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Sports Digest | June 12, 2013
College lacrosse Calvert Hall grad Kruger leaves post as Shenandoah coach Shenandoah announced that Mike Kruger (Calvert Hall) has resigned as men's lacrosse coach. Kruger, who led the Hornets to five wins this season - matching the win total of the previous three seasons combined - is resigning to accept a professional opportunity in NCAA Division I men's lacrosse. Kruger came to Shenandoah after two years as an assistant at Washington and Lee. "This is great for Mike," athletic director Doug Zipp said.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Major League Lacrosse midfielder Paul Rabil (Johns Hopkins) has torn abdominal and adductor (hip) muscles and will have surgery early next month, Lacrosse Magazine reported on its website. Rabil, who last weekend finished a season with the Boston Cannons in which he was named team MVP, tweeted Wednesday morning: "Lots of rehab/maintenance mixed with lifting and arc trainer...never been excited to do surgery and start the rehabilitation process. 9/4/13. " By having the procedure done Sept.
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FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 25, 1991
The Towsontowne Dinner Theater is currently doing ''Shenandoah,'' a musical that is most timely, dealing, as it does, with war. The war in this instance, is the Civil War, and the musical, one that began as a film in 1965 (James Stewart starred), is initially anti-war then pro.The leading character is a Virginia farmer who doesn't want any of his six sons to enter the war. He insists it is not his affair. ''I don't own slaves,'' he says.In time, the war comes to him, and when it does, he and his sons join the fight.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 12, 2013
College lacrosse Calvert Hall grad Kruger leaves post as Shenandoah coach Shenandoah announced that Mike Kruger (Calvert Hall) has resigned as men's lacrosse coach. Kruger, who led the Hornets to five wins this season - matching the win total of the previous three seasons combined - is resigning to accept a professional opportunity in NCAA Division I men's lacrosse. Kruger came to Shenandoah after two years as an assistant at Washington and Lee. "This is great for Mike," athletic director Doug Zipp said.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | January 29, 1993
Shenandoah singer Marty Raybon was thrilled when he met then-rookie Troy Aikman backstage after a concert at Billy Bob's Texas in Fort Worth in 1989. After all, the deeply religious Floridian had been a Dallas Cowboys fan since the [team's] clean-cut era of Landry and Staubach.He expected to maybe take a picture with the pigskin-tosser and run into him sporadically at charity events. But instead, Mr. Aikman and the band ended up talking for almost an hour about country music. It turned out that Mr. Aikman was not just some celeb with time to kill, but a dyed-in-the-wool Shenandoah fan."
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 28, 2006
Producing Shenandoah at Ford's Theatre in Washington sounded like a good idea for several reasons. The show is set during the Civil War, and Ford's is a major landmark of that era. In addition, when this 1975 anti-war musical debuted, the country was still reeling from Vietnam; three decades later, the nation is at loggerheads over our involvement in another foreign conflict. Finally, this revival is directed by Jeff Calhoun, whose Deaf West production of Big River - set just before the Civil War - was one of the finest shows this critic has ever seen at Ford's.
SPORTS
By From staff reports | December 1, 2006
The College of Notre Dame gave up a double-digit second-half lead against the visiting Shenandoah women's basketball team in a 59-53 loss. The Gators (2-1) took a 37-29 lead with 13:37 remaining, but the Hornets (3-1) responded with a 24-12 run and got in front for good with 5:32 remaining. Alexis Hargbol led all players with 20 points and 14 rebounds off the bench for Shenandoah. The Hornets held a 50-39 rebounding advantage as Notre Dame was out-rebounded for the first time this season.
NEWS
By Paula Crouch Thrasher and Paula Crouch Thrasher,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 1998
In the Shenandoah Valley, Va. - After visiting endless Civil War museums, battlefields and memorials, you figure you've seen all there is to see of Lt. Gen. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson.You've already beheld his burial place, a separate grave for his amputated left arm, his prayer book, a scrap of his gray Confederate uniform, even his razor. But then, halfway through a tour of the Virginia Military Institute Museum in Lexington, you come across the general's horse.It's Little Sorrel, all right - stuffed, of course - standing proudly in a battlefield diorama, saddled and poised to bear his master into yet another skirmish.
NEWS
By Christine DelliBovi and Christine DelliBovi,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
To some, the town of New Market, in the middle of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, might seem an unlikely place for a Civil War battle. But 140 years ago, its residents were put in the forefront of the South's struggle against the Union forces. Today, New Market is a place where the past and present continue to blend. The name New Market comes from a town in England of the same name, the location of a famous racetrack. New Market had its own racetrack during its founding years, traces of which can still be seen, according to Arthur L. Hildreth's 1964 study, A Brief History of New Market and Vicinity.
TRAVEL
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and By Robin Tunnicliff Reid,Special to the Sun | August 12, 2001
The commercial caverns of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley may not be J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth or C.S. Lewis' Deep Realm. But, with a little imagination, it's easy to conjure up those mysterious worlds where wicked goblins hold court in torch-lit caverns, dragons sleep atop mounds of treasure and dour gnomes row ships across a vast underground sea. Easy enough, that is, until the scrawny teen-ager who's also touring the cave proudly (and loudly)...
