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By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 2002
SAN DIEGO - A new labor agreement between West Coast dockworkers and shipping companies is expected to help speed the flow of goods to the nation's stores and manufacturers, just in time for the holiday shopping season. Representatives of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association, which represents shipping companies, signed the six-year agreement early yesterday after weeks of negotiations that were ordered by President Bush and led by federal mediators.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A Japanese shipping line will pay a nearly $70 million fine after agreeing to plead guilty to fixing prices and rigging bids for services at the port of Baltimore, the Justice Department said Friday. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., or K-Line, is the latest ocean carrier charged in a massive antitrust investigation of companies that federal officials say have conspired to drive up international shipping prices. K-Line, which was charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Friday, provides shipping services for roll-on, roll-off cargo — including cars, trucks and construction equipment — to and from the U.S. and elsewhere.
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NEWS
By Kim Clark | January 17, 1991
The outbreak of war will likely cause further turmoil in Baltimore's troubled port, shipping industry officials said last night.Even before U.S. aircraft began attacking Iraq, the six-month buildup for war in the Persian Gulf had cut the number of shipping lines coming to the port.Shortly after Iraq invaded Kuwait Aug. 2, several governments, vTC including those of Britain and the United States, chartered ships that had been making calls here to move military equipment to the Middle East, the officials said.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
The longshoremen's dispute at the Port of Baltimore is probably not about wages ( "Cargo being diverted as port labor standoff continues," Jan. 17). Articles in The Sun have only mentioned that "rookie" (i.e. apprentice) wages will double and all wages will increase 45 percent overall in the next 6 years. No one would be against that. This is obviously about health care, pensions and retirement. I know nothing of ILA 333's contract or negotiations. Nor do I know any member of 333. As a union member, I do know about contracts.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2004
LOCALLY Legg Mason Inc. Shares of the Baltimore investment house tumbled $2.03, or 3 percent, to $63.55 yesterday, losing three-quarters of its post-election gain Thursday and Friday, when the market roared upward. NATIONALLY Symbol Technologies Inc. The company, whose bar-code scanners are used by retailers and shipping companies, fell $1.09 to $14.11. Symbol trimmed its earlier 2004 profit prediction by 2 cents a share, to 22 cents, because of accounting errors and delayed filing its quarterly report.
NEWS
By Richard C. Clements LTC | July 14, 1996
I READ WITH disgust the July 7 editorial ("A plan for the port") on the future plans for the port of Baltimore as indicated by its new executive director, Tay Yoshitani, the former deputy director of the port of Los Angeles.He seems to be conceding that Baltimore will never be a powerhouse like L.A. and we should accept that. This loser attitude is not acceptable to me as a citizen or as a businessman with a vested interest in the port of Baltimore.My entire industry depends on the port being available to be used by shippers to transport scrap paper to overseas markets.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | June 30, 1993
Angered by the federal government's failure to enact maritime reform, the nation's two largest container shipping companies said yesterday that they would seek to register part of their fleets under foreign flags.Sea-Land Service Inc., the nation's largest container shipping company and a unit of the CSX Corp., filed an application yesterday with the U.S. Transportation Department to transfer registry of 13 of its 41 U.S.-flag vessels to the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean.Also yesterday, American President Cos., the second-largest U.S. container shipping company, announced that it intended to reflag six of its 15 Pacific fleet vessels and to register six new vessels in foreign countries as well.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Retail giants, shipping companies and federal agencies are racing the clock to make plans as an East Coast and Gulf dock strike this weekend appears imminent. The International Longshoremen's Association, representing nearly 15,000 dockworkers from Maine to Texas, and the U.S. Maritime Alliance, which represents shipping companies and port operators, are scheduled to meet with a federal mediator Saturday afternoon in a last-ditch effort to head off a crippling work stoppage. In Baltimore, about 1,200 workers are represented by the union.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1994
The Clinton administration yesterday proposed a $1 billion plan to subsidize the dwindling number of U.S.-flag merchant ships, but the plan immediately drew criticism from Baltimore and other cities, which said the proposed fees for funding the subsidies will drive business away from U.S. ports.The legislation, which would provide $100 million-a-year subsidies for 10 years, is the second part of the administration's strategy for reviving the country's ailing maritime industry.Last year, the administration proposed subsidies for the shipbuilding industry -- a measure that could significantly help Baltimore's Sparrows Point shipyard.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1994
The Clinton administration yesterday proposed a $1 billion plan to subsidize the dwindling number of U.S. flagged ships, but the plan immediately drew criticism from Baltimore and other cities, who said the proposed fees for funding the legislation will drive business away from U.S. ports.The legislation, which would provide $100 million-a-year subsidies for 10 years, is the second part of the administration's strategy for reviving the country's ailing maritime industry. Last year, the administration proposed subsidies for the shipbuilding industry -- a measure that could significantly help Baltimore's Sparrows Point shipyard.
