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Shenandoah National Park

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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service and the state of Virginia have broken a seven-state ring of poachers and smugglers who have been slaughtering black bears and illegally harvesting ginseng root to sell to Asian markets for use as aphrodisiacs and medicine. The three-year undercover investigation, code-named Viper, centered on rural Elkton, Va., and nearby Shenandoah National Park. To lure the poachers, agents opened a sporting goods store in Elkton, where they met with hunters and poachers trafficking in bear parts and the rare plant, which is an endangered species.
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NEWS
December 27, 2013
Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act; astute, visionary legislation that's served as our nation's lifeline for plants, fish, and wildlife on the brink of extinction. The act has since become one of the strongest and most important laws we have for protecting and restoring the native species of our continent. Thanks to Endangered Species Act, Americans can delight in the sight of bald eagle soaring over the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, hear the howls of wolves in Yellowstone National Park and witness the magnificent breeching of a humpback whale off the coast of California.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
LURAY, Va. -- The scientists in Shenandoah National Park look at the landslides, the washed-out roads, the tangled trees left by last month's violent floods -- the kind of flood that happens maybe once every 1,000 years -- and don't see destruction.They look at the ravaged landscape and call it "change.""It's not a sense of tragedy," said Bob Krumenaker, unit leader of the park's Center for Resources. "It's a sense of awe."We find it very exciting."In late June, rains hovered over central Virginia and soaked the region.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedy | August 8, 2012
Since I was a kid, I've spent a lot of time in the woods. My family has camped in state and national parks along the East Coast from Maine to Florida, and I've even hiked relatively short portions of the Appalachian Trail in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Trout fishing is something I enjoy immensely and it's an endeavor that obliges those who are serious about its practice to spend a fair amount of time in fairly remote territories. Pine needles, beach sand and leaves have served as comfortable cushions under my sleeping bags; roots, pine cones and rocks have made for unpleasant sleeping experiences.
NEWS
By Jessica Clarke and Jessica Clarke,DAILY NEWS-RECORD | October 6, 2002
LURAY, Va. - The mile-long lane that leads to Darwin Lambert's heart passes through his lifeblood. The narrow, pitted dirt road, running under the green, velvety sheen of the Blue Ridge Mountains, meanders by fields with orange and lavender wildflowers, the rocky Dry Run and a dense forest edged with ferns. A fitting introduction to the home of a longtime naturalist, whose unpublished autobiography is titled Earth, Sweet Earth. A clearing in the woods reveals the cabin in Shaver Hollow where Lambert and his wife, Eileen, have lived since 1964.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- Rich Ashburn enjoys the solitude of hiking and camping along the Appalachian Trail, but as he left yesterday morning on a four-day jaunt, he made a few changes in his routine.He decided to head north into Maryland from Harpers Ferry, instead of south toward the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, as he originally planned. He will camp near other people. And he is packing a can of Mace.Ashburn's anxiety was shared by many hikers along the Appalachian Trail after two women were found slain in their tent June 1 in the backwoods of Shenandoah National Park, their throats slashed.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez Reporters Sheridan Lyons and David Michael Ettlin of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 7, 1990
Our flag was still there yesterday, flying high over Fort McHenry, but you couldn't get inside to see it.Like dozens of other non-essential federal operations -- museums, parks and memorials -- Fort McHenry was closed to the public, a cash-short victim of the government's budget impasse.At midnight Friday, with no money budgeted for routine operations, all non-essential functions of the federal government stopped, including visitor services at the place that inspired the national anthem.One tourist who drove from Michigan arrived at the star-shaped fort to find, like everyone else who showed up yesterday, the gates locked and a sign stating: "Park Closed."
NEWS
By John T. Starr | August 26, 1991
MY FAMILY used to spend a week or two every summer in Shenandoah National Park or its immediate vicinity. We stayed at Skyland, just off Skyline Drive in the park, or at a farm in a small pocket valley west of Swift Run Gap.Our days were filled with walking the trails in the park, climbing Stony Man and Hawksbill mountains, descending to Dark Hollow and Whiteoak falls and looking for deer and other wildlife. Some days we would drive the length of the Skyline Drive, down to where it joins the Blue Ridge Parkway.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2002
BIG MEADOWS, Va. - John and Stephanie Young have some advice for travelers to Shenandoah National Park: If you want a great view, get a postcard. After battling eight hours in traffic to get here from Middletown, Conn., the Youngs were eager to take in a majestic vista from an overlook in the Blue Ridge Mountains. But as they stared across a hazy expanse, they got nothing of the sort. "We were expecting blue skies," Stephanie grumbled. "We got gray smog." Beyond the perch where the Youngs stood on their recent family vacation lies a panorama that, when the park was created in 1926, was said to offer views of 100 miles all around.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedy | August 8, 2012
Since I was a kid, I've spent a lot of time in the woods. My family has camped in state and national parks along the East Coast from Maine to Florida, and I've even hiked relatively short portions of the Appalachian Trail in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Trout fishing is something I enjoy immensely and it's an endeavor that obliges those who are serious about its practice to spend a fair amount of time in fairly remote territories. Pine needles, beach sand and leaves have served as comfortable cushions under my sleeping bags; roots, pine cones and rocks have made for unpleasant sleeping experiences.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - The National Park Service and the state of Virginia have broken a seven-state ring of poachers and smugglers who have been slaughtering black bears and illegally harvesting ginseng root to sell to Asian markets for use as aphrodisiacs and medicine. The three-year undercover investigation, code-named Viper, centered on rural Elkton, Va., and nearby Shenandoah National Park. To lure the poachers, agents opened a sporting goods store in Elkton, where they met with hunters and poachers trafficking in bear parts and the rare plant, which is an endangered species.