NEWS
By Photos by David Hobby and Photos by David Hobby,Sun photographer | July 9, 2007
A rich example of the country's historical preservation is Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, tucked between the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers. The scenic area borders Maryland, West Virginia and Virginia, and draws history buffs and outdoor enthusiasts. Activities include hiking trails such as the C&O Canal and the Appalachian, and tours of museums, exhibits and battlefields. The park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. except on major holidays.
SPORTS
By From staff reports | December 1, 2006
The College of Notre Dame gave up a double-digit second-half lead against the visiting Shenandoah women's basketball team in a 59-53 loss. The Gators (2-1) took a 37-29 lead with 13:37 remaining, but the Hornets (3-1) responded with a 24-12 run and got in front for good with 5:32 remaining. Alexis Hargbol led all players with 20 points and 14 rebounds off the bench for Shenandoah. The Hornets held a 50-39 rebounding advantage as Notre Dame was out-rebounded for the first time this season.
NEWS
July 19, 2006
Drum and Bugle contest -- Shenandoah Sound Drum and Bugle Corps will present Sounds of the South at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Anne Arundel Community College, 101 College Pkwy., Arnold. This is a drum-and-bugle competition to benefit band programs of Glen Burnie and Arundel high schools, the Arundel Instrumental Music Association and the Chesapeake Argonauts Drum and Bugle Corps. This contest will host bands of children of all ages from several states. The cost is $10 in advance, and $12 at the gate.
NEWS
May 5, 2006
JANET R. IMKE, of Greenbackville, VA died May 3, 2006. She was the wife of Robert D. Imke, her husband of 54 years. Born December 12, 1930 in Gettysburg, PA, she was the daughter of the late M.P. Rhodes and the late Bessie Starner Rhodes. Janet was a graduate of Shenandoah University. She was a vocal music teacher and also worked in the retail industry. In addition to her husband, David, she is survived by a daughter, Debra Mc Aulay of Hanover, PA. There will be no memorial services following cremation.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 28, 2006
Producing Shenandoah at Ford's Theatre in Washington sounded like a good idea for several reasons. The show is set during the Civil War, and Ford's is a major landmark of that era. In addition, when this 1975 anti-war musical debuted, the country was still reeling from Vietnam; three decades later, the nation is at loggerheads over our involvement in another foreign conflict. Finally, this revival is directed by Jeff Calhoun, whose Deaf West production of Big River - set just before the Civil War - was one of the finest shows this critic has ever seen at Ford's.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 12, 2006
Freshman Tom Dooley scored three times and the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team was held to three goals over the first 58 minutes as 18th-ranked Hofstra upset the No. 8 Blue Jays, 11-6, yesterday at James M. Shuart Stadium in Hempstead, N.Y. Athan Iannucci finished with two goals and an assist for the Pride (2-1). Kevin Huntley led Hopkins (2-2) with three goals. Hofstra scored the first three goals in the game on the way to a 4-1 lead after one period. The Blue Jays got on the board with 3:01 to play in the first as Kevin Huntley scored a man-up goal, off a pass from Drew Dabrowski.
NEWS
October 10, 1999
The following special dispatch of the New York World gives a graphic account of the great battle fought on Wednesday last in the Shenandoah Valley:[Special Dispatch to the New York World.]Full Account of the Battle -- Our Forces at First Surprised -- Subsequent Victory -- Splendid Conduct of the Soldiers -- What has been Gained by the Victory.Headquarters Army of the Shenandoah, October 19 -- via Washington, Oct. 20. -- Another sanguinary battle -- the fortunes of which were in the beginning, apparently adverse, but the results of which are quite as encouraging as those of any which has preceded it in the Valley -- has consumed the entire day, from dawn to nightfall.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 1, 2004
Redshirt junior Kamillo Rosenthal hit two free throws with 55 seconds left to help Frostburg State to a 75-73 win over Shenandoah last night at Bobcat Arena. The Bobcats (2-2) held a 72-63 lead with 4:29 to play before the Hornets (3-1) stormed back with a 10-0 run to take a one-point edge with 1:03 left. Shenandoah senior Chris Rhone hit the final basket of the spurt but was whistled for a technical foul on the way back down the court. Rosenthal's free throws gave the Bobcats a 74-73 lead and the Frostburg State defense held the Hornets' scoreless for the final 24 seconds.
NEWS
November 3, 2005
Doris C. Carpenter, a homemaker and former substitute teacher, died of complications from a stroke Sunday at Sinai Hospital. The Woodbine resident was 85. Born Doris Claire Koontz in Atlanta, she was raised in Shenandoah, Va. She earned a bachelor's degree in education from what was then Madison College, now James Madison University, in Harrisonburg, Va., in 1939. Mrs. Carpenter taught elementary school in Virginia for several years, and from 1947 to 1952, was an FBI file clerk in Washington, Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
KINSALE, Va. - "Smells like detritus!" hollers Justin Powers, 17, as our kayak flotilla noses into a salt marsh where the Yeocomico and Potomac rivers meet near the Chesapeake. It is good that Justin and his 15 colleagues from Turner Ashby High School, in the far-off Shenandoah Valley farming country, know the odor of organic matter decaying from tidal marshes - vital fuel for the web of life in the Chesapeake. Making the connections between farmland and bay waters has never been more pressing.
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