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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Richard Sher, the Baltimore television news anchor now best known as Oprah Winfrey's former co-host, is to step down from WJZ-TV in April after more than 28 years to pursue a new career in commercials and other ventures. "I have been thinking about it for a long time," Sher, 62, said yesterday. "I have wavered on this. ... But I want to try these things." Station officials and Sher separately said his decision to depart is voluntary, and that they asked him to stay full-time. Instead, he said he intends to free-lance for the station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Back in July, I wrote about Gov. Martin O'Malley becoming a staple of network and cable Sunday morning TV. Public affairs show hosts ranging from Bob Schieffer to Candy Crowley talked about the attributes Maryland's governor brings to the national conversation about the nation's civic life. This Sunday, he will do less familiar turn on Baltimore TV sitting down for an interview with Richard Sher on the former WJZ newsman's "Square Off" show. I am interested in hearing what O'Malley has to say when he's speaking to a local audience and isn't riding TV point for President Obama's re-election campaign.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 25, 2008
After 33 years of Baltimore television, Richard Sher says he's finally ready to move on. And this time, he means it. "I had done this a few times before," says Sher, whose announced retirement in 2004 lasted less than a month before he asked station management to take him back. "It was tough each time, but I thought this was the time to really do it." Sher, 67, says he made his decision to retire early this month. Although lean economic times have forced newsrooms throughout the country to cut costs, he insists the decision to leave now was his alone, and that he was not forced out by WJZ management.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Since Baltimore City Hall contended in a federal lawsuit last year that a group of international banks conspired to keep a key interest rate benchmark low, more municipalities and private companies have started to investigate potential losses because of the alleged scheme. Baltimore bankruptcy attorney Joel I. Sher is looking into whether banks' manipulation of Libor, the London interbank offered rate, caused a jumbo mortgage lender, Thornburg Mortgage Inc., to lose money though interest-rate swaps tied to the rate.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
Patricia R. Sher, a former Democratic state legislator who served as deputy majority leader of the House of Delegates and then as a senator from Montgomery County, died yesterday of emphysema at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. She was 70. Mrs. Sher's political activism began in the 1960s, when she worked to repeal "blue laws" that mandated Sunday business closings. She was first elected as a delegate in 1978 and retired from politics in 1995 as a state senator. "She was very, very easy to work with," said former Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel, whose 1970 campaign in Montgomery County was managed by Mrs. Sher.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
Richard Sher wasn't sleeping. Wasn't eating. Wasn't happy. The longtime WJZ anchor and reporter - 28 years and counting - put in his resignation last month and was on track to leave the Baltimore CBS station next month. But he couldn't take the thought of change, he says. It made him ache. And so he's decided to stay on the air at the very same channel. "It was the shortest retirement in broadcast history," Sher says. Sher, by his own description "a very youthful 62," has filled a variety of roles at WJZ, including anchor, reporter and talk show host.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | July 9, 1997
Starting Friday, Channel 11 sports anchor Gerry Sandusky will add the Orioles' pre-game radio talk show on WBAL (1090 AM) to his duties.Sandusky, 35, will not only be host of "Sports Line" before Orioles games, but also will continue to deliver sports reports on Channel 11 during the same time.Greg Sher, who took over as "Sports Line" host in January, will now anchor just the post-game talk show and contribute taped reports to the pre-game show. Sandusky and Sher will split the duties on nights the Orioles aren't playing.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 10, 1997
Though 26 is a tad young to be reaching a career crossroads, Greg Sher, nonetheless, is there after he was demoted this week at WBAL (1090 AM) from pre- and post-game Orioles talk show host to just post-game moderator through the end of the baseball season.Sher; his boss, Jeff Beauchamp; and his replacement, Gerry Sandusky, are publicly calling the switch a chance to bolster the station's Orioles coverage. But one can't help but think this was recognition that Sher's work so far has been considered spotty.
