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By Bob Tedeschi and Bob Tedeschi,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1999
Car dealers have a reputation for waiting until the last minute to reveal hidden charges to unwary customers.The Internet may be developing a similar syndrome -- call it clicker shock -- as retailers acquire a reputation for hiding shipping and handling charges until the final stage of the transaction. Consumers who reach that point face an unsavory choice: swallow higher-than-expected prices, or abandon the purchase, often after investing time filling out a registration form and possibly giving out a credit card number.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Denver Post | February 15, 2004
Another Valentine's Day has come and gone. And for the lovelorn, the luckless and the just plain lonesome, it can be one heartless holiday. But now, at least for men, there's a new source of solace: the imaginary girlfriend. OK, maybe that's not such a new idea for some guys. But this companion promises to fulfill one's fantasies, yet doesn't have to be explained away like an inflatable doll. And we're not talking phone or Internet sex, but made-up love notes -- sweet nothings in the truest sense.
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FEATURES
By Deborah Lawson and Deborah Lawson,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 21, 1994
How you respond to pet emergencies may mean the difference between life or death for your animal. Besides keeping the phone number of your veterinarian in a prominent place, you should consider having a pet first-aid book in the house.Perhaps the best pet owners' first-aid manuals on the market are "The Home Pet Vet Guide: Dogs" and "The Home Pet Vet Guide: Cats" by Marvin I. Green ($7.95 plus $2 shipping and handling each in paperback; Berkshire Studio, West Stockbridge, Mass. 01260). These books contain lucid, fast-reading instructions for action in many emergencies.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong | December 1, 2003
Remember when grandpa used to grumble about how a chocolate bar only cost him a few pennies in the good ol' days? Well, hide the latest Godiva Chocolatier catalog, because the poor old guy just might keel over. Chocolate has reached a new extreme of decadence, as illustrated by the 24-Karat Tower with Signature Ribbon, a 7-pound, 4.95-ounce mountain of truffles, chocolates and other confections, priced at an anything-but-modest $250. Have a taste for a richer flavor? How about the new 12-Month Godiva Gift Ensemble, for $350?
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 7, 1998
Shoppers who have been skeptical about catalog merchants' shipping and handling charges might be interested in a new survey.According to a study in the next issue of Catalog Age, a trade publication for the mail-order industry, 48 percent of catalog businesses this year said they made a profit from shipping and handling charges, up from 44 percent the year before. About 41 percent said they broke even, and 11 percent said they lost money.These findings come as no surprise to many shoppers who say they're drawn to the time-saving advantages of catalog shopping, especially during the hectic holiday season.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein | April 30, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesHave a ballBeach balls by On the Wall Productions could be the hottest thing on the sand this summer -- at least with the international set. The balls, called Globals, come in four styles: a Northwest Indian Global decorated with patterns from a blanket of the Tlingit tribe; a Japanese Edo Kite Global, with colorful reproductions of Japanese warriors; an African Global, based on the patterns of the kente cloth of...
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong | December 1, 2003
Remember when grandpa used to grumble about how a chocolate bar only cost him a few pennies in the good ol' days? Well, hide the latest Godiva Chocolatier catalog, because the poor old guy just might keel over. Chocolate has reached a new extreme of decadence, as illustrated by the 24-Karat Tower with Signature Ribbon, a 7-pound, 4.95-ounce mountain of truffles, chocolates and other confections, priced at an anything-but-modest $250. Have a taste for a richer flavor? How about the new 12-Month Godiva Gift Ensemble, for $350?
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | December 16, 1996
Commemorate the fiber things in life with works of art made from asparagus, carrots, scallions and eggplants. Designed for looking, not cooking, each one-of-a-kind vegetable is freeze-dried and mounted in an air-tight frame by an artist trained in the simple yet complex techniques of vegetable art. Nothing will speak quite as eloquently to your vegetarian friends as this gift of roughage. Intended to evoke the enduring relationship between humans and their roots, these crudite creations surely will grow into treasured family heirlooms.
NEWS
By Mia D. McNeil and Mia D. McNeil,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Minutes are ticking away until the 2000 presidential election, and thanks to Election Watch 2000, voters will know just how many. Jack Goldenberg and Andrew Gillinson have bought the rights for their company, Election Watch 2000, to manufacture wristwatches bearing the faces of Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush. "We were trying to find a subtle way for people to show their political affiliation," Gillinson said. Goldenberg and Gillinson met in 1986 when they began working together at an advertising agency in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | December 4, 1995
NEW YORK -- IN SLOW Christmas selling seasons like thi one, it pays to be a last-minute shopper. Discounts will get bigger and better as the holiday nears.You might even want to skip Christmas catalogs this year.Catalogs are wonderfully convenient (I use them myself). But you often pay more for the same types of items you'll find in the mall. It's especially hard for catalogs to compete when stores cut prices to the bone.Still, you can't beat a catalog if you're so busy that time is more important than money.
