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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
When he knew all cameras and lights would be trained on him, Ray Lewis pulled his game jersey off Sunday to reveal a shirt with a single message: Psalms 91. So curious minds wanted to understand what point Lewis was trying to make as he took a victory lap around the stadium wearing this particular shirt. The psalm is known as the "psalm of protection. " It has a lot to do with vanquishing various enemies with faith and treading upon beasts under one's feet. Here's a key passage: Surely he will save you from the fowler's snare and from the deadly pestilence.
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NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Doberman sits on the edge of a bed, oblivious of the remarkable view from the floor-to-ceiling window. Modern high-rises peep out from a dense forest dotted with palm trees and shrouded in mist. Artist Jereme Scott says his painting was inspired by a 1957 photograph in National Geographic. At 66 inches by 50 inches, “The Watcher of Suite Singapore” is the largest item on display at his store, Cotton Duck Art & Apparel, in Historic Ellicott City. The shop, which opened in March, also sells T-shirts, hoodies and tank tops Scott designed, and jewelry made by designers from the Mid-Atlantic.  Scott, 28, studied fine arts at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia and received his master's in studio arts from Howard University.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Ray Rice continues to stand up against bullying by designing a T-shirt that will help raise money to fight the problem. Rice has joined with PACER National Bullying Prevention Center and a shirt company called CustomInk for the Be Good to Each Other campaign, designing a tee with the message: "You can be a hero to someone just by being a friend -- Ray Rice. " Adult versions of the shirt cost $26 and all of the proceeds will go to PACER, an organization that aims to prevent bullying through education.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Darren O'Day is set apart from other relievers by his sidearm delivery, his own version of the “Ole” song, and his 0.92 ERA, among other things. And he can add another to the list. “I have a couple things going for me, and now I have a T-shirt,” O'Day said Wednesday, when the Orioles gave out orange T-shirts with his “O'Day” song and a silhouette logo of his sidearm delivery. “It's pretty exciting. I never expected a T-shirt.” O'Day pitched a scoreless ninth inning in the Orioles' 3-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays, his 10th scoreless outing in a row. He has allowed one run in 14 appearances since the All-Star break, and he has struck out more than one batter per inning this season.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Can someone loan Ken Ulman a shirt he can wear to pick up another county's garbage? Don't everyone line up at once. After his bet on Sunday's Ravens game went sour, the Howard County executive has to make good on what he promised Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker. Sometime this week Ulman must put on a Robert Lee Griffin III jersey and wear it to pick up roadside trash in  Redskins terriotory while singing the team song. "All my Redskin fan friends are coming out of the woodwork today, giving me a hard time.," Ulman said in a video he posted Monday on You Tube.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
A 12-year-old Bel Air boy was reprimanded Wednesday by administrators at his middle school for wearing a football-themed sweat shirt with the words "Ball So Hard University" printed across the chest. "I was kind of disappointed," said Ayden Lasley, who is in the seventh grade at Bel Air's Southampton Middle School and was bewildered by the administrators' assessment that the shirt was inappropriate for school. He was told he had to remove the shirt or turn it inside out. "I thought, 'Do you see the purple football?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2012
James Francis "Shirt-sleeves" O'Neill, a retired lawyer who had served as mayor of Bel Air in the early 1970s, died of cancer Monday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 86. "Jim was a character, spontaneous, funny and off the wall sometimes but not all the time," said Todd Holden, a former Aegis reporter and photographer who was a longtime friend. "He used to ride a minibike when gas went through the roof, and always had a Red Baron white scarf around his neck as he made his way around town," said Mr. Holden.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | August 18, 1991
Washington.--Not long ago at a certain barbecue restaurant in southside Virginia, where most of the customers are church-going senior citizens, a young man and his female friend entered wearing T-shirts.The message on his shirt was in four big red letters, plus an exclamation point. To most religious old folks, and especially to those already eating, it was not an appetizing word. To say it or flaunt it in public is bad manners among the dwindling band of citizens who still have manners.I said to my fellow witness, an octogenarian, that if I were themanager, I would have told the T-shirt wearer to take his business elsewhere.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1995
At Lansdowne High School, T-shirts aren't just something to wear. They're academic credit -- and a thriving business.The 30 students enrolled in teacher Robert Hooey's "Teen Enterprises" course spend their class time learning how to run graphic arts mini-factories, and the subject matter ranges from silk screening to pleasing customers."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Ouch! Darn it! Missed one!One of life's verities is that whenever a man opens a new shirt, he finds a thousand straight pins -- or at least eight or 10.They are simply a fact of sartorial life, taken for granted except when a forgotten pin delivers a pointed reminder of its presence.Then it's "Why are all those*! pins in new shirts and how do they get there?"The pins are there because, industry sources say, no better way has been found to keep new shirts folded crisply and neatly, and they get there by the grace of people like Michelle Anderson, Agnes Green and Tina Bhatt, who emplace them -- by hand -- eight to 10 per shirt, depending on fabric and style.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
A 9-year-old boy was badly burned over half of his body in Garrett County on the Fourth of July after a sparkler set fire to his shirt. The boy, whose name was not immediately released, was in critical condition in Western Pennsylvania Hospital in Pittsburgh with burns over 50 percent of his body on his chest, neck and arms. State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci said in a news release that the boy was injured at about 10 a.m. Friday while camping at Savage State Forest in Swanton.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Nelson Cruz, who has wasted little time hitting his way into Orioles fans' hearts with every belt-high fastball he deposits into the stands, has officially arrived in the minds of the team's promotional staff. The game against the Detroit Tigers on May 13 will be Nelson Cruz T-shirt night. Cruz, who has hit six home runs and driven in 21 runs en route to a .301/.386/.683 line in 19 games this season, has found a home hitting in front of Orioles slugger Chris Davis. He's getting pitches to hit and making opposing pitchers pay. The Cruz T-shirt features 26 'U's on the front.
