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By Karol V. Menzie | May 14, 1997
Shake that shiitake into your recipesLove the rich, earthy flavor of Oriental dishes touched with shiitake mushrooms? Jo-San Shiitake Mushroom Sauce can be used over meat, fish, chicken, rice or vegetables. An 8-ounce bottle costs $3.50-$3.80, and has no fat, preservatives or MSG. Look for it soon at Metro/Basics supermarkets.The Mason-Dixon Wine Trail, a collection of Maryland-Pennsylvania wineries that offer discounts, gifts and access to promotions for Trailblazers who visit all of them, have added two more stops: Woodhall Vineyards of Parkton and Seven Valley Vineyards of Shrewsbury, Pa. (Others are Allegro, Brogue, Pa.; Boordy, Hydes, Md.; Fiore, Pylesville, Md.; and Naylor, Stewartstown, Pa.)
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By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 7, 2006
Inviting guests for wine and appetizers is far easier than cooking an entire meal. I certainly adhere to this philosophy when my schedule is hectic, but I still want to entertain. Recently, for example, when out-of-town friends e-mailed at the last minute to say they would be in my city for a few days, my first thought was to plan a small dinner party. But after looking at my calendar and finding it marked with commitments, I sent back a message asking our friends to stop by for wine and hors d'oeuvres, instead.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
One step was omitted in the recipe for linguine, crab and wild mushrooms that ran in yesterday's Food section.The clam-and-saffron mixture should be added to the skillet after the green onions and tomato paste. Simmer for two minutes before adding the crab and tarragon.+ The Sun regrets the error.Everybody knows what a mushroom is, right?Bet a pound of shiitake you don't have any idea.Misty Dodson lifts a plastic bag from a shelf full of similar plastic bags. It is mostly full of a mottled, organic-looking brown and white substance.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY | November 16, 2005
Fresh shiitakes are a relatively recent addition to the supermarket's produce section, but the dried version of these mushrooms has been widely available for years, especially at Asian markets under the label, "Chinese dried black mushroom." Cultivated for centuries in China and Japan, the shiitake (pronounced shee- TAH-kay) could be considered the Asian equivalent of the white mushroom for its ubiquitous popularity, according to the late Shizuo Tsuji, author of Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. For centuries, shiitake mushrooms have been used in Asia for colds and flu, poor circulation, upset stomachs and exhaustion.
FEATURES
By Teresa J. Farney and Teresa J. Farney,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 8, 1999
The greatest citrus fruit in the world isn't the navel orange, the Texas ruby-red grapefruit, the tangelo or even the versatile lemon.It's the Spanish clementine, a tangy but intensely sweet, juicy orange that makes its appearance from early November to mid-February.The first time I saw these seedless little gems, I was shopping in a Middle Eastern market in Virginia. The shopkeeper insisted I try one -- and I immediately became a fan.Even better, I learned that my beloved clementines are going to get even better because Spanish fruit inspectors have raised the bar on quality and brix (sugar)
FEATURES
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | May 15, 1996
I enjoyed this dish as an entree over roasted red bliss potatoes and have tried it over angel hair pasta and couscous. You can also serve it atop eggplant steaks or poultry and seafood. If you want to turn it into a great appetizer, top with melted mozzarella cheese.Garlicked spinach and mushroomsMakes 4 servings2 teaspoons olive oil1 teaspoon butter3 cloves garlic, minced2 cups button mushrooms, quartered1 cup shiitake mushrooms, quartered1 large portobello mushroom, diced1/2 cup dry red or white wine2 cups spinach leaves, torn into bite-size pieces1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce1/3 cup grated Parmesan1/2 teaspoon fresh black pepperHeat oil and butter in a large nonreactive skillet over medium-high heat.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
With the leaves gearing up to change colors, it's a good time to plan an outing to mountainous Western Maryland. The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce has put together a list of area farms open for tours, so while you're enjoying the foliage you can learn a thing or two about cultivating shiitake mushrooms and caring for alpacas. Call 301-334-6960 for a brochure, or call the farms below for hours and days of operation: The Learning Farm at Garrett Community College, McHenry; 301-387-3331 -- Guided tours of barns and barnyards as well as demonstrations of farming practices.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 13, 2005
