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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Biopharmaceutical company Shire plans to close its Owings Mills plant in phases over three years and lay off 260 workers as it discontinues in-house manufacturing of drugs to treat attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorders and gastrointestinal diseases, a company spokesman said Thursday. Shire plans to outsource the work at the plant, with medications to be made instead in North Carolina by a contract manufacturer. Shire decided to close the plant as it moves away from in-house manufacturing, said Matt Cabrey, the spokesman.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Stevenson University has bought the Shire Pharmaceuticals plant next door to its Owings Mills campus, a $10.5 million deal that a school official said will expand the grounds by a third and help meet the goal of increasing full-time student enrollment to 4,000 in the next two years. "It was just a great opportunity we couldn't pass up," Tim Campbell, Stevenson's executive vice president for financial affairs and chief financial officer, said of the sale that closed Tuesday, expanding the campus in northwestern Baltimore County from 74 to 102 acres.
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NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
When a pharmaceutical company acquired an Owings Mills drug firm about four years ago, about 100 people worked there. Shire Pharmaceuticals has since expanded and brought another 150 jobs to Baltimore County. Yesterday, the company announced another expansion. Company officials joined by politicians, fireworks and shimmering golden streamers unveiled a multimillion-dollar building designed, in part, to improve manufacturing efficiency. The $6 million Pharmaceutical Technology Center is 19,000 square feet.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Biopharmaceutical company Shire plans to close its Owings Mills plant in phases over three years and lay off 260 workers as it discontinues in-house manufacturing of drugs to treat attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorders and gastrointestinal diseases, a company spokesman said Thursday. Shire plans to outsource the work at the plant, with medications to be made instead in North Carolina by a contract manufacturer. Shire decided to close the plant as it moves away from in-house manufacturing, said Matt Cabrey, the spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1997
A Maryland biotechnology company said yesterday that the Food and Drug Administration has given it tacit approval to market its new drug to treat epilepsy in the United States, one of the first new drugs to be approved for the disease in 15 years.Final regulatory approval for the drug known as Carbatrol rests on Rockville-based Shire Laboratories Inc.'s meeting certain manufacturing requirements for the drug.Krystyna Belendiuk, senior vice president for business development at Shire Laboratories -- known as Pharmavene, Inc. until it was bought recently by Shire Pharmaceuticals of Andover, England -- said the company "fully expects to meet the FDA's requests."
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
Shire Pharmaceuticals Group will spend $22 million for renovations and additions at its Owings Mills manufacturing plant and will employ 50 more workers next year, the company has announced. Shire will break ground for a $6 million technology center on Gundry Lane in the Rosewood State Center on Thursday morning. The 19,000-square-foot addition to the plant will develop chemicals for Shire's drug products. The plant also will be expanded with a $16 million, 40,000-square-foot facility to allow the company to package and store its products on site, Shire officials said.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1997
Shire Pharmaceuticals Group PLC, a British pharmaceutical firm, said yesterday that it has completed the purchase of Pharmavene Inc., a Rockville-based biotechnology company.Under the agreement, announced last month, Shire initially will pay $25 million in cash and about $65 million in Shire stock for privately held Pharmavene.The purchase price could reach $160 million if certain contingencies are met, including final Food and Drug Administration approval for Carbatrol, an epilepsy drug developed by Pharmavene.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
In one of the largest deals for a Maryland biotechnology company, a British pharmaceutical firm yesterday announced it will pay as much as $160 million for Rockville's Pharmavene Inc., which has never turned a profit.The deal with Shire Pharmaceuticals Group PLC indicates how potentially lucrative is Pharmavene's "drug delivery technology," which manipulates a drug's molecules to better target diseases.If the merger is approved by shareholders of both companies, Shire initially will pay $25 million in cash and about $65 million in Shire stock for privately held Pharmavene.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
Yo Yo is a no-show.The 10-month-old trumpeter swan, one of three taught to migrate to Maryland's Eastern Shore in December behind an ultralight airplane, has been missing from her Dorchester County wintering grounds for two weeks."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 5, 1997
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Composer David Shire jokes that the musical "Big" should be retitled "Not So Big."He means that as a compliment."Normally when a big show goes on the road, it has to be scaled down a little bit. In this case, going from a $10 million production to a $2 million production was a necessity that was a virtue," Shire explains before a recent technical rehearsal.Just about everyone associated with the show agrees that "Big, the Musical" was too big on Broadway.The road show, however, which opens a one-week run Tuesday at the Mechanic Theatre, the second stop on a 35-city tour, has done a lot more than shrink one of the costliest failures in Broadway history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
There's probably little Britney Spears can do to reverse the damage done to her image. The glorious, teasingly sexy bubble in which she floated a decade ago has long since burst. Her madhouse life, as covered by the ravenous pop press, has all but obliterated Spears' relevance as a recording star. Last year was especially rough for the former teen-pop phenom. Not long after her fumbling lip-sync performance of "Gimme More" on the MTV Video Music Awards, she was institutionalized and lost custody of her baby boys.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
When a pharmaceutical company acquired an Owings Mills drug firm about four years ago, about 100 people worked there. Shire Pharmaceuticals has since expanded and brought another 150 jobs to Baltimore County. Yesterday, the company announced another expansion. Company officials joined by politicians, fireworks and shimmering golden streamers unveiled a multimillion-dollar building designed, in part, to improve manufacturing efficiency. The $6 million Pharmaceutical Technology Center is 19,000 square feet.
