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NEWS
September 12, 2014
Canada may have given Baltimore a bi-centennial gift the other day when its prime minister announced the discovery of one of two Arctic exploration ships that were lost in the late 1840s. The two vessels, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were Royal Navy warships converted for use in Arctic exploration. Both names should be familiar to Baltimoreans because they belonged to two of the ships that participated in the bombardment of Ft. McHenry. The HMS Erebus that was lost in the Arctic was actually built in 1826 and named after the original Erebus that was here.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Coast Guard transported a 58-year-old woman off a cruise ship on the Potomac River Friday after she was injured in a fall. The woman — who was not identified — was taken to shore by a 45-foot response boat from the Coast Guard's Station St. Inigoes and then transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore by helicopter, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Jasmine Mieszala, a Coast Guard spokeswoman. The Coast Guard said a crew member from the Baltimore-based Grandeur of the Seas called for assistance around 10 p.m. Friday about 10 nautical miles off Smith Point in Charles County.
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NEWS
June 21, 2014
I have a suggestion on housing the illegal immigrant children ( "U.S. eyeing new Md. sites for immigrant children," June 18). All of our elected officials who are advocating that we move illegal immigrants from Texas to Maryland should adopt at least two of these children. They should prove their compassion by making them part of their family and paying their food, health and education bills. I feel sorry that these children were abandoned by parents who had no regard for their safety.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A Japanese shipping line will pay a nearly $70 million fine after agreeing to plead guilty to fixing prices and rigging bids for services at the port of Baltimore, the Justice Department said Friday. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., or K-Line, is the latest ocean carrier charged in a massive antitrust investigation of companies that federal officials say have conspired to drive up international shipping prices. K-Line, which was charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Friday, provides shipping services for roll-on, roll-off cargo — including cars, trucks and construction equipment — to and from the U.S. and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
The reproduction tall ship Pride of Baltimore II returned Friday to Baltimore's Inner Harbor after sailing the Chesapeake Bay, the East Coast and the Great Lakes for five months. The ship, which was built to look like a "1812-era topsail schooner privateer," will sail two more times — from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday — before ending its 2011season. Tickets are $45 for adults and $30 for children 12 and under. Free dockside tours of the deck will also be given between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. On Sunday, park rangers from Fort McHenry will be present on the ship and dressed in period uniforms to learn about the ship's operations from the crew.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Maryland's Department of Transportation asked the Board of Public Works on Wednesday to declare the state's goodwill ship Pride of Baltimore II to be "surplus property" so ownership can be transferred to the private nonprofit group that has operated the vessel since 1988. "We are confident that our organization is well-positioned to carry on that mission independently, and will continue to raise revenue for operations and success," said Linda Christenson, executive director of Pride of Baltimore Inc. The state paid $1 for title to the Pride II in 1989, after contributing $1 million in public funds toward the $4.5 million it cost to build the Baltimore clipper.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
St. Mary's College of Maryland said farewell to the most talked-about dormitory in its history on Sunday when the Sea Voyager, a 286-foot cruise ship, pulled up anchor. The ship, docked beside campus on the St. Mary's River, had housed 240 students since early November. The students, mostly freshmen and sophomores, were displaced from two residence halls by mold. After an extensive cleaning, those halls have been declared safe to re-enter by CEI, an environmental consulting agency, the college said.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | August 4, 2010
Once, this was a stout ship, with oak futtocks and floor timbers, fastened with iron nails, built with saw and adz and the calloused hands of shipwrights now long dead. Two centuries ago it was a simple coaster, hauling goods around the eastern capes, armed against pirates, and ending its days at a wharf in New York City. As the years went by, it sank into the harbor mud, entombed beneath what would one day become the World Trade Center site. Shortly after noon Monday, two trucks bearing the ship's unearthed skeleton pulled into a Maryland science complex on the shore of the Patuxent River in St. Leonard's, where scores of eager archaeologists and curators waited as if for the bones of a dinosaur.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
A century-old skipjack owned by the city and operated by the nonprofit Living Classrooms Foundation will run cruises and private charters in National Harbor this summer under a deal approved Wednesday by Baltimore's spending board. The Minnie V, one of the state's few remaining skipjacks — sailing vessels built to dredge for oysters in the Chesapeake Bay — will be operated by Potomac River Boating for the summer. The vessel, which dates to 1906, was renovated and has been maintained and run by the nonprofit group for educational programs and tours since 1996 under a deal with the city, said Living Classrooms CEO and President James Piper Bond.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