Recently I was very fortunate to dine at a fabulous restaurant. While I was there, the chef prepared a mushroom risotto that was to die for. I must have that recipe (or at least something comparable)! Let's take a look at what makes a risotto great. First, you have to have the correct rice -- Italian arborio. You can make risotto out of other types of rice; you can even make a risotto type of dish from barley. But arborio rice makes it the best. The next critical ingredient is the cheese -- it must be real Parmigiano-Reggiano, not something that comes out of a can. When it comes to cooking risotto, remember a couple of things.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 7, 2006
Inviting guests for wine and appetizers is far easier than cooking an entire meal. I certainly adhere to this philosophy when my schedule is hectic, but I still want to entertain. Recently, for example, when out-of-town friends e-mailed at the last minute to say they would be in my city for a few days, my first thought was to plan a small dinner party. But after looking at my calendar and finding it marked with commitments, I sent back a message asking our friends to stop by for wine and hors d'oeuvres, instead.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN FOOD EDITOR | August 11, 2004
Delicious, yet low in calories Had a few too many hot dogs and beers this summer? If your shorts are getting a bit too tight, hereM-Fs a tasty, but low-calorie dinner suggestion from the Mushroom Information Center. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup teriyaki sauce, 1 teaspoon cornstarch, 1 teaspoon ground ginger and 1/2 cup water. Set aside. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 2 teaspoons of vegetable oil. Add 4 1/2 cups of sliced white mushrooms and 1 1/2 cups fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms with the stems removed.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 13, 2005
Recently I was very fortunate to dine at a fabulous restaurant. While I was there, the chef prepared a mushroom risotto that was to die for. I must have that recipe (or at least something comparable)! Let's take a look at what makes a risotto great. First, you have to have the correct rice -- Italian arborio. You can make risotto out of other types of rice; you can even make a risotto type of dish from barley. But arborio rice makes it the best. The next critical ingredient is the cheese -- it must be real Parmigiano-Reggiano, not something that comes out of a can. When it comes to cooking risotto, remember a couple of things.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN FOOD EDITOR | August 11, 2004
Delicious, yet low in calories Had a few too many hot dogs and beers this summer? If your shorts are getting a bit too tight, hereM-Fs a tasty, but low-calorie dinner suggestion from the Mushroom Information Center. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup teriyaki sauce, 1 teaspoon cornstarch, 1 teaspoon ground ginger and 1/2 cup water. Set aside. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat 2 teaspoons of vegetable oil. Add 4 1/2 cups of sliced white mushrooms and 1 1/2 cups fresh sliced shiitake mushrooms with the stems removed.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Late last month, good friends telephoned to invite us to dinner, but the week before the party, the hostess was called out of town because of an illness in her family. Hearing this, I was certain that the get-together would be canceled, but this was not the case. Arriving home just two days before the scheduled event, she called to assure us that she would be entertaining that evening. I couldn't imagine how she was going to undertake all the cooking herself, so I volunteered to bring a dish.
TRAVEL
September 16, 2001
With the leaves gearing up to change colors, it's a good time to plan an outing to mountainous Western Maryland. The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce has put together a list of area farms open for tours, so while you're enjoying the foliage you can learn a thing or two about cultivating shiitake mushrooms and caring for alpacas. Call 301-334-6960 for a brochure, or call the farms below for hours and days of operation: The Learning Farm at Garrett Community College, McHenry; 301-387-3331 -- Guided tours of barns and barnyards as well as demonstrations of farming practices.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 22, 2001
Paris, where my husband and I are living for several weeks this summer, always inspires me. Several nights ago, we invited a friend to join us for dinner at a small Left Bank restaurant. To begin the meal, our guest asked for the special of the day, Girolles a la Provencal. Delicious, firmly textured mushrooms that are a rich mustard-gold in color, girolles are beloved of French cooks. They arrived at the table in a little shallow casserole, piping hot and fragrant with the scent of garlic.