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | June 20, 2013
At a time when the election of a new, allegedly "moderate" president of Iran has created much excitement and raised many expectations, a more sober assessment of the nature of the Iranian regime is found in the annual report on terrorism issued by the State Department last month. As described in the report, terrorist activity in Iran "has reached a tempo unseen since the 1990s, with attacks plotted in Southeast Asia, Europe and Africa. " Iran provides financial, material and logistical support to the Taliban, Iraqi Shiite militant groups and Hezbollah, all of which have killed American soldiers, as well as to Hamas and other Palestinian terrorist groups that routinely target Israeli civilians.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The union representing 14,500 East Coast and Gulf longshoremen and the representative of 43 port operators and shipping companies completed negotiations on a six-year deal, a federal mediator announced Wednesday afternoon. The terms of the Master Agreement will now go to the respective memberships of the International Longshoremen's Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance for ratification, said George Cohen, director of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The Port of Baltimore has about 1,200 dockworkers represented by four locals.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Retail giants, shipping companies and federal agencies are racing the clock to make plans as an East Coast and Gulf dock strike this weekend appears imminent. The International Longshoremen's Association, representing nearly 15,000 dockworkers from Maine to Texas, and the U.S. Maritime Alliance, which represents shipping companies and port operators, are scheduled to meet with a federal mediator Saturday afternoon in a last-ditch effort to head off a crippling work stoppage. In Baltimore, about 1,200 workers are represented by the union.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
FedEx will pay $8 million to settle a lawsuit filed by a former Crofton shipping center employee accusing the company of defrauding the federal government. Mary Garofolo, who worked for FedEx for 23 years before retiring in May 2007, filed suit against the company under the federal whistle-blower statute after complaints to her supervisors about the scheme were ignored, she said. Her suit was filed under seal to enable government investigators to look into her allegations, which centered on a fraudulent billing scheme involving thousands of late deliveries that FedEx falsely blamed on 9/11-related security delays.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
A fortress of tony condominiums and townhouses now stands on the grounds of the old Bethlehem Steel shipyard at the base of Federal Hill. The city's Fire Department Repair Facility down the road is slated to be sold for more waterfront residential development. And cargo vessels long ago gave way to the pleasure boats that now dock at the Baltimore Museum of Industry's adjoining sailing school. The Lynch brothers, owners of General Ship Repair Corp., see the writing on the wall. One of the few remaining industrial outfits on Key Highway's Inner Harbor rim, the fourth-generation family business is eyeing a move to Canton after nearly 80 years at its present location.
NEWS
December 19, 2007
Charles Frederick Lynch, chairman of the board of General Ship Repair Corp. and a Severn School benefactor, died of heart failure Monday at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Severna Park resident was 81. Mr. Lynch was born in Baltimore and raised in Severna Park in Anne Arundel County. He graduated from Severn School in 1944 and received a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1948. He worked for a Baltimore metal-fabrication company before joining the family-owned Key Highway ship repair yard that had been founded by his father, Charles B. Lynch, in 1924.
NEWS
December 31, 1998
TWO major challenges await Gov. Parris N. Glendening as he looks ahead to the new year. Both concern jobs, and economic growth, for Maryland.It could take an expensive state commitment to keep Marriott International's headquarters in Maryland and to gain a much-coveted shipping contract from two maritime giants to use facilities at the Port of Baltimore. But the outlays would be worth every penny.Here's why.Hotel giant Marriott has outgrown its Bethesda headquarters after a quarter century.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
The union representing 14,500 East Coast and Gulf longshoremen and the representative of 43 port operators and shipping companies completed negotiations on a six-year deal, a federal mediator announced Wednesday afternoon. The terms of the Master Agreement will now go to the respective memberships of the International Longshoremen's Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance for ratification, said George Cohen, director of Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. The Port of Baltimore has about 1,200 dockworkers represented by four locals.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
A New Orleans-based ship operator has promised to pay a $1 million fine for pollution violations after a Coast Guard investigation in Baltimore led to the discovery of the improper discharge of hundreds of thousands of gallons of oil-contaminated waste. Pacific-Gulf Marine Inc. (PGM) agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges that it allowed four of its ships to dump untreated waste, the Justice Department announced yesterday. As part of the plea agreement, the company will also pay $500,000 for community service.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2006
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- Under intense pressure from shipping companies concerned about costly delays, the Coast Guard is tipping off some large commercial ships about security searches that had been a surprise, high-ranking Coast Guard officials said. The searches began after the Sept. 11 attacks as part of a major revamping of the Coast Guard and its new anti-terrorism mission. But shipping companies say the surprise boardings at sea cause unnecessary delays, costing up to $40,000 an hour.
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