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BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | February 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- A group of shipping lines plans to raise freight rates from the West Coast to Europe by approximately 10 percent on March 15, officials of the group said.Prices will increase by $100 for a 20-foot container, $200 for a 40-foot unit and $250 for a refrigerated box, said Allan Peicher, regional commercial manager in San Francisco for the USA-North Europe Rate Agreement.The members of the agreement are Atlantic Container Line, Compagnie Generale Maritime, Hapag-Lloyd AG, Maersk Line, Nedlloyd Lines BV, P&O Containers Ltd. and Sea-Land Service Inc.Currently, the rate for shipping a 20-foot container to Europe is about $1,000, he estimated.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Two large ships being unloaded at the Dundalk Marine Terminal in Baltimore shifted away from the berth where they were docked amid strong winds Wednesday night, snapping the lines tying them down and damaging a crane, according to officials at the port of Baltimore. The roll-on, roll-off ships, containing heavy machinery, farm equipment and other vehicles, are owned by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, one of the port's largest roll-on, roll-off customers, said Richard Scher, a spokesman for the Maryland Port Administration.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton | October 9, 1994
After suffering a dramatic decline during the 1980s, the port of Baltimore has seen a resurgence during the past two years, with shipping lines adding service and bringing more cargo here. During the first six months of this year alone, the amount of cargo is up 18 percent. That means more jobs for the multitude of businesses that depend on coming and going of ships.Can the state count on that growth to continue? Here, shipping )) executives discuss what factors prompted them to choose the port of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
Taiwan-based Evergreen Marine Corp. will sign today an agreement to continue service to Baltimore for 10 years as it eyes an increase in traffic between the East Coast and Asia. The new longer-term contract keeps Evergreen's guarantee to move at least 40,000 loaded containers through Seagirt Marine Terminal annually. Evergreen is the second largest container line operating in the port and the only one to provide direct service to Asia, a market port officials have tried to expand in recent years.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
If you're looking for someone to blame for the slippery road conditions in the wake of last week's icy weather, you might want to look east. Far East. Shipping lines are so busy handling China's import-export needs that road salt companies are having trouble finding vessels to transport their supplies from overseas, said International Salt Co. Chief Executive Officer Robert Jones. Those shipping delays translate into low salt reserves in Maryland, where International Salt supplies the state and several counties.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
THE LAST THING the port of Baltimore needs is legislation that effectively raises the price of doing business on the city's waterfront. Yet that is what the state Senate has achieved in a bill that would create a costly monopoly for the people who dock and steer ships that call on Baltimore. At the moment, there are two kinds of maritime pilots serving the port: Bay pilots, who bring the big cargo ships up the Chesapeake as far as the Francis Scott Key Bridge, and docking pilots, who work for tugboat firms and guide these mammoth vessels until they are safely berthed.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
Shipping lines told legislators yesterday that a bill passed last year has led to a 50 percent increase in docking fees and created a new monopoly that could drive costs even higher for the port of Baltimore. But a representative for the docking pilots said the law was working "absolutely flawlessly." Members of the House Economic Matters Committee heard the widely divergent views during a briefing to update them on the effects of legislation that put under state regulation the port's 10 pilots who guide ships into their berths.
NEWS
By Richard C. Clements LTC | July 14, 1996
I READ WITH disgust the July 7 editorial ("A plan for the port") on the future plans for the port of Baltimore as indicated by its new executive director, Tay Yoshitani, the former deputy director of the port of Los Angeles.He seems to be conceding that Baltimore will never be a powerhouse like L.A. and we should accept that. This loser attitude is not acceptable to me as a citizen or as a businessman with a vested interest in the port of Baltimore.My entire industry depends on the port being available to be used by shippers to transport scrap paper to overseas markets.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
Maersk Line of Denmark, already one of the biggest shipping lines in the port of Baltimore, plans to increase calls here by 25 percent as a result of the company's decision to expand service to South America.Starting in January, Maersk will route three containerships through Baltimore on their trips from New York to the West Coast of South America and back.That will add 24 more regular calls a year -- roughly one every two weeks -- at the port of Baltimore."It means new ships coming into the port, and that provides hours of labor for the bay pilots and the longshoremen in the port, plus business for truckers and rails," said Adrian G. Teel, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1998
Two giants of the shipping industry are eyeing the port of Baltimore for a major new East Coast cargo terminal.But if Baltimore fits the companies' plans, port officials will have to figure out how to fit the company's ships into Baltimore.Maersk Inc. and Sea-Land Service Inc., two steamship lines considering the port as a site for a new cargo hub, sail the largest containerships afloat.Some of the ships are 1,138 feet long -- longer than aircraft carriers -- and 140 wide, the equivalent of 17 tractor-trailers placed side-by-side.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
