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Sherlock Holmes

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NEWS
September 14, 1995
Actor Jeremy Brett, 59, who immortalized the brilliant but troubled detective Sherlock Holmes on British television for 10 years, has died of heart failure.Hailed as the definitive Holmes, he died peacefully at his London home, a spokesman for Granada Television said yesterday."He was an actor of immense talent who has given us the defining characterization of Sherlock Holmes for years to come," said Rebecca Eaton, executive producer of MYSTERY! and Masterpiece Theater.His portrayal of Holmes was regarded as one of the finest.
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Maryland, meet Comptroller Peter Franchot's newest gimmick to convince you to collect more than $980 million in unclaimed property: Sherlock Franchot. This year's tongue-in-cheek campaign features Franchot as the beloved British detective Sherlock Holmes, complete with a calabash pipe, deerstalker hat and an "elementary" catch phrase. The campaign to reunite residents with lost property, waged every year, comes with a 151-page tabloid put in local newspapers that lists the tens of thousands of people whose lost cash and property ends up in the hands of the state of Maryland.  It also comes with a spoof YouTube video that opens with a deep movie-trailer voice.
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NEWS
March 1, 2004
In celebration of Sherlock Holmes' 150th birthday, members of Watson's Tin Box, a local scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars, will introduce visitors to Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. March 25 at the Miller branch library. "We are a Sherlockian society. We study and talk about and have fellowship with other people who like Sherlock Holmes stories," said society member Ralph Adams, who lives in Ellicott City and volunteers at the library. The group does not do detective work in the style of Holmes.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
A shocking and dastardly literary crime has been perpetrated upon a heretofore unsuspecting citizenry. How could you allow The Sun to publish such a travesty about the fictional sleuth Sherlock Holmes ("On the case," Dec. 23)? Contrary to what the writer claims, Sherlock Holmes was not the first consulting detective in modern literature, and Arthur Conan Doyle did not invent the police procedural. In fact, a character named C. Auguste Dupin was on the case nearly five decades before Holmes made his first appearance.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | August 24, 1993
The title of a monograph written by Sherlock Holmes was rendered irregularly in yesterday's Sun. Instead of "The Distinction Between the Ashes of Various Cigarettes," the title was "Upon the Distinction Between the Ashes of the Various Tobaccos."The Sun regrets the errors.LONDON -- Sherlock Holmes remains alive, of course, and no more so than in his chambers at 221b Baker St. where it is always Victorian London and preferably foggy on the street below.We seem to have just missed him, the half-dozen of us who have climbed the 17 steps to the sitting room.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
Robert Curtis Prem, an estate lawyer and avid Sherlock Holmes fan who had been active in local Republican politics, died Saturday of liver disease at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 70.At the time of his death, the longtime Original Northwood resident was of counsel to the law firm of Prem, Saltzman and Jablon Inc.Mr. Prem, who was considered an expert in estate planning, probate and trust administration, had practiced law with the Baltimore firm of Niles, Barton and Wilmer for 40 years before founding his own firm in 1985.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
The Elkridge library, 6540 Washington Blvd., will offer children ages 8 to 10 a chance to "Meet Sherlock Holmes," who will share his adventures and reveal secrets about his toughest cases, at 4 p.m. Aug. 5. Members of the of the local Sherlock Holmes society, Watson's Tin Box, will impersonate Holmes. "Kindergarten, Here We Come!" -- a program of stories and activities to help children entering kindergarten make the transition -- will be offered at 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Aug. 8 and 7 p.m. Aug. 10. Registration is requested.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | December 29, 2006
After her sister's mysterious death and after hearing strange noises in her bedroom at night, Helen Stoner decided she had better hire a detective. Stoner, a character in the Arthur Conan Doyle story The Adventure of the Speckled Band, paid a visit to Sherlock Holmes and told him that she thought her stepfather was trying to kill her. To bring to life the events depicted in The Speckled Band and other Sherlock Holmes tales, members of Watson's Tin...