The largest load of sugar ever delivered to Domino Sugar's Baltimore refinery arrives aboard a ship on Monday. The Domino Sugars refinery will make history Monday morning when it is scheduled to receive the largest single raw sugar shipment ever to a port east of the Mississippi River, the company announced. More than 95 million pounds of raw sugar from Guatemala will be unloaded from the 623-foot bulk carrier Simon Schulte, more than 100 feet longer than the cargo ships that usually deliver sugar to the refinery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For two years, the crew of the USS Jeannette was trapped in ice north of the Bering Sea. The sailors staged musicals, played football, ate seal meat (which they dubbed "arctic turkey") and even performed surgery on the eye of a crew member afflicted with syphilis. Then, in June 1881, the real adventure began: The Jeannette sank. The men loaded their provisions onto dog sleds and began the trek to Siberia, some 1,000 miles away. Journalist Hampton Sides tells the story of the Jeannette's star-crossed expedition in his latest book, "In the Kingdom of Ice. " Sides spent more than three years poring over thousands of pages of records kept by the ship's captain, letters, diary entries and testimony from the 13 men who survived the brutal journey.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Canada may have given Baltimore a bi-centennial gift the other day when its prime minister announced the discovery of one of two Arctic exploration ships that were lost in the late 1840s. The two vessels, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were Royal Navy warships converted for use in Arctic exploration. Both names should be familiar to Baltimoreans because they belonged to two of the ships that participated in the bombardment of Ft. McHenry. The HMS Erebus that was lost in the Arctic was actually built in 1826 and named after the original Erebus that was here.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Constellation will be moved from its location in Baltimore's Inner Harbor for four months this winter to undergo more than $2 million in repairs - including $750,000 to fix rotting in its hull. The city Board of Estimates, which oversees spending in Baltimore, voted to approve the $750,000 expenditure for the ship, which has been docked in the harbor for almost 60 years. Money for the repairs comes from general obligation bonds approved by city voters in 2012. The ship will be dry-docked at the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay from Oct. 20 to Feb. 20 for the repairs, said Christopher Rowsom, director of Historic Ships in Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
When the Carnival Pride returns to Baltimore next spring, it will not only have new pollution-control technology and a $500 million makeover. The ship also will have a new itinerary of extended cruises to the Caribbean. Carnival Cruise Lines, which agreed this year to continue its round-trip service from Baltimore beginning in March 2015, will offer longer sailings to the Caribbean for the first time and a shorter getaway to the Bahamas. Carnival plans to continue its seven-day sailings from Baltimore to the Bahamas and the eastern Caribbean, and will add a number of cruises with special itineraries, including a series of 10- to 14-day trips between Baltimore and San Juan, Puerto Rico, with ports of call that include an exotic array of Caribbean destinations.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The U.S. Navy's Blue Angels and ships from six foreign countries will be coming to Baltimore in September for the city's Star - Spangled Spectacular celebration, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. As part of the commemoration of the Battle of Baltimore and bombardment of Fort McHenry, former Secretary of State Colin Powell will visit the fort the morning of Sept. 14. He will take part in an early-morning ceremony recalling the moment Francis Scott Key saw a giant flag flying over the fort and was inspired to write the poem that would become "The Star-Spangled Banner.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A conservation team from Maryland's archaeology lab is in Manhattan this week, working to recover the remains of a wooden sailing ship found buried at the World Trade Center site. The ship's fragile timbers are being extracted from the muck, wrapped, labeled and packed for shipment next week to the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, part of the Jefferson-Patterson Park & Museum in St. Leonard, where they will be treated so they may eventually be reassembled. The lab was built, in part, to conserve and store artifacts recovered from Maryland waters.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Cruise traffic at the port of Baltimore last year dipped slightly from 2011, snapping a four-year string of increases. Port officials said Wednesday that 240,676 people sailed on 100 cruises out of Baltimore, the second-highest count since year-round service started in 2009. In 2011, 251,889 passengers sailed on 105 cruises, a nearly 20 percent increase over the previous year. Cruise traffic is worth about $90 million in total economic value to the state and is responsible for about 220 jobs.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A Parkville man was convicted Monday of conspiring to ship industrial components to Iran in violation of the U.S. trade embargo on that country, the U.S. attorney's office announced. After a two-week trial in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, a jury found Ali Saboonchi, 34, guilty of one count of conspiracy and seven counts of illegally transporting U.S.-manufactured goods and services to Iran, the federal prosecutor's office said. The United States has outlawed commerce with Iran since 1995.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
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