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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The news of Shirley Temple's death cast a cloud over an otherwise sunny day here in Baltimore. I do not hesitate to confess that some of my favorite times as a kid -- and, yes, in later years, too -- were spent watching her childhood movies. I didn't care how cornball or contrived the plots. I just loved her smile, her voice, her unpretentious talent. Not to mention the songs and the many vibrant actors who worked with her, helping to make even the silliest of the  movies enjoyable and often quite touching.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The news of Shirley Temple's death cast a cloud over an otherwise sunny day here in Baltimore. I do not hesitate to confess that some of my favorite times as a kid -- and, yes, in later years, too -- were spent watching her childhood movies. I didn't care how cornball or contrived the plots. I just loved her smile, her voice, her unpretentious talent. Not to mention the songs and the many vibrant actors who worked with her, helping to make even the silliest of the  movies enjoyable and often quite touching.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
Shirley Temple may have quit acting too soon. The mos arresting moments of "Shirley Temple: America's Little Darling," a pledge-period special airing on Maryland Public Television tonight, arrive near the end in too-short snippets of her performances as a near-adult.Surprise! In her final films she could actually act.Indeed, viewers may find themselves wondering what movie gems might have followed had she chosen not to leave films in 1949 at the age of but 20. (The PBS show airs at 8 p.m. on MPT on Washington's WETA-Channel 26, with two built-in pledge breaks introduced by host Tommy Tune.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The Depression had Shirley Temple. This recession has … Kim Kardashian? Maybe every downturn gets the distraction it deserves. This has to be filed under the good news/bad news category: New figures are out showing that advertising has picked up at many magazines, among the industries hit hard by the recession, after steep declines in the past couple of years. But it's not all magazines. While newsstand mainstays like Newsweek and Forbes continued to struggle, particularly big jumps in ad pages came in the category of celebrity mags, those breathless trackers of the stars in all their dating, divorcing, drunken-driving glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Thank goodness for little girls -- especially in movies. Not Disney cartoon characters in bikinis, but brave, clever, strong little girls. Such is the character of Sara Crewe in "A Little Princess," the enchanting new adaptation of Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic novel.The movie dares to tread where Shirley Temple once did. And Burnett purists need not attend: The setting and time have been changed slightly from the book. But put all that aside, approach it anew, and you'll find a movie full of wonder and magic.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 1996
EAST COLUMBIA library visitors, young and old, are enjoying Jenny Elmore's paper doll collection, which is on display until the end of this month. The dolls range from Shirley Temple to a German doll set."I have always collected," Ms. Elmore said. "I started collecting postcards when I was 2 years old. After World War II, my grandfather was gathering household items from a Red Cross tent in the Netherlands. He found two sets of paper dolls, which he brought home for me."I have been collecting them ever since.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 19, 2001
You'll know the recession is over when the layoffs stop. Congress did right for airport safety in the end, which raises some hope it may craft a real economic stimulus after all. Harry Potter is (A) a traditional English schoolboy; (B) a wizard who tricks children into reading; or (C) the biggest hype since Shirley Temple. Choose three. Putin is the best thing that's happened to public radio in a long time.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 13, 1999
150 years ago in The SunMarch 13: A Scene of Wretchedness -- The celebrated work by Eugene Sue, entitled the "Mysteries of Paris," has given the world an insight into some of the misery and wretchedness of that gay capital -- how the rich and the poor live, and what crimes are committed by both.100 years ago in The SunMarch 15: An audience which nearly crowded the Music Hall gathered there last night to listen to a programme of which James Whitcomb Riley, "The Hoosier Poet," was the star feature.
NEWS
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2006
When Shirley Temple Black walks onto the stage of the Shrine Exposition Hall in Los Angeles tonight to receive the 42nd Screen Actors Guild lifetime achievement award for her movie career and humanitarian efforts, most of her young fans will probably be shocked to see she's a 77-year-old grandmother. Because of television, video and DVDs, a whole new fan base of children around the world is enjoying her musicals from the 1930s - and they are sending her bushels of fan mail, just as fans did when the films were first released.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1996
Hard to believe, but it's true: The new episodes are back. Check 'em out."3rd Rock From The Sun" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The aliens decide they're actually Italian. And why not? NBC."Wings" (8: 30 p.m-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Antonio (Tony Shalhoub) encounters a beautiful woman on the island -- then spends the rest of the episode trying to find her again."The Hunt For Red October" (8: 30 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Before Harrison Ford took over the role of everybody's favorite CIA official, Alec Baldwin took a crack at it in this adaptation of Tom Clancy's first best-seller.