FEATURES
By Teresa J. Farney and Teresa J. Farney,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 8, 1999
The greatest citrus fruit in the world isn't the navel orange, the Texas ruby-red grapefruit, the tangelo or even the versatile lemon.It's the Spanish clementine, a tangy but intensely sweet, juicy orange that makes its appearance from early November to mid-February.The first time I saw these seedless little gems, I was shopping in a Middle Eastern market in Virginia. The shopkeeper insisted I try one -- and I immediately became a fan.Even better, I learned that my beloved clementines are going to get even better because Spanish fruit inspectors have raised the bar on quality and brix (sugar)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
OK, it's Saturday night, the grill is out, the coals are on, the hamburger patties are sitting on a plate, the ketchup and mustard are -- STOP!Nobody ever said grilling has to be boring.There's far more to the art of the grill than burgers and hot dogs: It can be as elegant as a fine chef's preparation without being a whole lot more trouble than simpler fare."If people look beyond the short grilling history in the United States and look at the way grilling works in other cultures," says Chris Schlesinger, the Massachusetts chef who is co-author of "The Thrill of the Grill" cookbook, they'll find out how useful a cooking tool the grill can be.In warmer climes, Mr. Schlesinger points out, "They use grilling -- as a regular cooking technique -- a normal, everyday cooking method."
NEWS
By BILL DALEY | November 16, 2005
Fresh shiitakes are a relatively recent addition to the supermarket's produce section, but the dried version of these mushrooms has been widely available for years, especially at Asian markets under the label, "Chinese dried black mushroom." Cultivated for centuries in China and Japan, the shiitake (pronounced shee- TAH-kay) could be considered the Asian equivalent of the white mushroom for its ubiquitous popularity, according to the late Shizuo Tsuji, author of Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art. For centuries, shiitake mushrooms have been used in Asia for colds and flu, poor circulation, upset stomachs and exhaustion.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 14, 1997
Shake that shiitake into your recipesLove the rich, earthy flavor of Oriental dishes touched with shiitake mushrooms? Jo-San Shiitake Mushroom Sauce can be used over meat, fish, chicken, rice or vegetables. An 8-ounce bottle costs $3.50-$3.80, and has no fat, preservatives or MSG. Look for it soon at Metro/Basics supermarkets.The Mason-Dixon Wine Trail, a collection of Maryland-Pennsylvania wineries that offer discounts, gifts and access to promotions for Trailblazers who visit all of them, have added two more stops: Woodhall Vineyards of Parkton and Seven Valley Vineyards of Shrewsbury, Pa. (Others are Allegro, Brogue, Pa.; Boordy, Hydes, Md.; Fiore, Pylesville, Md.; and Naylor, Stewartstown, Pa.)
FEATURES
By Steve Petusevsky and Steve Petusevsky,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | May 15, 1996
I enjoyed this dish as an entree over roasted red bliss potatoes and have tried it over angel hair pasta and couscous. You can also serve it atop eggplant steaks or poultry and seafood. If you want to turn it into a great appetizer, top with melted mozzarella cheese.Garlicked spinach and mushroomsMakes 4 servings2 teaspoons olive oil1 teaspoon butter3 cloves garlic, minced2 cups button mushrooms, quartered1 cup shiitake mushrooms, quartered1 large portobello mushroom, diced1/2 cup dry red or white wine2 cups spinach leaves, torn into bite-size pieces1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce1/3 cup grated Parmesan1/2 teaspoon fresh black pepperHeat oil and butter in a large nonreactive skillet over medium-high heat.
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