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 5, 1993
PHOENIX -- It's elementary, my dear Watson. The evidence appears unmistakable: The notorious Professor Moriarty, the sinister genius, scourge of London and nemesis of Sherlock Holmes, can now be unmasked.Moriarty, it seems, was none other than the American astronomer Simon Newcomb, superintendent of the U.S. Nautical Almanac Office and the most celebrated U.S. astronomer of the 19th century. There are so many clear and unmistakable parallels between the two that according to a modern-day sleuth there can no longer be any doubt that they were, in fact, one and the same.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
Meet Matthew John Mosca, a Baltimore paint detective.Bearing microscopes, scalpel, X-acto knives, surgical gloves, magnifying glass, camera, notebooks, sandpaper, mineral oil to resaturate paint, hand-held illuminated magnifier and coin envelopes to hold samples, he enters historic buildings seeking to solve the multilayered mysteries of finish and texture, bronzing powders and white lead, stencils and gold leaf, distemper and linseed oil -- all things paint.Technically,...
NEWS
May 2, 2011
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PAWKY A good Scottish and northern English word, pawk , or "trick," gives us the modern English word pawky , slyly or dryly humorous, or shrewd and witty. Canny , while we're being Scottish, enters into it. It mainly appears in British English, but there is no reason that they should have a monopoly on the good stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010
If you go Little Italy Open Air Film Festival Details: Located at corner of High and Stiles streets on Friday nights. Music starts at 7 p.m.; films screen at 9 p.m. Free. littleitalymd.com. July 2: "Moonstruck" July 9: "Bread and Tulips" July 16: "Tea With Mussolini" July 23: "Big Night" July 30: "It Started in Naples" Aug. 6: "The Italian Job" Aug. 13: "My House in Umbria" Aug. 20: "When in Rome" Aug. 27: "Cinema Paradiso" Flicks From the Hill Details: Takes place at 9 p.m. Thursdays at the American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway.
FEATURES
January 15, 2010
Avatar . ( 3 STARS) $50.3 million $430.1 million 4 weeks Rated : PG-13 Running time : 2:40 What it's about : A paraplegic ex-Marine (Sam Worthington, above) controls the body of an "avatar," a body of a creature on another planet, and gets caught up in a struggle between the humans and the natives. Our take : James Cameron has delivered the most-anticipated blend of live-action and motion-capture animation to date, but the story's simplistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2010
Avatar . $75.6 million $212.7 million 2 weeks Rated PG-13 Running time 2:40 What it's about A paraplegic ex-Marine (Sam Worthington, above) controls the body of an "avatar," a body of a creature on another planet, and gets caught up in a struggle between the humans and the natives. Our take James Cameron has delivered the screen's most-anticipated blend of live-action and motion-capture animation to date, but the story's simplistic.
FEATURES
By Michael Phillips and Michael Phillips,Tribune Newspapers critic | December 25, 2009
Guy Ritchie can make all the superslick, ultragreasy crime movies he wants ("RocknRolla" being the most recent and one of the greasiest), but now he has given us "Sherlock Holmes," and I'm sorry but I like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's characters. I have no fixed notion about how they should be handled, but it's a serious drag to see how Ritchie has turned Holmes and Dr. Watson into a couple of garden-variety thugs. People really want to see this movie. (So did I, despite the director.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | December 20, 2009
FAMILY The Harlem Globetrotters: Check out two of the stars of "The Amazing Race" - Big Easy and Flight Time - as they stop the frantic world travel and come home, to the basketball court at least. The game against the Washington Generals promises amazing dunks and plenty of feats of agility. Shows start at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday at the 1st Mariner Arena. Web: www.baltimorearena.com FILM 'Sherlock Holmes': Sherlock Holmes as a macho man? That's not so elementary, my dear Watson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
To most of the world, Sherlock Holmes is a fictional character, a master of deductive reasoning created by British writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle over the course of 60 novels and short stories. But true Sherlockians, like those who will be gathering at the Pratt Library on Saturday for the 30th year running, know better. "There's a belief on our part that Sherlock Holmes was a real person," says Andrew Solberg, a member of Watson's Tin Box of Ellicott City, one of three Baltimore-area Holmesian societies putting together Saturday's gathering, which will feature talks and discussions by some of the area's leading Holmes authorities.
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