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By Harlan Ullman | April 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration initially expected that Iraq's political and military leadership might quickly collapse when, with some fanfare, the Pentagon unveiled the strategy of "shock and awe" to expedite the rapid disintegration of Saddam Hussein's regime. In his briefings to President Bush's war Cabinet, Gen. Tommy Franks, commander of coalition forces in the war, said shock and awe would combine to offset the numerical superiority of Iraqi forces and stun their leadership into submission.
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NEWS
August 19, 2009
Del. Jon S. Cardin found the woman of his dreams, and suddenly those three little words were on his lips: police-involved proposal. The Baltimore County Democrat and girlfriend Megan Homer were aboard a friend's boat in the Inner Harbor on Aug. 7 when on-duty city marine officers boarded the vessel. Pretending to search for contraband as a city police helicopter whirred overhead, the officers reportedly told Homer to turn around so they could handcuff her. When she did, there was Cardin down on one knee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and By Molly Knight,Sun Staff | May 4, 2003
It would be downright un-American if any phrase or image that freshly explodes into public awareness were not swiftly snared for profit. A shocking failure of entrepreneurial DNA! An awesome neglect of exploitative opportunity! The phrase "shock and awe" was coined -- but not trademarked -- by military strategist Harlan Ullman in a 1996 publication. He used it to describe a tactic of pressuring the enemy to give up without much of a fight. But the phrase leaped into universal recognition soon after the first heavy aerial bombardment of Iraq began on March 21. So it's only natural that, by last week, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office had received 26 applications for the use of "shock and awe" for everything from hot sauces to bath toys.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | May 17, 2005
SOMEBODY MUST have slipped an old script into Condoleezza Rice's hands while she was so busy getting packed into body armor for her surprise visit to Iraq on Sunday. Some of the first words out of her mouth to U.S. troops there were: "This war came to us, not the other way around." Huh? The Iraq war did not come to us. We brought the war to Iraq. Remember "shock and awe," the war cry of President Bush, Dick Cheney, Donald H. Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowitz (now a banker, thank God)? Ms. Rice was part of the shock-and-awe team back in those halcyon days when they all were lying to America about why we had to go to war against Iraq and just about everybody believed them.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 28, 2003
NEW YORK - Along with death and destruction, every war brings us new euphemisms to make death sound less deadly. The purpose of this doublespeak is to dumb us down and numb us down, making the other side's deeds sound more ugly and evil, while our side's actions are made to seem more pristine. The first Persian Gulf war popularized the term "collateral damage," a banal euphemism for the unintended killing of innocent bystanders. Many of us later were appalled, although we should not have been all that surprised, when gulf war vet Timothy McVeigh used the term to describe the children who died at a day care center in the federal office building he blew up in Oklahoma City.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 21, 2003
Reporters wearing gas masks. The night sky over Baghdad eerily lit by anti-aircraft fire. Anchormen flanked by retired generals. Three-D computer graphics aimed at putting viewers in the seat of American war planes. This is war as television spectacle, and by 11 a.m. yesterday it overtook all programming on the major networks and the all-news cable channels -- until prime time, anyway. Yet, despite a tidal wave of striking images and new information delivered with great urgency, what television news mainly delivered during the first day of warfare was confusion.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | May 17, 2005
SOMEBODY MUST have slipped an old script into Condoleezza Rice's hands while she was so busy getting packed into body armor for her surprise visit to Iraq on Sunday. Some of the first words out of her mouth to U.S. troops there were: "This war came to us, not the other way around." Huh? The Iraq war did not come to us. We brought the war to Iraq. Remember "shock and awe," the war cry of President Bush, Dick Cheney, Donald H. Rumsfeld, Paul Wolfowitz (now a banker, thank God)? Ms. Rice was part of the shock-and-awe team back in those halcyon days when they all were lying to America about why we had to go to war against Iraq and just about everybody believed them.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nobody ever said, and for good reason, that "war is heck." It's a brutal, deadly resort to force, no matter how justified it may be deemed. Even as the Pentagon low-balls casualties, both U.S. military and Iraqi civilian, television and the press are confirming that the much-heralded "shock and awe" strategy of overwhelming firepower to oust Saddam Hussein has come at a costly human price. The Bush administration, after floating the notion that Iraqi soldiers and civilians might well greet American troops with open arms, and encouraging them to do so with an aerial bombardment of "surrender" leaflets, is now singing a more sober song.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Twenty-five years ago - when the face of evil in the Mideast was not that of Saddam Hussein, but of the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini - most would have figured Iran as the country targeted for an invasion by the United States, not Iraq. It may still be a more plausible target. Last week's commission report on the Sept. 11 attacks documents ties between Iran and al-Qaida and specifically with the Sept. 11 hijackers. On top of that, the country has a controversial and very real nuclear program - much better documented than Hussein's - that has drawn international condemnation.