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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When H. Mebane Turner joined the old-line Maryland Club in 1961, its ranks included only white men. African-Americans and Jews were not among those invited to be members. Times have changed at the Eager Street establishment. In the ensuing years, members found it "appropriate" to welcome minorities into the fold of the businessmen's club, said Turner, the retired president of the University of Baltimore. "They still don't take ladies, I'm afraid, except as guests," he said. In Maryland, private clubs with exclusive memberships still exist, although their influence might be waning.
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NEWS
September 20, 2007
LLOYD DAVIS, 79 Aided King's widow Lloyd Davis, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow to build Atlanta's King Center and establish the holiday honoring the civil rights leader, died of cancer Monday in Chevy Chase. A longtime federal housing official, he came to the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change about 1980 as executive vice president and chief operating officer, working alongside Coretta Scott King to maintain her husband's legacy. Later, he was executive director of the federal King Holiday Commission.
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SPORTS
December 30, 1990
Shoal Creek's founder quits as board chairmanHall W. Thompson, who touched off a national controversy when he said the all-white golf club he founded in Birmingham, Ala., would not be pressured into accepting black members, has resigned as chairman of Shoal Creek's board of directors.The resignation occurred Wednesday night at a board meeting, said Tom Rast, who was elected board president at the meeting. Rast said Thompson will remain as chairman of the board's golf committee, which controls the golf course and grounds.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When H. Mebane Turner joined the old-line Maryland Club in 1961, its ranks included only white men. African-Americans and Jews were not among those invited to be members. Times have changed at the Eager Street establishment. In the ensuing years, members found it "appropriate" to welcome minorities into the fold of the businessmen's club, said Turner, the retired president of the University of Baltimore. "They still don't take ladies, I'm afraid, except as guests," he said. In Maryland, private clubs with exclusive memberships still exist, although their influence might be waning.
NEWS
September 20, 2007
LLOYD DAVIS, 79 Aided King's widow Lloyd Davis, who worked with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow to build Atlanta's King Center and establish the holiday honoring the civil rights leader, died of cancer Monday in Chevy Chase. A longtime federal housing official, he came to the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change about 1980 as executive vice president and chief operating officer, working alongside Coretta Scott King to maintain her husband's legacy. Later, he was executive director of the federal King Holiday Commission.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 26, 1991
The story was so incredible, the circumstances so egregious, the victim so innocent, the guilty parties so damned guilty that, even in Caldwell Parish, La., where David Duke is a popular politician, they knew this was unacceptable behavior.The headline stripped across the top of Page 1 of the Monroe News-Star read: "Club Policy Bars Black Student From Golf Match."No one could quite believe it."I was surprised," said Sister Marlene Geppert, principal of St. Frederick's High of Monroe, where the student attends, "but not shocked.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1990
NEW YORK -- Augusta National Golf Club, the prestigious home of the Masters and one of the most exclusive clubs in America, has accepted its first black member, according to a person close to the club.That person, who refused to let his name be used, would not identify the new member other than to say he was nearly 50 years old and belonged to another private golf club, where he was also the first black to become a member.The offer of membership was made and accepted Friday, but it is a regular policy of the club not to make the names of its members public, the individual with knowledge of the offer said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
The images from Shoal Creek had faded from memory:The pickets and protests outside the Birmingham, Ala., golf club whose president, Hall Thompson, fiercely defended its right to a private, all-white membership.The insensitive remarks from prominent members of the PGA Tour inside the press tent during the 1990 PGA Championship.But those memories were stirred recently when one of the most celebrated and respected players in the game's history was asked why blacks had not made more of an impact at the highest levels of the sport.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | December 30, 1990
Upset of the centuryHe came from Palookaville, boxing's colony of lost souls and shattered dreamers. But, in Tokyo, this 45-1 underdog was transformed into a real-life Rocky. James "Buster" Douglas knocked out Mike Tyson in the 10th round and became the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world Feb. 11. But this story of redemption ended in failure. In his first title defense, for which he was paid $19.9 million, a bloated, wobbly Douglas was shelled in three rounds by Evander Holyfield on Oct. 25 in Las Vegas.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 14, 1990