Just about any given time, it's possible to find a Greek-owned ship flying a Liberian flag, employing a Filipino crew and carrying cargo from China into a U.S. port terminal managed by a British company that hires American longshoremen. This is how Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Target and others get their socks and stereos for the U.S. consumer. So, some in the shipping industry have been taken aback in the past week by growing criticism in Washington and in state capitals to a deal that would transfer control over some operations in several major U.S. ports from a British company to one owned by the government of Dubai.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2004
Energized by news that the popular Carnival Cruise Lines will not sail from Baltimore's port next year, a group of business and tourism leaders say they'll push the governor to finance a modern cruise ship terminal before more ships slip away. Three of Baltimore's five cruise lines have signaled they will not return next year, which local leaders called a troubling trend for the promising cruise business. While none of the lines publicly blamed the current facility, a metal shed sandwiched between cranes and tractors at Dundalk Marine Terminal, the advocates said a little passenger pampering in a less industrial setting would surely help Baltimore thrive in a competitive business that has increasingly targeted smaller ports.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
If you're looking for someone to blame for the slippery road conditions in the wake of last week's icy weather, you might want to look east. Far East. Shipping lines are so busy handling China's import-export needs that road salt companies are having trouble finding vessels to transport their supplies from overseas, said International Salt Co. Chief Executive Officer Robert Jones. Those shipping delays translate into low salt reserves in Maryland, where International Salt supplies the state and several counties.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
Helen Delich Bentley, who, at 78, would be the second-oldest member of the House of Representatives if she's elected, is daring people to call her old. "For those of you who don't know me, I've been around Baltimore for two centuries," the former congresswoman said, eliciting laughter at a political forum in a Reisterstown synagogue. "I gave birth to the port, and I'm still plugging away at it." She gave a quick speech, apologized to the crowd and left, off to a dinner for one of the main shipping lines in the port of Baltimore.
NEWS
August 18, 2001
BALTIMORE-Washington Airport and the port of Baltimore find themselves locked in bureaucratic straitjackets imposed by state government. Not surprisingly, they can't keep up with their privatized competitors. The port has suffered because of the state's refusal to give it the flexibility to negotiate deals quickly with shipping lines the way other ports do. What would take a matter of weeks in Norfolk's independent port, for instance, could take months in Baltimore, one of the few ports owned and operated by state government.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
Shipping lines told legislators yesterday that a bill passed last year has led to a 50 percent increase in docking fees and created a new monopoly that could drive costs even higher for the port of Baltimore. But a representative for the docking pilots said the law was working "absolutely flawlessly." Members of the House Economic Matters Committee heard the widely divergent views during a briefing to update them on the effects of legislation that put under state regulation the port's 10 pilots who guide ships into their berths.
NEWS
December 6, 1993
Before the cheering starts, backers of hefty new subsidies to United States shipping lines had better read the fine print of a bill passed recently by the House. There's no money to pay for the $1.2 billion, 10-year handout.Yes, the maritime subsidy bill surmounted a big hurdle. Yes, the program would keep a portion of this country's small ocean-going fleet in business. Yes, the bill contains a few provisions to prod the industry to cut overhead costs and improve efficiency. But the bill is flat-out stalled in the Senate until someone comes up with a funding source.
NEWS
August 18, 2001
BALTIMORE-Washington Airport and the port of Baltimore find themselves locked in bureaucratic straitjackets imposed by state government. Not surprisingly, they can't keep up with their privatized competitors. The port has suffered because of the state's refusal to give it the flexibility to negotiate deals quickly with shipping lines the way other ports do. What would take a matter of weeks in Norfolk's independent port, for instance, could take months in Baltimore, one of the few ports owned and operated by state government.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
Leaders of three Longshoremen's locals think they might have enough votes to win approval for a key contract with the port of Baltimore's largest shipping line, possibly paving the way for the development of a new cargo hub in the city. The news comes one week after members of Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association voted 235-189 to reject the contract addendum, leaving port officials worried that Scandinavian steamship company Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines might reject Baltimore as the site of its proposed East Coast cargo hub. Members of Local 1429 of the ILA will vote today to decide whether to accept work rule changes requested by Wallenius Wilhelmsen, which has made the union concessions a cornerstone of its proposed expansion in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Local Longshoremen voted 235-189 yesterday against work rules concessions that would have all but cemented plans for the port of Baltimore's largest shipping line to establish a new cargo hub in the city. Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines, the world's largest automobile carrier, previously threatened to begin negotiations with other ports unless the contract was approved. Without the labor concessions, the company has said, Baltimore is not competitive with other East Coast ports. Local 333 of the International Longshoremen's Association had rejected a similar contract addendum in a 357-57 vote April 10. Union members said they don't expect another vote on the issue.
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