NEWS
By Jessica Clarke and Jessica Clarke,DAILY NEWS-RECORD | October 6, 2002
LURAY, Va. - The mile-long lane that leads to Darwin Lambert's heart passes through his lifeblood. The narrow, pitted dirt road, running under the green, velvety sheen of the Blue Ridge Mountains, meanders by fields with orange and lavender wildflowers, the rocky Dry Run and a dense forest edged with ferns. A fitting introduction to the home of a longtime naturalist, whose unpublished autobiography is titled Earth, Sweet Earth. A clearing in the woods reveals the cabin in Shaver Hollow where Lambert and his wife, Eileen, have lived since 1964.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2002
BIG MEADOWS, Va. - John and Stephanie Young have some advice for travelers to Shenandoah National Park: If you want a great view, get a postcard. After battling eight hours in traffic to get here from Middletown, Conn., the Youngs were eager to take in a majestic vista from an overlook in the Blue Ridge Mountains. But as they stared across a hazy expanse, they got nothing of the sort. "We were expecting blue skies," Stephanie grumbled. "We got gray smog." Beyond the perch where the Youngs stood on their recent family vacation lies a panorama that, when the park was created in 1926, was said to offer views of 100 miles all around.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
BIG MEADOWS, Va. -- Old-timers may remember such Depression-era terms as "Hoover blankets," "Hoover flags" and "Hoovervilles" or "Hoover camps."They were named for President Herbert C. Hoover, who was blamed for the unemployment and poverty caused by the Depression. "Hoover blankets" were old newspapers the homeless used to keep warm. The flags were empty pockets turned inside out. The 'villes and camps were shantytowns built by the unemployed.The Hoover camp hidden in the Blue Ridge Mountain woods here, however, was no village of tar-paper shacks.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- Rich Ashburn enjoys the solitude of hiking and camping along the Appalachian Trail, but as he left yesterday morning on a four-day jaunt, he made a few changes in his routine.He decided to head north into Maryland from Harpers Ferry, instead of south toward the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, as he originally planned. He will camp near other people. And he is packing a can of Mace.Ashburn's anxiety was shared by many hikers along the Appalachian Trail after two women were found slain in their tent June 1 in the backwoods of Shenandoah National Park, their throats slashed.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
LURAY, Va. -- The scientists in Shenandoah National Park look at the landslides, the washed-out roads, the tangled trees left by last month's violent floods -- the kind of flood that happens maybe once every 1,000 years -- and don't see destruction.They look at the ravaged landscape and call it "change.""It's not a sense of tragedy," said Bob Krumenaker, unit leader of the park's Center for Resources. "It's a sense of awe."We find it very exciting."In late June, rains hovered over central Virginia and soaked the region.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
Forty years ago this month, Congress passed the Endangered Species Act; astute, visionary legislation that's served as our nation's lifeline for plants, fish, and wildlife on the brink of extinction. The act has since become one of the strongest and most important laws we have for protecting and restoring the native species of our continent. Thanks to Endangered Species Act, Americans can delight in the sight of bald eagle soaring over the rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, hear the howls of wolves in Yellowstone National Park and witness the magnificent breeching of a humpback whale off the coast of California.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
With fall foliage bursting out all over, people are heading to the woods to soak up the colorful atmosphere. Some of them are also shoveling dirt, lifting logs and carting trash.Ted Sanderson, a past president of the Mountain Club of Maryland, helps coordinate regular maintenance activities on the Appalachian Trail, one of the state's premier hiking attractions. Mr. Sanderson and a group of volunteers plan to perform a season-end project today, building steps on an eroded trail slope near Boiling Springs, Pa., in the portion of the historic trail that is the responsibility of the 58-year-old Baltimore-based hiking club.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | October 17, 1992
With fall foliage bursting out all over, people are heading to the woods to soak up the colorful atmosphere. Some of them are also shoveling dirt, lifting logs and carting trash.Ted Sanderson, a past president of the Mountain Club of Maryland, helps coordinate regular maintenance activities on the Appalachian Trail, one of the state's premier hiking attractions. Mr. Sanderson and a group of volunteers plan to perform a season-end project today, building steps on an eroded trail slope near Boiling Springs, Pa., in the portion of the historic trail that is the responsibility of the 58-year-old Baltimore-based hiking club.
NEWS
By John T. Starr | August 26, 1991
MY FAMILY used to spend a week or two every summer in Shenandoah National Park or its immediate vicinity. We stayed at Skyland, just off Skyline Drive in the park, or at a farm in a small pocket valley west of Swift Run Gap.Our days were filled with walking the trails in the park, climbing Stony Man and Hawksbill mountains, descending to Dark Hollow and Whiteoak falls and looking for deer and other wildlife. Some days we would drive the length of the Skyline Drive, down to where it joins the Blue Ridge Parkway.
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