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December 10, 2004
Raymond Fillmore DeVinney, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipbuilding official, died of heart failure Dec. 1 at a hospital in Columbia, S.C. The former Cockeysville and Timonium resident was 72. Born in Elizabeth, N.J., and raised in Union, N.J., he earned a bachelor's degree in marine transportation in 1954 from the State University of New York Maritime College at Fort Schuyler and served two years as an officer in the Navy's Military Sea Transport Service....
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Although it leads the East Coast in several categories of shipping activity, the port of Baltimore often seems to be hiding in plain sight. So officials used the Saturday observance of National Maritime Day to throw open a pier at the Canton Marine Terminal and invite 28 businesses and agencies that call the port home to hold a career day. "It's the first time we've done this," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, for whom the port is named....
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
Walter E. Shade Sr., a nationally known shipbuilding figure whose career spanned more than 50 years and who retired as general manager of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Key Highway shipyard, died Tuesday from complications of a stroke at North Arundel Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Severna Park. "He made Key Highway the premier ship-repair yard in the world and was fully committed to being able to repair the largest ships. He had an illustrious career and was well-respected in the business," said Lewis F. Sensenbach, former comptroller of the Key Highway yard.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
Edwin F. Royston, who played two years as a guard for the New York Giants in the late 1940s and was a shipbuilding executive, died of cancer Saturday at his home in Seaside Park, N.J. He was 87 and had lived in Highlandtown. Born in Baltimore and raised on Macon Street, he was a 1941 graduate of Patterson Park High School, where he played football. He was nominated for the 1940 Unsung Hero Award. While at the school, he met his future wife, the former Virginia Garner. He served in the Navy during World War II and then earned a physics degree from Wake Forest University, where he was named All Southern guard in 1947 and co-captain of the team.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
Recent news reports announced that the John W. Brown, one of the nation's two surviving World War II Liberty Ships, will have a permanent home by 2003 at a new 500-foot-long Key Highway pier between the Baltimore Museum of Industry and General Ship Repair.The pier is part of a $8.5 million project for the Inner Harbor sponsored by the Museum of Industry and the nonprofit Project Liberty Ship, which owns and restored the John W. Brown.For years, the ship, much off the beaten tourist track, has been tied up at the old Pennsylvania Railroad pier on Clinton Street in Canton.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Sixteen months ago, Anglo-Norwegian conglomerate Kvaerner ASA vowed to revive the United States' virtually extinct commercial shipbuilding business, extracting more than $400 million in public subsidies to transform the closed Philadelphia Naval Shipyard into one of the most modern commercial shipyards in the world.Yesterday, as part of a plan to drain off debt, a foundering Kvaerner said it would jettison its worldwide ship-making business -- selling it, creating a joint-venture partnership or spinning it off to shareholders -- while promising none of these options would scuttle the "Philadelphia Experiment."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1997
Officials of WHX Corp. and the union that represents most of BethShip Inc.'s workers have met for the first time to discuss the New York-based company's interest in buying the Sparrows Point yard, union officials said yesterday."
NEWS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Brenda Buote contributed to this article | October 31, 1996
BethShip Inc., the Sparrows Point yard where Navy shipbuilding pushed employment to 4,000 two decades ago, will be sold or shut down in a decision that jeopardizes the shipyard's 700 remaining jobs.Bethlehem Steel Corp., the yard's parent company, said the decision was made as part of a restructuring plan that includes closing or selling three other struggling divisions that employ more than 1,500 people.The announcement came a week after Bethlehem said it had hired Chase Securities Inc. to explore the future of BethShip.