NEWS
December 21, 2005
On December 19, 2005, DAVID WAYNE beloved husband of Diane Judith Shires (nee Bollinger) father of Ronald Barker, Joseph and Jennifer Shires, son of Jean Nagnaye, stepson of Rudy Nagnaye, brother of Donna, Dee, Krisy, Divinia and R.J. Services at ECKHARDT FUNERAL CHAPEL, P.A., 11605 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills, Thursday at 10 A.M. Interment New Cathedral Cemetery. Friends may call Wednesday 3 to 5 and7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
Shire Pharmaceuticals Group will spend $22 million for renovations and additions at its Owings Mills manufacturing plant and will employ 50 more workers next year, the company has announced. Shire will break ground for a $6 million technology center on Gundry Lane in the Rosewood State Center on Thursday morning. The 19,000-square-foot addition to the plant will develop chemicals for Shire's drug products. The plant also will be expanded with a $16 million, 40,000-square-foot facility to allow the company to package and store its products on site, Shire officials said.
NEWS
October 17, 2004
On October 10, 2004, SHIRLEY M. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 East North Avenue, on Monday after 8:30 A.M., where the family will receive friends at Mt. Sinai Baptist Church, 922 Preston St., on Tuesday at 11 A.M. Services will follow at 11:30 A.M. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
A few days before Christmas, at about 3 in the morning, a neighbor pounded on a Maryland City couple's bedroom window. Panicked, Carol and Bernie Buczynski threw on their robes and slippers and stepped out into the cold night air, where they saw their 1993 Ford Taurus station wagon lit up like a torch. The fire was so hot that it melted the vinyl siding on part of their single-story house on Horsehead, where they had lived without incident for more than 30 years. "I just sort of stood there, numb," said Carol Buczynski.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1997
LAKES COVE -- Despite a midair collision that nearly turned triumph to tragedy, three trumpeter swans landed beneath a pale winter sun yesterday in Dorchester County, becoming the first of their species to migrate to the Chesapeake Bay in 180 years.The birds ended their two-day, 103-mile journey as they began it -- in the wake of an ultralight airplane piloted by Canadian biologist Gavin Shire, whom the birds regard as their mother."Flying over the bay was great," Shire said after all three birds had safely followed him onto the grassy field between the Honga River and Charles Creek.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
A few days before Christmas, at about 3 in the morning, a neighbor pounded on a Maryland City couple's bedroom window. Panicked, Carol and Bernie Buczynski threw on their robes and slippers and stepped out into the cold night air, where they saw their 1993 Ford Taurus station wagon lit up like a torch. The fire was so hot that it melted the vinyl siding on part of their single-story house on Horsehead, where they had lived without incident for more than 30 years. "I just sort of stood there, numb," said Carol Buczynski.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1998
Yo Yo is a no-show.The 10-month-old trumpeter swan, one of three taught to migrate to Maryland's Eastern Shore in December behind an ultralight airplane, has been missing from her Dorchester County wintering grounds for two weeks."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1997
LAKES COVE -- Despite a midair collision that nearly turned triumph to tragedy, three trumpeter swans landed beneath a pale winter sun yesterday in Dorchester County, becoming the first of their species to migrate to the Chesapeake Bay in 180 years.The birds ended their two-day, 103-mile journey as they began it -- in the wake of an ultralight airplane piloted by Canadian biologist Gavin Shire, whom the birds regard as their mother."Flying over the bay was great," Shire said after all three birds had safely followed him onto the grassy field between the Honga River and Charles Creek.
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