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2008
You could call Harmony Korine's Mister Lonely a comeback, but that would imply the return was anticipated, or that it heralds a return to form. I'm not sure either description applies. Mister Lonely is just as unconventional, by Hollywood standards, as his earlier films, if markedly less pugnacious. In his latest picture, Korine, who is best known for his screenplay Kids (written in a matter of weeks at the tender age of 22) and the experimental provocations of Gummo and Julien Donkey-Boy, seems to be working through some of the things he went through as wunderkind-turned-washout, taking on the desire to be somebody else and faith in the impossible as themes and manifesting them in his singular, surreal style.
NEWS
By SUSAN KING and SUSAN KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2006
When Shirley Temple Black walks onto the stage of the Shrine Exposition Hall in Los Angeles tonight to receive the 42nd Screen Actors Guild lifetime achievement award for her movie career and humanitarian efforts, most of her young fans will probably be shocked to see she's a 77-year-old grandmother. Because of television, video and DVDs, a whole new fan base of children around the world is enjoying her musicals from the 1930s - and they are sending her bushels of fan mail, just as fans did when the films were first released.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 19, 2001
You'll know the recession is over when the layoffs stop. Congress did right for airport safety in the end, which raises some hope it may craft a real economic stimulus after all. Harry Potter is (A) a traditional English schoolboy; (B) a wizard who tricks children into reading; or (C) the biggest hype since Shirley Temple. Choose three. Putin is the best thing that's happened to public radio in a long time.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 13, 1999
150 years ago in The SunMarch 13: A Scene of Wretchedness -- The celebrated work by Eugene Sue, entitled the "Mysteries of Paris," has given the world an insight into some of the misery and wretchedness of that gay capital -- how the rich and the poor live, and what crimes are committed by both.100 years ago in The SunMarch 15: An audience which nearly crowded the Music Hall gathered there last night to listen to a programme of which James Whitcomb Riley, "The Hoosier Poet," was the star feature.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1998
Alone among awards shows, the annual Kennedy Center Honors invariably salutes people who deserve it.This year's gala, taped Dec. 6 and airing tonight on WJZ, Channel 13 (9 p.m.-11 p.m.), continues the tradition of showcasing the best the American performing arts scene has to honor. And if some of the show's segments are a bit more spirited and memorable than others, at least everyone's heart is in the right place.The show opens with what proves to be its high point, a vibrant salute to the Broadway composer and lyricist team of John Kander and Fred Ebb that spans their entire career, from the star of their first show (Liza Minnelli)
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Irish dancer Katie Fox understands a performer must pay as much attention to her dress as her steps.Fox, a Loch Raven High School sophomore and honors student from Towson, has learned to abide by the judge's criteria, which can be as unforgiving as an Olympic skating judge's. Luckily, in the rest of her life this ardent athlete, actress and fiddle player can throw on a pair of jeans and a T-shirt and feel right at home.Since she was 7, Katie Fox has been a student of the Broesler School of Irish Dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 1, 1994
No matter how cute child stars such as Shirley Temple and the Olsen twins are, a lot of the time you just want to smack them.Something about the ease with which they summon phony emotions makes them seem inhuman -- we sense that many of these dimpled angels are really monsters. They're certainly ripe for being targets of satire, and the movie "Clifford" knows it. But the people who made this bizarre comedy didn't have the guts to follow through.The title character is an unusually smart, unusually rotten kid who is obsessed with visiting California's fictitious Dinosaurworld.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
The Depression had Shirley Temple. This recession has … Kim Kardashian? Maybe every downturn gets the distraction it deserves. This has to be filed under the good news/bad news category: New figures are out showing that advertising has picked up at many magazines, among the industries hit hard by the recession, after steep declines in the past couple of years. But it's not all magazines. While newsstand mainstays like Newsweek and Forbes continued to struggle, particularly big jumps in ad pages came in the category of celebrity mags, those breathless trackers of the stars in all their dating, divorcing, drunken-driving glory.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 26, 1997
Television reruns have introduced new generations to the movies and TV shows of the 1930s, '40s, '50s and '60s. That has created interest in the toys and furnishings from those periods.One movie star who still remains popular with fans of all ages is Shirley Temple. The actress was born in 1928 and was singing and dancing in films by 1932. She was the No. 1 box-office star by 1936 and made her last theatrical movie in 1949.Since then, she has been U.S. ambassador to Ghana and U.S. chief of protocol.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1996
Hard to believe, but it's true: The new episodes are back. Check 'em out."3rd Rock From The Sun" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The aliens decide they're actually Italian. And why not? NBC."Wings" (8: 30 p.m-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Antonio (Tony Shalhoub) encounters a beautiful woman on the island -- then spends the rest of the episode trying to find her again."The Hunt For Red October" (8: 30 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Before Harrison Ford took over the role of everybody's favorite CIA official, Alec Baldwin took a crack at it in this adaptation of Tom Clancy's first best-seller.
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