SPORTS, on exceptional occasions, transcends fun and games. What happens in the stadium or the arena isn't all that important. To awaken the social conscience of a nation is more meaningful, which is what happened last summer at Shoal Creek in Birmingham, Ala., and now at the Fiesta Bowl in Phoenix.Blacks and other minorities have been abused too long. Athletics and show business have opened doors of opportunity, granting an equality to the performers but only tacit acceptance in too many instances for the masses.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
The images from Shoal Creek had faded from memory:The pickets and protests outside the Birmingham, Ala., golf club whose president, Hall Thompson, fiercely defended its right to a private, all-white membership.The insensitive remarks from prominent members of the PGA Tour inside the press tent during the 1990 PGA Championship.But those memories were stirred recently when one of the most celebrated and respected players in the game's history was asked why blacks had not made more of an impact at the highest levels of the sport.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 26, 1991
The story was so incredible, the circumstances so egregious, the victim so innocent, the guilty parties so damned guilty that, even in Caldwell Parish, La., where David Duke is a popular politician, they knew this was unacceptable behavior.The headline stripped across the top of Page 1 of the Monroe News-Star read: "Club Policy Bars Black Student From Golf Match."No one could quite believe it."I was surprised," said Sister Marlene Geppert, principal of St. Frederick's High of Monroe, where the student attends, "but not shocked.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | January 4, 1991
DAN QUAYLE played 18 holes before someone tapped him on the shoulder and pointed out that there were protesters outside the Cyprus Point Golf Course. The vice president was shocked. Protest? Trouble? Whatever could be the matter?The matter was a simple one, and until last week I suspected the only people who didn't know about it were those who were vacationing in LindaCottonSamoa last summer. That's when civil rights groups protested holding the PGA championship at Shoal Creek Country Club, an all-white club in Birmingham, Ala., which barred blacks as either members or guests.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | December 30, 1990
Upset of the centuryHe came from Palookaville, boxing's colony of lost souls and shattered dreamers. But, in Tokyo, this 45-1 underdog was transformed into a real-life Rocky. James "Buster" Douglas knocked out Mike Tyson in the 10th round and became the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world Feb. 11. But this story of redemption ended in failure. In his first title defense, for which he was paid $19.9 million, a bloated, wobbly Douglas was shelled in three rounds by Evander Holyfield on Oct. 25 in Las Vegas.
SPORTS
December 30, 1990
Shoal Creek's founder quits as board chairmanHall W. Thompson, who touched off a national controversy when he said the all-white golf club he founded in Birmingham, Ala., would not be pressured into accepting black members, has resigned as chairman of Shoal Creek's board of directors.The resignation occurred Wednesday night at a board meeting, said Tom Rast, who was elected board president at the meeting. Rast said Thompson will remain as chairman of the board's golf committee, which controls the golf course and grounds.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 14, 1990
SPORTS, on exceptional occasions, transcends fun and games. What happens in the stadium or the arena isn't all that important. To awaken the social conscience of a nation is more meaningful, which is what happened last summer at Shoal Creek in Birmingham, Ala., and now at the Fiesta Bowl in Phoenix.Blacks and other minorities have been abused too long. Athletics and show business have opened doors of opportunity, granting an equality to the performers but only tacit acceptance in too many instances for the masses.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | January 4, 1991
DAN QUAYLE played 18 holes before someone tapped him on the shoulder and pointed out that there were protesters outside the Cyprus Point Golf Course. The vice president was shocked. Protest? Trouble? Whatever could be the matter?The matter was a simple one, and until last week I suspected the only people who didn't know about it were those who were vacationing in LindaCottonSamoa last summer. That's when civil rights groups protested holding the PGA championship at Shoal Creek Country Club, an all-white club in Birmingham, Ala., which barred blacks as either members or guests.
NEWS
May 31, 2002
Onie Jane Berger, a homemaker and former longtime Parkville resident, died of cancer Wednesday at Mariner Healthcare in Bel Air. She was 82. Born Onie Jane Jarrard in Shoal Creek, Ga., she moved with her family to East Baltimore in 1922 and attended city public schools. She was a production worker for McCormick & Co. and Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Esskay meatpackers, during the 1940s. In 1938, she married Paul Francis Berger. A retired printer for The Sun, he died in 1996. Mrs. Berger was an avid Orioles fan, and enjoyed watching soap operas and preparing holiday dinners for her family.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1990
NEW YORK -- Augusta National Golf Club, the prestigious home of the Masters and one of the most exclusive clubs in America, has accepted its first black member, according to a person close to the club.That person, who refused to let his name be used, would not identify the new member other than to say he was nearly 50 years old and belonged to another private golf club, where he was also the first black to become a member.The offer of membership was made and accepted Friday, but it is a regular policy of the club not to make the names of its members public, the individual with knowledge of the offer said.
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