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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Seated around a long, rectangular table at a restaurant in Columbia last week, about 15 members of Howard County's Sherlock Holmes society each toasted an animal (or animals) from the stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The members raised their glasses to two dogs named Carlo (in The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Adventure of the Copper Beeches), a trained cormorant mentioned only as part of a previous (and unwritten) case in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger, and the titular Hound of the Baskervilles.
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NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Seated around a long, rectangular table at a restaurant in Columbia last week, about 15 members of Howard County's Sherlock Holmes society each toasted an animal (or animals) from the stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The members raised their glasses to two dogs named Carlo (in The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Adventure of the Copper Beeches), a trained cormorant mentioned only as part of a previous (and unwritten) case in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger, and the titular Hound of the Baskervilles.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | August 24, 1993
The title of a monograph written by Sherlock Holmes was rendered irregularly in yesterday's Sun. Instead of "The Distinction Between the Ashes of Various Cigarettes," the title was "Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos."The Sun regrets the errors.LONDON -- Sherlock Holmes remains alive, of course, and no more so than in his chambers at 221b Baker St. where it is always Victorian London and preferably foggy on the street below.We seem to have just missed him, the half-dozen of us who have climbed the 17 steps to the sitting room.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Seated around a long, rectangular table at a restaurant in Columbia last week, about 15 members of Howard County's Sherlock Holmes society each toasted an animal (or animals) from the stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The members raised their glasses to two dogs named Carlo (in The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Adventure of the Copper Beeches), a trained cormorant mentioned only as part of a previous (and unwritten) case in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger, and the titular Hound of the Baskervilles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jody Jaffe and Jody Jaffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
Plots. They're overrated in mysteries (and underrated in literary fiction). Sure, they're the engine that gets you there, but atmosphere and character linger far longer than who-done-it. You might forget who killed the city councilman in Scott Flander's terrific new book, Four to Midnight (William Morrow, 320 pages, $24.95), but you'll remember Sgt. Eddie North and the two cops under him whose lives get pummeled after they're accused of something they didn't do. Flander writes in a kind of lean, scrappy street poetry honed from years of covering cops for the pugnacious tabloid the Philadelphia Daily News.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Seated around a long, rectangular table at a restaurant in Columbia last week, about 15 members of Howard County's Sherlock Holmes society each toasted an animal (or animals) from the stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The members raised their glasses to two dogs named Carlo (in The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Adventure of the Copper Beeches), a trained cormorant mentioned only as part of a previous (and unwritten) case in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger, and the titular Hound of the Baskervilles.
NEWS
March 1, 2004
In celebration of Sherlock Holmes' 150th birthday, members of Watson's Tin Box, a local scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars, will introduce visitors to Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. March 25 at the Miller branch library. "We are a Sherlockian society. We study and talk about and have fellowship with other people who like Sherlock Holmes stories," said society member Ralph Adams, who lives in Ellicott City and volunteers at the library. The group does not do detective work in the style of Holmes.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
On a grim, gray day fit for murder in the Rue Morgue, the ardent Sherlockian Philip Sherman lurks near the tomb of Edgar Allan Poe in the Westminster Burying Grounds. A devoted adherent to the deductive reasoning of Sherlock Holmes, the great consulting detective, Sherman believes he's solved the mystery of the "Poe Toaster," the mysterious midnight visitor who appears at the tomb on Poe's Jan. 19 birthday, toasts the poet with cognac, leaves the bottle and three roses, then disappears.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Seated around a long, rectangular table at a restaurant in Columbia last week, about 15 members of Howard County's Sherlock Holmes society each toasted an animal (or animals) from the stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. The members raised their glasses to two dogs named Carlo (in The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Adventure of the Copper Beeches), a trained cormorant mentioned only as part of a previous (and unwritten) case in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger, and the titular Hound of the Baskervilles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
They gather together every other month for an evening of mystery and crime. These salespeople, lawyers, government workers, psychiatrists, bank employees and others seem an unlikely group to wallow in such debauchery.But their wallowing takes them back to earlier times. Much earlier. Those who gather are Sherlock Holmes aficionados, and darn proud of it, thank you. Now, one such group in Baltimore is celebrating 50 years of coming together to enjoy, dissect and discuss that "great Victorian detective" Sherlock Holmes and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jody Jaffe and Jody Jaffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
Plots. They're overrated in mysteries (and underrated in literary fiction). Sure, they're the engine that gets you there, but atmosphere and character linger far longer than who-done-it. You might forget who killed the city councilman in Scott Flander's terrific new book, Four to Midnight (William Morrow, 320 pages, $24.95), but you'll remember Sgt. Eddie North and the two cops under him whose lives get pummeled after they're accused of something they didn't do. Flander writes in a kind of lean, scrappy street poetry honed from years of covering cops for the pugnacious tabloid the Philadelphia Daily News.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | August 24, 1993
The title of a monograph written by Sherlock Holmes was rendered irregularly in yesterday's Sun. Instead of "The Distinction Between the Ashes of Various Cigarettes," the title was "Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos."The Sun regrets the errors.LONDON -- Sherlock Holmes remains alive, of course, and no more so than in his chambers at 221b Baker St. where it is always Victorian London and preferably foggy on the street below.We seem to have just missed him, the half-dozen of us who have climbed the 17 steps to the sitting room.
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