Advertisement
HomeCollectionsShenandoah Valley
IN THE NEWS

Shenandoah Valley

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrew D. Faith and Andrew D. Faith,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Of the many threads of history woven into the battle of Cedar Creek, one of the most unusual and least susceptible to re-enactment is the role of Confederate Col. John Singleton Mosby's Partisan Rangers.Mosby's Rangers, formally the 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion, do not appear as combatants at Cedar Creek or in the Shenandoah Valley battles leading up to that engagement - Lynchburg, Kernstown, Opequon or Fishers Hill - for although they were active in the valley, they were not part of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's command.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
On Monday morning, friends of Dmitry Volkov, the talented cellist who died unexpectedly in Baltimore on May 10 at the age of 26, gathered at the Peabody Institute, where he recently earned an artist's diploma. Among those deeply affected by the loss of this promising musician is Daniel Heifetz, president and founder of Heifetz International Music Institute in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov was artist in residence. On Wednesday, Mr. Heifetz will accompany the body of the cellist back to his parents in Russia.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By Story and photos by Sarah Clayton and Story and photos by Sarah Clayton,Special to the Sun | October 15, 2000
"I get to go home a little bit each day," says Rosa Kesterson, her accent still richly German despite 39 years in this country. She is standing in front of a 17th-century timber-framed German peasant farmhouse, one of four farmsteads -- German, Irish, English and American -- at the Frontier Culture Museum, a 220-acre living- history museum in Staunton, Va., where noise from the nearby interstate intrudes only until the magic of the museum takes over....
NEWS
January 28, 2014
Your recent article on hydraulic fracturing stopped me in my tracks ("Furor over fracking in Va. forest," Jan. 26). I spent my undergraduate days at Bridgewater College in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. One of the highlights was the resplendent beauty of George Washington National Forest and the breathtaking view from atop Reddish Knob. The idea that one of nature's gifts is to be sacrificed to the promoters and opportunists of high-volume hydraulic fracking is unconscionable.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Lexington is a handsome little village with good buildings. - Isaac Burr, traveling in Virginia in 1804 The night was dark, the narrow country road deserted. The lights from the few houses along the way looked like distant stars. I'd never been to Clark's Lumber Yard, but I'd heard things got hopping out there on Friday nights. The Saw Mill Band, led by 82-year-old Bruce Clark, started playing at 7:30 p.m., and the dancing started at 7:31. Or so I'd been told. Quite frankly, I couldn't imagine anything "hopping" down this remote road, 15 miles north of Lexington, Va., in rural Rockbridge County, except maybe a frog or two. But then again, the Lexington area can surprise you. Bluegrass and Bach mix comfortably here, and visitors will find a thriving intellectual community in the midst of a gorgeous rural setting.
NEWS
By Robert M. Duff and Robert M. Duff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2004
The winter of 1864 was bleak. According to The Civil War Day by Day: An Almanac 1861-1864, entry for Friday, Jan. 1, 1864, "Extreme cold swept across much of the North and South and temperatures below zero as far south as Memphis, Tenn., and Cairo, Ill., caused much suffering among the soldiers." President Abraham Lincoln's prospects for re-election were dreary. The fourth year of the war was dragging on and increasingly unpopular. Hope of a decisive military victory by the Union was dim and even dimmer for the Confederacy.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Fletcher and Stephanie Fletcher,Special to the Sun | May 16, 1999
The picturesque town of Staunton, Va., is an unlikely place to find a big museum complex.The town of 25,000 souls is nestled in the broad and beautiful Shenandoah Valley, known for its apples and dominated by the time-softened Appalachian Mountains of northwestern Virginia. On the map, Staunton (pronounced, STAN-t'n) is a midsize dot just off Interstate 81. Some motorists opt to stop for a meal or even to spend the night on their way to and from other destinations. But most zip by without discovering the time machine that awaits the curious explorer willing to deviate from the beaten path and visit the Museum of American Frontier Culture, which is located here.
BUSINESS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 1997
They always catch your attention -- those real estate advertisements for river-front chalets, or rustic cabins with heavenly views of the Shenandoah Valley, some with dozens of acres for as little as $47,000.Real estate agents who do business in the mountain areas say they get calls every day from the Baltimore metropolitan area and even as far away as New York and New Jersey.The Shenandoah Valley, just three hours from the Baltimore Beltway via Interstate 70 and Route 340 south, lures dentists, congressmen, attorneys, scientists, secretaries, potters, moms and metro workers.
NEWS
By Michael Perone and Michael Perone,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
In late 1864, Gen. Robert E. Lee, the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, laid the groundwork for the Battle of Cedar Creek by deciding to send Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early and the 2nd Corps from the siege of Petersburg, Va., to the Shenandoah Valley in an effort to distract the Union high command and draw federal forces away from the Confederate heartland.Union Maj. Gen. David Hunter had been operating in the valley, earning the nickname "Black Dave" by burning the property of suspected rebels, even the houses of his own Virginia relatives.
NEWS
By Nick Alexopulos and Nick Alexopulos,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Occupied by the summer heat and a siege at Petersburg, Va., Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant underestimated the importance of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign's role as part of his grand military offensive in 1864. According to Jeffry D. Wert in his 1987 book From Winchester to Cedar Creek: The Shenandoah Campaign of 1864, it was not until late summer that Grant understood "if the summer stalemate in Virginia were to be broken, it would be beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Shenandoah Valley."
