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Shoemaker Levy

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By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
GREENBELT -- Astronomers said yesterday that they have detected, for the first time, the rocky debris of one of the comet fragments that smacked into Jupiter last week.Melissa McGrath, an astronomer with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, said the Hubble Space Telescope found magnesium, silicon and perhaps iron in the rust-colored plume kicked up after fragment "G" slammed into Jupiter's atmosphere early Monday morning.She said there are still no signs of water, deepening suspicion that Shoemaker-Levy 9 was not a chain of icy comet shards at all, but pieces of an unfamiliar species of asteroid.
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NEWS
July 19, 1997
Eugene Shoemaker, 69, an astronomer who co-discovered the comet that slammed into Jupiter in 1994, was killed in a car accident yesterday in Australia during an annual trip to search for asteroid craters. Mr. Shoemaker died in a two-car accident near Alice Springs. His wife, Carolyn, another Lowell Observatory astronomer who shared in the Jupiter comet's discovery, was injured. Mr. Shoemaker was perhaps best known for helping to discover comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which broke up and spectacularly slammed into the giant, gaseous planet in 1994.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 19, 1994
Don't worry about Shoemaker-Levy 9. It would only hit a Jupiter-sized target, wouldn't it?Should the U.S. invade (A) Bosnia, (B) Rwanda, (C) North Korea or (D) Haiti? Choose one.Hurray! Marylanders dropped a cool billion, almost, on the State Lottery in Fiscal '94.Celebrate the great victory. Have a Brazilian take you to lunch.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1995
Ten months after a shattered comet called P/ Shoemaker-Levy 9 plowed into the planet Jupiter, scientists say they have begun to get a clearer picture of the event from the vast and varied array of data they collected in July."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
Just when you think you know a comet, it throws you a curve ball called fragment M.Yesterday, astronomers at W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii reported that they had seen signs of an impact on Jupiter that seemed to be that of the comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9's missing fragment M, which was thought to have evaporated last year.The report, if confirmed, suggests that -- far from evaporating -- M was still a hunk of matter perhaps as long as five football fields when it shot into the planet Wednesday morning.
NEWS
July 13, 1994
From the frigid depths of the Oort Cloud that girdles planets a million million miles from the Sun, an icy interloper hurtles toward the inner solar system, gathering speed. Soon it crosses the orbits of Neptune and Pluto and plunges toward Saturn and Jupiter. By now it has sprouted a glowing tail of gases that stream behind it for millions of miles, making it barely visible to telescopes here.At this point, astronomers would normally report the appearance of a new comet. It might have been so several years ago, when a celestial visitor named Shoemaker-Levy 9 was sighted athwart the orbit of Jupiter.
NEWS
By Von R. Eshleman | July 15, 1994
Palo Alto, Calif. -- TOMORROW, fragments of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are expected to begin smashing into Jupiter at about 130,000 miles an hour.The largest piece is likely to strike with explosive energy exceeding the potential of all the nuclear weapons ever made.It may even be as forceful as the object that hit Earth at the end of the Cretaceous era 65 million years ago and apparently led to the extinction of most living species, including the dinosaurs.Shoemaker-Levy will give scientists an unprecedented opportunity to advance our knowledge about the kinds of cosmic crashes that threaten Earth.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
Fragments of the shattered comet Shoemaker-Levy are breaking up as they rush toward their predicted collision with Jupiter in July, but their discoverer still predicts "lots of fireworks" when they hit.Dr. Eugene Shoemaker said yesterday that the latest photographs of the "string of pearls" comet, taken last month, show that one fragment "has actually winked out and another component has become double."As sharper photos have come in, estimates of the sizes of the 10 largest fragments have been scaled down from a range of a maximum of 2.7 miles in diameter to as little as 0.6 of a mile.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | January 11, 1994
COLLEGE PARK -- The newly discovered comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 will unleash an explosive power that will dwarf the biggest nuclear war humans could ever ignite on Earth when it collides this summer with the planet Jupiter, scientists say.The resulting fireballs and flashes will occur 480 million miles from Earth -- too far away to see without a telescope. But scientists gathered this week at College Park to organize observations that will involve nearly every big observatory in the world, the Hubble Space Telescope and other orbiting observatories.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
When mountain-size pieces of the shattered comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 begin plunging into Jupiter today, they'll fall into the "back" side of the gaseous planet, just beyond the direct view of Earth's telescopes.That's why professional astronomers have been mostly gloomy about the chances for back-yard astronomers to see anything of the flashes and fireballs they have predicted during the seven-day barrage.But Dr. Peter J. T. Leonard, 34, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Maryland College Park, believes there is hope for amateurs.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