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - The war was supposed to start with about 3,000 precision-guided weapons ripping through the night sky over Baghdad and other Iraqi cities. But late yesterday, President Bush was offered targets he couldn't refuse, and everything changed - at least for the moment. Instead of the widely anticipated massive aerial bombardment, one designed to induce in Iraqi troops and leaders what Pentagon officials have called "shock and awe," the first shots of the second Persian Gulf war were far less destructive and visually impressive.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Twenty-five years ago - when the face of evil in the Mideast was not that of Saddam Hussein, but of the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini - most would have figured Iran as the country targeted for an invasion by the United States, not Iraq. It may still be a more plausible target. Last week's commission report on the Sept. 11 attacks documents ties between Iran and al-Qaida and specifically with the Sept. 11 hijackers. On top of that, the country has a controversial and very real nuclear program - much better documented than Hussein's - that has drawn international condemnation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and By Molly Knight,Sun Staff | May 4, 2003
It would be downright un-American if any phrase or image that freshly explodes into public awareness were not swiftly snared for profit. A shocking failure of entrepreneurial DNA! An awesome neglect of exploitative opportunity! The phrase "shock and awe" was coined -- but not trademarked -- by military strategist Harlan Ullman in a 1996 publication. He used it to describe a tactic of pressuring the enemy to give up without much of a fight. But the phrase leaped into universal recognition soon after the first heavy aerial bombardment of Iraq began on March 21. So it's only natural that, by last week, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office had received 26 applications for the use of "shock and awe" for everything from hot sauces to bath toys.
NEWS
By Harlan Ullman | April 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration initially expected that Iraq's political and military leadership might quickly collapse when, with some fanfare, the Pentagon unveiled the strategy of "shock and awe" to expedite the rapid disintegration of Saddam Hussein's regime. In his briefings to President Bush's war Cabinet, Gen. Tommy Franks, commander of coalition forces in the war, said shock and awe would combine to offset the numerical superiority of Iraqi forces and stun their leadership into submission.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nobody ever said, and for good reason, that "war is heck." It's a brutal, deadly resort to force, no matter how justified it may be deemed. Even as the Pentagon low-balls casualties, both U.S. military and Iraqi civilian, television and the press are confirming that the much-heralded "shock and awe" strategy of overwhelming firepower to oust Saddam Hussein has come at a costly human price. The Bush administration, after floating the notion that Iraqi soldiers and civilians might well greet American troops with open arms, and encouraging them to do so with an aerial bombardment of "surrender" leaflets, is now singing a more sober song.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | March 28, 2003
NEW YORK - Along with death and destruction, every war brings us new euphemisms to make death sound less deadly. The purpose of this doublespeak is to dumb us down and numb us down, making the other side's deeds sound more ugly and evil, while our side's actions are made to seem more pristine. The first Persian Gulf war popularized the term "collateral damage," a banal euphemism for the unintended killing of innocent bystanders. Many of us later were appalled, although we should not have been all that surprised, when gulf war vet Timothy McVeigh used the term to describe the children who died at a day care center in the federal office building he blew up in Oklahoma City.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 21, 2003
Reporters wearing gas masks. The night sky over Baghdad eerily lit by anti-aircraft fire. Anchormen flanked by retired generals. Three-D computer graphics aimed at putting viewers in the seat of American war planes. This is war as television spectacle, and by 11 a.m. yesterday it overtook all programming on the major networks and the all-news cable channels -- until prime time, anyway. Yet, despite a tidal wave of striking images and new information delivered with great urgency, what television news mainly delivered during the first day of warfare was confusion.
NEWS
August 19, 2009
Del. Jon S. Cardin found the woman of his dreams, and suddenly those three little words were on his lips: police-involved proposal. The Baltimore County Democrat and girlfriend Megan Homer were aboard a friend's boat in the Inner Harbor on Aug. 7 when on-duty city marine officers boarded the vessel. Pretending to search for contraband as a city police helicopter whirred overhead, the officers reportedly told Homer to turn around so they could handcuff her. When she did, there was Cardin down on one knee.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | December 14, 2003
What the United States called a campaign of shock and awe against Saddam Hussein's Iraq is being criticized by Human Rights Watch as an invasion that used two "misguided" military tactics, resulting in hundreds of civilian deaths. The report by HRW, a human rights group based in New York, criticized the United States and Britain for using cluster weapons in populated areas and for 50 bombing strikes that were intended to kill Iraq's leadership but instead killed civilians. Cluster bombs killed or injured more than 1,000 civilians, according to HRW estimates.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - The war was supposed to start with about 3,000 precision-guided weapons ripping through the night sky over Baghdad and other Iraqi cities. But late yesterday, President Bush was offered targets he couldn't refuse, and everything changed - at least for the moment. Instead of the widely anticipated massive aerial bombardment, one designed to induce in Iraqi troops and leaders what Pentagon officials have called "shock and awe," the first shots of the second Persian Gulf war were far less destructive and visually impressive.
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