SPORTS
By Mike Frainie and Mike Frainie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2003
When junior forward Alex Sher told her McDonogh friends that she hadn't scored in her two-year varsity soccer career, they told her to think of the opportunity the situation presented. "They told me to be patient, because when I score, it will be a big goal," Sher said. Yesterday, Sher scored 28 seconds into overtime to give host McDonogh a 3-2 victory over top-ranked and previously unbeaten Notre Dame Prep in an Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference game. Brittany Tegeler, the metro area's leading scorer, got both of the Eagles' first two goals and assisted on Sher's game-winner for No. 7 McDonogh (11-5-1, 4-2-1)
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | October 18, 2000
Highly verbal, highly tactile and always in search of his next riff, longtime WJZ reporter Richard Sher is relaxing between bites while sitting on the balcony of the Cross Keys Donna's when he swivels to a young server, touches her on the arm, and asks her age. "Twenty-one," she replies. "Ah," he says, looking back at his dining companion for effect, "so you were minus 4 when I started at 'JZ." Indeed, Monday marked Sher's 25th anniversary at the CBS-owned Channel 13, a lifetime in the high-churn world of television news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Stedman Graham is one self-help author who practices what he preaches almost every day of his life. If he didn't, he would likely be lost in one of the largest and most overwhelming shadows in American life. Graham, known to millions as "Oprah Winfrey's boyfriend," was in town last week promoting his 11th book, "Identity: Your Passport to Success," a guide to creating your own identity rather than letting others define and limit who and what you can imagine yourself being. One of his stops was Richard Sher's "Square Off" show, which airs at 11 a.m. Sunday on WMAR (Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Richard Sher's "Square Off," Baltimore's longest-running public affairs, moves to 11 a.m. Sunday on WMAR-TV's schedule. "We're excited about making the move," says Sher, "because we will no longer be competing with shows like 'Meet the Press' or 'Sunday Morning.' By 11 a.m. those shows are gone, and it's clear sailing for us -- and our audience focused on issues that matter locally. "      
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | September 13, 2009
At 67, TV newsman Richard Sher is still irrepressible. And it is all but impossible not to get caught up in his enthusiasm. The 49-year broadcast veteran came to an interview last week to talk about his reinvention of a one-time Baltimore TV landmark, the long-running public affairs show "Square Off," and he was going to hit a talking point that he wanted to emphasize - over and over, so help him God. Near the end of the conversation, after he had...
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 17, 2009
Laura Lippman was just on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, promoting her new book, Life Sentences. Ferguson asked if she sees much of another famous Baltimorean, John Waters. "Yeah, well, I'll tell the story because it was outed in the newspaper," she said. "We tried to keep it secret. John Waters was my minister. He married us." "Us" being Lippman and Wire creator David Simon. Ferguson needed a moment to get over his shock, but it's true: The Pope of Trash is a man of the cloth, ordained by the Universal Life Church, an outfit that sells minister's licenses by mail order.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
R ichard Sher, who announced his departure from WJZ this week after 33 years of reporting and anchoring, says he isn't completely done with the news biz. I'm not sure he was ever completely in it. Among the "many accomplishments" listed on his new Web site, www.richardsher.tv: "talking a suicidal man off a ledge at the University of Maryland Medical Center; negotiating for more than 10 hours with a hostage taker, eventually arranging for the safe release of the man's hostage; and receiving the first civilian lifesaving award ever presented by the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, for helping a man suffering from a heart attack find his way to an emergency room, all the while giving the man nitro glycerin and driving the man's car."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | December 11, 1990
PharmaKinetics Laboratories Inc. was awarded some relief yesterday from the financial pressures that forced it into bankruptcy, as the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore allowed the company to make use of accounts receivable in the normal course of business.Joel I. Sher, a bankruptcy lawyer retained by the pharmaceutical-testing and consulting company, said the receivables -- money owed to PharmaKinetics for work completed -- had earlier been termed by the court as cash collateral and therefore not available for the company's use.If all of the receivables are collected, Mr. Sher said, it will total $8 million to $10 million.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Laura Vozzella and Lorraine Mirabella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Bibelot, the homegrown bookstore chain that became a neighborhood hangout and forum for local authors, is shutting its doors nearly six years after it emerged on a retail scene dominated by bigger, national stores. The Baltimore area's largest independent book and music seller filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Friday in Baltimore. It plans to close its four stores and lay off an estimated 100 employees within three months. "It's a real loss for the independent book-selling world," said Avin Mark Domnitz, chief executive officer of the American Booksellers Association in Tarrytown, N.Y. Bibelot, known for showcasing Maryland authors and luring shoppers with entertainment, comfortable lounges and Donna's restaurants, had expanded even as dominant chains Barnes & Noble and Borders Group Inc. forced hundreds of independent chains out of business.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 25, 2008
After 33 years of Baltimore television, Richard Sher says he's finally ready to move on. And this time, he means it. "I had done this a few times before," says Sher, whose announced retirement in 2004 lasted less than a month before he asked station management to take him back. "It was tough each time, but I thought this was the time to really do it." Sher, 67, says he made his decision to retire early this month. Although lean economic times have forced newsrooms throughout the country to cut costs, he insists the decision to leave now was his alone, and that he was not forced out by WJZ management.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Outside a mega-movie theater at the White Marsh mall, people are whispering and staring at the man with white frizzy hair. "You on Channel 13?" a young man asks as he takes a break from sweeping up litter. "What's your name?" It's Richard Sher, former anchor and longtime reporter at Baltimore's WJZ-TV, and he is just emerging on this warm July night from a special screening of Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy. Starring Saturday Night Live alum Will Ferrell, the movie, which opens today, spoofs television news in the 1970s.
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