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
Philadelphia International Flower Show With a theme based on the islands of Hawaii, this year's International Flower Show brings a taste of the tropics to Philadelphia. White sand, palm trees and hula dancers all have a role as the show, sponsored by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Scoiety, salutes "Hawaii: Islands of Aloha. " Visitors can see a 25-foot waterfall, a beach wedding, floral volcanoes, surf shacks and traditional Hawaiian crops like pineapple and sugar cane. There's also a tribute to Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire and floral-arranging competitions modeled after the "Iron Chef" TV show.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
KINSALE, Va. - "Smells like detritus!" hollers Justin Powers, 17, as our kayak flotilla noses into a salt marsh where the Yeocomico and Potomac rivers meet near the Chesapeake. It is good that Justin and his 15 colleagues from Turner Ashby High School, in the far-off Shenandoah Valley farming country, know the odor of organic matter decaying from tidal marshes - vital fuel for the web of life in the Chesapeake. Making the connections between farmland and bay waters has never been more pressing.
TRAVEL
May 15, 2005
AN APPETITE FOR KEEPING THE EARTH GREEN Leave it to food-loving San Francisco to come up with more than 100 taste-tempting ways to help the environment. That's the number of restaurants participating in the many events in the city from June 1 to June 5 to observe U.N. World Environment Day. Though the day is honored across the world every June 5, the United Nations selects one city to be the host for the main celebration. San Francisco, the 2005 host, is the first city in the United States selected since the event began in 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2005
Eats Lulu's has a carefully edited menu featuring American bar favorites, but with much attention given to the details, so green beans are tender-crisp, pot stickers are crammed with savory filling and tortilla chips are still hot from frying. page 14 PICK OF THE WEEK What: Performance by New York power trio GrooveLily, as well as Paul and Storm of DaVinci's Notebook. Where: Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. When: Saturday night at 8 Why: Because part of the proceeds benefits the group 5th Element, which promotes "constructive thinking and artistic expression within the Baltimore City Public Schools."
NEWS
By Christine DelliBovi and Christine DelliBovi,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The second Battle at Kernstown took place on July 24, 1864, a critical year in the war for the Shenandoah Valley. The balance was tipping toward the Union forces, and the South was losing control of its former stronghold. The Union forces wanted to crush the Confederate opposition, and the Southern soldiers were determined to keep this strategically important area under their power. The first major defeat of the federal troops in the Shenandoah Valley was at New Market on May 15. After this Confederate victory, the Union soldiers rebounded by burning the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington.
NEWS
By Meaghan C. Ginnetty and Meaghan C. Ginnetty,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
Ranked as one of the two largest battles fought in the Shenandoah Valley, the Battle of Cedar Creek was the last major battle of Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's 1864 Valley Campaign. The fighting began at dawn on Oct. 19, 1864, when the Confederate Army, under the command of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, carried out one of the most daring and successful surprise attacks of the war. According to Dan Reigle and the Cincinnati Civil War Round Table, Early had two concerns when he entered into battle: to hold Sheridan's forces in the Shenandoah Valley and to strike a blow where possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2005
Eats Lulu's has a carefully edited menu featuring American bar favorites, but with much attention given to the details, so green beans are tender-crisp, pot stickers are crammed with savory filling and tortilla chips are still hot from frying. page 14 PICK OF THE WEEK What: Performance by New York power trio GrooveLily, as well as Paul and Storm of DaVinci's Notebook. Where: Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. When: Saturday night at 8 Why: Because part of the proceeds benefits the group 5th Element, which promotes "constructive thinking and artistic expression within the Baltimore City Public Schools."
NEWS
By Christine DelliBovi and Christine DelliBovi,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
The second Battle at Kernstown took place on July 24, 1864, a critical year in the war for the Shenandoah Valley. The balance was tipping toward the Union forces, and the South was losing control of its former stronghold. The Union forces wanted to crush the Confederate opposition, and the Southern soldiers were determined to keep this strategically important area under their power. The first major defeat of the federal troops in the Shenandoah Valley was at New Market on May 15. After this Confederate victory, the Union soldiers rebounded by burning the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2004
Lexington is a handsome little village with good buildings. - Isaac Burr, traveling in Virginia in 1804 The night was dark, the narrow country road deserted. The lights from the few houses along the way looked like distant stars. I'd never been to Clark's Lumber Yard, but I'd heard things got hopping out there on Friday nights. The Saw Mill Band, led by 82-year-old Bruce Clark, started playing at 7:30 p.m., and the dancing started at 7:31. Or so I'd been told. Quite frankly, I couldn't imagine anything "hopping" down this remote road, 15 miles north of Lexington, Va., in rural Rockbridge County, except maybe a frog or two. But then again, the Lexington area can surprise you. Bluegrass and Bach mix comfortably here, and visitors will find a thriving intellectual community in the midst of a gorgeous rural setting.
NEWS
By Robert M. Duff and Robert M. Duff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 2004
The winter of 1864 was bleak. According to The Civil War Day by Day: An Almanac 1861-1864, entry for Friday, Jan. 1, 1864, "Extreme cold swept across much of the North and South and temperatures below zero as far south as Memphis, Tenn., and Cairo, Ill., caused much suffering among the soldiers." President Abraham Lincoln's prospects for re-election were dreary. The fourth year of the war was dragging on and increasingly unpopular. Hope of a decisive military victory by the Union was dim and even dimmer for the Confederacy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.