GREENBELT -- Astronomers said yesterday that they have detected, for the first time, the rocky debris of one of the comet fragments that smacked into Jupiter last week.Melissa McGrath, an astronomer with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, said the Hubble Space Telescope found magnesium, silicon and perhaps iron in the rust-colored plume kicked up after fragment "G" slammed into Jupiter's atmosphere early Monday morning.She said there are still no signs of water, deepening suspicion that Shoemaker-Levy 9 was not a chain of icy comet shards at all, but pieces of an unfamiliar species of asteroid.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
Just when you think you know a comet, it throws you a curve ball called fragment M.Yesterday, astronomers at W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii reported that they had seen signs of an impact on Jupiter that seemed to be that of the comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9's missing fragment M, which was thought to have evaporated last year.The report, if confirmed, suggests that -- far from evaporating -- M was still a hunk of matter perhaps as long as five football fields when it shot into the planet Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
Astronomers around the world were waiting for the third "shoe" to drop today as the last of a trio of comet fragments headed for splashdown in the same area of Jupiter.Reports reaching the Goddard Space Flight Center this morning said that the first -- fragment Q2 of comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 -- struck on schedule about 3:45 p.m. yesterday.Fragment Q2 was accompanied by a fragile companion, Q1, which fell nearby, making a barely discernible mark on the Jovian cloud tops. Scientists today dubbed it a "Q-let."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
The bombardment of Jupiter by the comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 is revealing chemicals that scientists say might explain for the first time the yellows, reds and browns of Jupiter's visible clouds.Delighted astronomers also reported yesterday that they have seen the equivalent of northern lights on Jupiter, but at latitudes farther south than they have ever been seen before. It's an effect they think is caused by the falling comet.But none of their discoveries or computer enhancements, they say, can match the thrill of putting their eye to a small telescope and seeing the dark impact sites for themselves.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 19, 1994
Don't worry about Shoemaker-Levy 9. It would only hit a Jupiter-sized target, wouldn't it?Should the U.S. invade (A) Bosnia, (B) Rwanda, (C) North Korea or (D) Haiti? Choose one.Hurray! Marylanders dropped a cool billion, almost, on the State Lottery in Fiscal '94.Celebrate the great victory. Have a Brazilian take you to lunch.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
When mountain-size pieces of the shattered comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 begin plunging into Jupiter today, they'll fall into the "back" side of the gaseous planet, just beyond the direct view of Earth's telescopes.That's why professional astronomers have been mostly gloomy about the chances for back-yard astronomers to see anything of the flashes and fireballs they have predicted during the seven-day barrage.But Dr. Peter J. T. Leonard, 34, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of Maryland College Park, believes there is hope for amateurs.
NEWS
July 19, 1997
Eugene Shoemaker, 69, an astronomer who co-discovered the comet that slammed into Jupiter in 1994, was killed in a car accident yesterday in Australia during an annual trip to search for asteroid craters. Mr. Shoemaker died in a two-car accident near Alice Springs. His wife, Carolyn, another Lowell Observatory astronomer who shared in the Jupiter comet's discovery, was injured. Mr. Shoemaker was perhaps best known for helping to discover comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which broke up and spectacularly slammed into the giant, gaseous planet in 1994.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1995
Ten months after a shattered comet called P/ Shoemaker-Levy 9 plowed into the planet Jupiter, scientists say they have begun to get a clearer picture of the event from the vast and varied array of data they collected in July."
NEWS
By Von R. Eshleman | July 15, 1994
Palo Alto, Calif. -- TOMORROW, fragments of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are expected to begin smashing into Jupiter at about 130,000 miles an hour.The largest piece is likely to strike with explosive energy exceeding the potential of all the nuclear weapons ever made.It may even be as forceful as the object that hit Earth at the end of the Cretaceous era 65 million years ago and apparently led to the extinction of most living species, including the dinosaurs.Shoemaker-Levy will give scientists an unprecedented opportunity to advance our knowledge about the kinds of cosmic crashes that threaten Earth.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
Faster than a speeding bullet and more powerful than an arsenal of hydrogen bombs, fragments of Comet P/Shoemaker-Levy 9 are streaking toward a series of titanic collisions with the planet Jupiter beginning this weekend.Astronomers have never seen anything like it before, and from Baltimore to Beijing and the South Pole, they are gearing up to record the seven-day barrage, which will occur more than a half-billion miles away.The 2-million-mile-long squadron of 21 fragments, each composed of loosely packed ice and rock up to 2 miles wide, is rushing toward Jupiter's southern hemisphere at nearly 40 miles per second.
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