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Six months after captaining the Stevenson University women's basketball team during her senior season, Sam Murray sat in a doctor's office at Sinai Hospital waiting for her diagnosis. After leading the Mustangs in scoring and being named team MVP as a junior in 2012, Murray had begun experiencing discomfort in her right knee as she prepared for her senior year. At first, she thought there was damage to her meniscus. She played through it, refusing to give up her final year of basketball to injury.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
A Johns Hopkins University student was stabbed several times during a fight at a house party just off campus early Sunday morning, according to police. A campus-wide security alert said the fight broke out in the basement of a house in the 3200 block of N. Charles St. at 1:41 a.m. The suspect left after the stabbing and has not been found by university and city police who searched the area, the alert said. The suspect was described as a 25-year-old white man around 5-foot-10 and 220 pounds with dark hair.
HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Designers have gone pink once again this October in the name of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. We've gathered some of the more fashionable items so you can look stylish while contributing to organizations that aim to increase awareness of the disease and raise funds for research that will help prevent, treat and cure it. All of these finds are just a few clicks away online. Pop a polo This preppy polo is a subtle way of showing your support. A portion of the sale is directed to Polo Ralph Lauren Foundation's Pink Pony fund, which supports programs that help fight cancer and, in particular, reaches out to medically underserved communities.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | October 8, 2013
The Baltimore Ravens' Ray Rice joined a campaign to raise money for anti-bullying efforts, designing a T-shirt that encourages youth to be kind to each other. The purple T-shirt that reads "You can be a hero to someone just by being a friend," is part of CustomInk's bullying prevention efforts, and comes during the official National Bullying Awareness month. The Virginia-based company tapped singers, actors and other athletes to design T-shirts that spread messages against bullying.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The phone lines at Democratic Party headquarters are jammed these days. Not with pledges of huge contributions, but with T-shirt orders.The shirt, mocking President Bush's overseas travels, has become a cult item for Democrats around the country. Copies are being snapped up at rates of up to 1,000 a day, with more than 11,000 sold so far, largely by word of mouth.Of course, all that free advertising hasn't hurt. The news media have given generous coverage to the novelty item, which is a takeoff on the T-shirts worn by rock stars and their fans.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1991
KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait -- A Kuwaiti military tribunal convicted six people yesterday of collaborating with the Iraqi occupation and gave a 15-year jail sentence to one Iraqi whose only known offense was wearing a T-shirt that indicated support for Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.The five-judge panel took less than five hours to convict the six, acquit four others and hear preliminary evidence about 12 more accused collaborators.The trials that began yesterday were the first for more than 600 people detained as suspected collaborators after Kuwait's liberation from Iraqi control in February.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Under Armour won't be the Baltimore Running Festival's title sponsor going forward, but the company made clear on Thursday it will continue to outfit Baltimore runners. The company has signed a multi-year deal with Corrigan Sports Enterprises Inc., which organizes the running festival, to be the official race-themed apparel and footwear provider. That includes the performance shirts that participants in each of the running festival's events -- the marathon, half-marathon, 5K, relay and kids run run -- receive as part of their official race package.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
The Orioles just announced the winner of their fan designed T-shirt contest. The shirt above, designed by Scott Thompson of Rockville, will be given to the first 10,000 fans 15 and over at the Orioles' Sept. 26 home game against the Toronto Blue Jays. The team received more than 500 designs and narrowed them down to three for a final vote. This design obviously pays tribute to the Orioles' ritual of celebrating big wins with shaving-cream pies.
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