County CROP WALK 2005 at 2 p.m. Oct. 9 at Centennial Park in Ellicott City. Walkers will meet at Pavilion B in the park for the 2.3-mile walk around Centennial Lake. Those interested can walk or sponsor a walker. Crop walks are a national program of Church World Service. Funds raised are divided between local charities and Church World Service partners. The Columbia ministry's goal is to raise at least $10,000 with the walk.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 10, 2002
OUTSIDE THE Beth Am Synagogue, 2501 Eutaw Place, four uniformed city police officers offered a comforting presence across an anxious weekend. On Sunday morning, one of them pointed to two large signs that stood like sentries for all those arriving to mark Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new year. Here are the things, the signs declared, that cannot be brought into the synagogue this year: Packages. Large pocketbooks. Diaper bags. Strollers. Once associated purely with childhood innocence, diaper bags and strollers are now seen as potential transporters of doom.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
AS THE SOUND of the shofar ushers in the Jewish New Year this weekend, Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel will be packed. Big deal? Yes it is, because the 127-year-old congregation -- the only fully operational Orthodox synagogue in downtown Baltimore -- has staged an amazing turnaround. It's membership is growing, it has selected 25-year-old Shraga Goldenhersh as its new permanent rabbi, and it is preparing for a $1 million fund-raising drive to build a social hall. Many factors contribute to B'nai Israel's improved health: new residential construction around the harbor, a strong downtown job market, more interest in religion among students and faculty at the area's professional schools and research institutions.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
As a 14-year-old, given the privilege of blowing the shofar during Rosh Hashana services at a synagogue in his hometown, Omaha, Neb., it became clear to Rex Perlmeter what path he would follow.He would be a rabbi.That path took him to Princeton University, to rabbinical school in New York and to a synagogue in Miami, and has brought him to this city, as senior rabbi of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Maryland's oldest Jewish community.It was in blowing the shofar, a ceremonial trumpet made of a ram's horn, that Perlmeter's calling became crystallized in his mind.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
When 7-year-old Hannah Chalew pulled the long, meaty bone from a boiled animal horn yesterday, her second-grade classmates responded with a resounding, "ee-YEW!""When I pulled out the bone, it was weird," said Hannah, who got a close-up look at the making of a shofar, or ceremonial ram's horn blown on Jewish high holy days.She was among 58 students from the Krieger-Schechter Day School, a Jewish school in Baltimore County, who visited the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia for the eye-opening demonstration.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
An article on Rosh Hashana in yesterday's Howard County editions incorrectly reported the date of the new Jewish year. The correct year is 5754.The Sun regrets the error.When 7-year-old Hannah Chalew pulled the long, meaty bone from a boiled animal horn yesterday, her second-grade classmates responded with a resounding, "ee-YEW!""When I pulled out the bone, it was weird," said Hannah, who got HTC a close-up look at the making of a shofar, or ceremonial ram's horn blown on Jewish high holy days.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1996
As a 14-year-old, given the privilege of blowing the shofar during Rosh Hashana services at a synagogue in his hometown, Omaha, Neb., it became clear to Rex Perlmeter what path he would follow.He would be a rabbi.That path took him to Princeton University, to rabbinical school in New York and to a synagogue in Miami, and has brought him to this city, as senior rabbi of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Maryland's oldest Jewish community.It was in blowing the shofar, a ceremonial trumpet made of a ram's horn, that Perlmeter's calling became crystallized in his mind.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
When 7-year-old Hannah Chalew pulled the long, meaty bone from a boiled animal horn yesterday, her second-grade classmates responded with a resounding, "ee-YEW!""When I pulled out the bone, it was weird," said Hannah, who got a close-up look at the making of a shofar, or ceremonial ram's horn blown on Jewish high holy days.She was among 58 students from the Krieger-Schechter Day School, a Jewish school in Baltimore County, who visited the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia for the eye-opening demonstration.
NEWS
By John Rivera | September 16, 1991
Students arriving for classes at the Beth El synagogue in Pikesville yesterday morning knew immediately when they walked through the door that something unusual was brewing. The pungent odor of boiling rams' horns was in the air, a rather unpleasant smell that resembled burning rubber.The horns were soon to be transformed into shofars -- the ceremonial horn that is blown to summon the faithful to the synagogue during the high holy days of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur -- by a class of seventh-graders studying for their bar mitzvahs later this year.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
Early Sunday morning, when the ram's horn shofar sounds the quaking cry of alarm and awakening, observant Jews everywhere begin a period of introspection and repentance that climaxes with Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur."
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