BUSINESS
By a Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Fruehauf Trailer Corp., an Indianapolis, Ind.-based maker of truck trailers, has agreed to reinstate medical coverage to about 400 blue-collar retirees of the defunct Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.Wednesday night's action came after Senior U.S. District Judge Herbert N. Maletz last Friday issued a temporary restraining order restoring medical benefits to 300 other retirees of Maryland Shipbuilding. A hearing for a similar order for the blue-collar workers was scheduled for yesterday in Detroit before the agreement with the company was reached, according to John T. Ward, the retirees' attorney.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Navy wants to increase its fleet to 313 ships by 2020, reversing years of decline in naval shipbuilding and adding dozens of warships designed to defeat emerging adversaries, senior Defense Department officials say. The plan by Adm. Michael G. Mullen, who took over as chief of naval operations last summer, envisions a major shipbuilding program that would increase the 281-ship fleet by 32 vessels and cost more than $13 billion a...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 24, 2011
John James Lambros, a retired Bethlehem Steel shipbuilding executive and decorated World War II veteran, died of a hemorrhage Monday at the Maples of Towson. He was 95 and lived in Ruxton. "He was the No. 1 salesman for the Bethlehem Steel Key Highway Shipyard," said former U.S. Maritime Commissioner Helen Delich Bentley, who also served in Congress. "It was through his influence with many Greek shipowners that Baltimore received so much of the ship construction and repair work. " She recalled his friendship with Aristotle Onassis, who placed a 1948 order with Bethlehem for a 28,000-ton supertanker.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2009
Chesapeake Shipbuilding said Wednesday that it has signed a contract to acquire about three acres of property adjacent to the shipyard. The acquisition would allow the company to expand and create as many as 125 new jobs. The land, located on the Wicomico River, is now an empty lot with a "derelict" bulkhead, the company said in a press release. The company designs and builds commercial steel vessels and has been in Salisbury for more than 30 years. - Andrea K. Walker
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2008
222 Severn Ave. has been the site of shipbuilding for the greater part of the 20th century. Military sea craft in both world wars came from the boatyard before it became the premier purveyor of luxury yachts. An exhibit, which opens Tuesday, traces the history of the boatyard complex in Eastport as well as the property owner's efforts to preserve much of the yard's historic layout. The exhibit caps a recently completed two-year renovation of the property's main building, known as the "big shed."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Navy wants to increase its fleet to 313 ships by 2020, reversing years of decline in naval shipbuilding and adding dozens of warships designed to defeat emerging adversaries, senior Defense Department officials say. The plan by Adm. Michael G. Mullen, who took over as chief of naval operations last summer, envisions a major shipbuilding program that would increase the 281-ship fleet by 32 vessels and cost more than $13 billion a...
NEWS
December 10, 2004
Raymond Fillmore DeVinney, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipbuilding official, died of heart failure Dec. 1 at a hospital in Columbia, S.C. The former Cockeysville and Timonium resident was 72. Born in Elizabeth, N.J., and raised in Union, N.J., he earned a bachelor's degree in marine transportation in 1954 from the State University of New York Maritime College at Fort Schuyler and served two years as an officer in the Navy's Military Sea Transport Service....
NEWS
April 30, 2004
William Charles Langston Sr., a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipbuilding official and Revolutionary War re-enactor, died of complications from a stroke April 23 at the Perry Point Veterans Affairs Hospital. The Parkville resident was 73. Mr. Langston was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1950 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and served in the Navy as a radar operator from 1951 to 1954 before earning a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
Services for Carl W. Schaller Sr., a former superintendent at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Barranco & Sons Severna Park Funeral Home, 501 Ritchie Highway.Mr. Schaller, a resident of Severna Park for 41 years, died Wednesday of cancer in Leesburg, Fla. He was 84.Mr. Schaller was born in Germany and came to the United States at the age of 19. He worked for Maryland Shipbuilding for more than 37 years, retiring as a superintendent in 1965.Mr.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | January 21, 1995
The families of nearly 700 retirees of the defunct Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. yesterday won back their health insurance -- for the time being, at least.Senior U.S. District Judge Herbert N. Maletz issued a temporary restraining order requiring Fruehauf Trailer Corp. to restore health insurance to the approximately 668 shipyard retirees and their spouses.Fruehauf cut off payments for medical and prescription insurance on Jan. 9.Yesterday's order also required the Southfield, Mich.
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