TRAVEL
October 8, 2000
Still a good man, Charlie Brown It's been nearly eight months since the death of Peanuts' creator Charles M. Schulz, but in the hearts of many of his fans, he'll live on forever. And now, another generation can get exposure to Charlie Brown and his gang through a new museum exhibit. The interactive "Good Grief!" show, based on the Peanuts comics strip, debuted yesterday at the Children's Museum of Manhattan. Designed to help visitors understand the views of others and the importance of teamwork, the display brings to life the childhood trials of the Peanuts clan, including Charlie Brown's quest to kick the football and Linus' relationship with his beloved blanket.
NEWS
By Mia D. McNeil and Mia D. McNeil,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Minutes are ticking away until the 2000 presidential election, and thanks to Election Watch 2000, voters will know just how many. Jack Goldenberg and Andrew Gillinson have bought the rights for their company, Election Watch 2000, to manufacture wristwatches bearing the faces of Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush. "We were trying to find a subtle way for people to show their political affiliation," Gillinson said. Goldenberg and Gillinson met in 1986 when they began working together at an advertising agency in Baltimore.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | December 12, 1999
I'VE GOT A great deal for you this holiday sales season. A brand new car for only $10,000. Yep, that's what I'm selling it for.Of course, that's after a $5,000 trade-in (or equivalent cash).And my price assumes you qualify for the $1,000 rebate given to veterans of the Spanish-American War.And there's the customary charge for transportation of the vehicle from the factory to my house. That shouldn't add more than $1,000 to the total.Pay for shipping?What? You think that I should pay for the shipment of the product to my house?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | August 22, 1999
It's the bane of anyone who works in an open office: All day long, people come by your desk or cubicle and talk, even if you're busy. What can you do? Some people wear headphones or write on chalkboards to note when they're not free to chat. Others hang curtains. But now there's another solution.The partners of Ai, a national architecture and interior design firm based in Washington, have designed a product called Protoblocs to help the estimated 25 million office workers in America who have no office doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Tedeschi and Bob Tedeschi,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1999
Car dealers have a reputation for waiting until the last minute to reveal hidden charges to unwary customers.The Internet may be developing a similar syndrome -- call it clicker shock -- as retailers acquire a reputation for hiding shipping and handling charges until the final stage of the transaction. Consumers who reach that point face an unsavory choice: swallow higher-than-expected prices, or abandon the purchase, often after investing time filling out a registration form and possibly giving out a credit card number.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 7, 1998
Shoppers who have been skeptical about catalog merchants' shipping and handling charges might be interested in a new survey.According to a study in the next issue of Catalog Age, a trade publication for the mail-order industry, 48 percent of catalog businesses this year said they made a profit from shipping and handling charges, up from 44 percent the year before. About 41 percent said they broke even, and 11 percent said they lost money.These findings come as no surprise to many shoppers who say they're drawn to the time-saving advantages of catalog shopping, especially during the hectic holiday season.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1997
Entek Corp., which produces and markets crop protection products, has started moving its headquarters to Elkridge from Brea, Calif.Company President Todd Taylor said the move will bring it closer Southeastern and Midwestern customers, competitors it works with on projects, investors and government agencies involved with the agriculture industry.Entek sells insecticides, pesticides, fungicides and its main product, CottonQuik, prepares cotton plants for picking."The East Coast is where all the other agri-chemical companies are," Taylor said.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1997
Entek Corp., which produces and markets crop protection products, has started moving its headquarters to Elkridge from Brea, Calif.Company President Todd Taylor said the move will bring it closer Southeastern and Midwestern customers, competitors it works with on projects, investors and government agencies involved with the agriculture industry.Entek sells insecticides, pesticides, fungicides and its main product, CottonQuik, prepares cotton plants for picking."The East Coast is where all the other agri-chemical companies are," Taylor said.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | December 16, 1996
Commemorate the fiber things in life with works of art made from asparagus, carrots, scallions and eggplants. Designed for looking, not cooking, each one-of-a-kind vegetable is freeze-dried and mounted in an air-tight frame by an artist trained in the simple yet complex techniques of vegetable art. Nothing will speak quite as eloquently to your vegetarian friends as this gift of roughage. Intended to evoke the enduring relationship between humans and their roots, these crudite creations surely will grow into treasured family heirlooms.
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