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June 17, 2011
Editor: The Welcome One Emergency Shelter in Belcamp operated by Faith Communities and Civic Agencies United (FCCAU) continues to provide excellent services for Harford County's homeless population. Even faced with reduced funding, our exceptional donor base and dedicated staff have demonstrated relentless diligence and compassion in caring for some of our county's most vulnerable citizens. During 2010, the Welcome One Emergency Shelter became a temporary home to 202 homeless men and women.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Alaric I. "Al" Phillips, a counselor who was an outreach and volunteer coordinator for a Baltimore men's shelter, died of a heart attack Sept. 2 at his West Ostend Street home. He was 52. The son of Jesse James Phillips, a Secret Service agent and private investigator, and Geraldine Phillips, a Howard County public school educator, Alaric Ivan Phillips was born in Columbia, S.C. He was raised in Germany, where his father was serving as an Army staff sergeant, and later moved with his family to Washington and Columbia.
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EXPLORE
August 30, 2011
Editor: I would like to publicly thank the Bel Air Barnes & Noble bookstore for their role in recovering from hurricane Irene. I am writing this message on my mobile device from inside their store Sunday afternoon. I am using their free Wi-Fi service and one of their electrical outlets. And, for over an hour there were six others near me doing the same thing. Nearly every outlet in the store had somebody plugged in with a notebook, tablet, or a phone. So, thank you Barnes & Noble for supporting the wireless users of Bel Air during the power outage.
NEWS
ByJoe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Officials at an animal rescue center in Harwood said Friday they are housing the feral cat that last week prompted closure of Richard Henry Lee Elmentary School in Glen Burnie. Anne Arundel County school officials had spotted the cat last Friday and, after failing to capture it, closed the school over concerns that students might be bitten or scratched. The cat was finally caught Sept. 2 by county animal control officials. On Friday, officials from Rude Ranch Animal Rescue in Harwood, a volunteer-based nonprofit, said animal rescue had brought the feline to its facility.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
Five men say they have been banned from the city's homeless shelter after a fight broke out Saturday evening, prompting concerns from legal advocates about the shelter's protocol for barring the homeless from the $8 million facility. The shelter's manager said that at least a dozen intoxicated men had attacked staffers Saturday night and police arrested two after witnessing them strike employees. "Anyone that physically assaults a client or staff member is permanently barred from our shelter," said shelter manager Linda Trotter.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
We are looking to open vacant government buildings to shelter illegal immigrants but we won't open them up for our own homeless citizens ( "Immigrant children's center eyed for city ," June 10). Am I missing something here? Wayne Kirschnick, Annapolis Junction - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
EXPLORE
Letter to the Aegis | January 17, 2012
To the Editor: I don't understand what people have against the Humane Society, and what they do for the discarded animals that nobody wanted. What would they like folks to do for them other than try to find them good homes? This is in regard to the article in Wednesday Jan. 4, and the Rebels dog park. People from all over come go use this park because it's safe. It's grass, not dirt and mud. It is fenced, and everyone seems to have a great time...owners and dogs. There aren't many places folks can take their dogs that is basically worry free.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff says he opposes a proposal to shelter immigrant children at a Catholic Charities facility in his district. "I have been getting calls from constituents with concerns," he said Saturday. "We have enough issues and problems in our own backyard here, and we don't need to take on other people's problems. " Catholic Charities announced last week that it wants to care for 50 children fleeing violence in Central America. The agency would shelter them at St. Vincent's Villa in Timonium, but still must submit an application to federal officials by Aug. 5. "Catholic Charities does phenomenal work," said Huff, a Lutherville Republican.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Midnight and Noir scampered to their feet like orphans eager to find new homes. But with Halloween approaching, these black cats might find it difficult to be sprung any time soon from the Maryland SPCA's Baltimore shelter.That's because the tenders of the city's castaway pets are out to protect their feline wards from being hurt in a teen-ager's holiday prank -- or maybe even in a satanic cult's ritual."As horrible as this may sound, cats are tortured around Halloween time," said Deborah Thomas, executive director of the Maryland SPCA, which for years has enforced a virtual moratorium on black cat adoptions in the days before Halloween.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | February 7, 2010
The hundreds of thousands of Haitians who now are living in flimsy shelters that they have pieced together from scraps of rubble, plastic and bedsheets may count at least one blessing: It's the dry season. Little precipitation has fallen on the beleaguered Caribbean nation since the earthquake Jan. 12 leveled the capital. But the rains are coming, and with them, mud, misery and water-borne disease. For shelter experts struggling to move as many earthquake survivors as possible into better housing before the start of the rainy season in April, it's a race against time.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Republican members of the House of Delegates are asking Gov. Martin O'Malley how Maryland will deal with the children coming to the state in the wave of unaccompanied minors from Central America entering the United States illegally. In a letter Tuesday to O'Malley, the House GOP caucus asked several questions, including how many immigrant children are expected, how they will be sheltered, what public services they will need and how much it will cost. Republicans urged the governor to brief General Assembly members on the state's response.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The sixth annual Orioles Pet Calendar benefitting the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) will go on sale August 12, and five players will be on-hand to sign calendars at the shelter that day. J.J. Hardy, Tommy Hunter, David Lough, Bud Norris, and Matt Wieters will visit BARCS from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on August 12 to sign calendars bought that day. Those attending must buy their calendars on-site for autographs. There will be free parking at Lot D on the south side of M&T Bank Stadium.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Hundreds of homeless pets will be the real winners in the Baltimore Humane Society's Raffle of Champions, which ends this Wednesday. For $10, anyone can purchase a raffle ticket and the chance to win Baltimore Ravens season tickets. All proceeds from the raffle go to the care of the animals at the Humane Society's no-kill shelter in Reisterstown, which receives no government funding. The grand prize is a pair of Baltimore Ravens season tickets. First prize is a tailgate grill; second prize is an autographed photo of Jacoby Jones; and there are five third-place mystery prizes to be won. Raffle tickets can be purchased online at bhs.raffleready.com/raffle-of-champions-2014 .
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff says he opposes a proposal to shelter immigrant children at a Catholic Charities facility in his district. "I have been getting calls from constituents with concerns," he said Saturday. "We have enough issues and problems in our own backyard here, and we don't need to take on other people's problems. " Catholic Charities announced last week that it wants to care for 50 children fleeing violence in Central America. The agency would shelter them at St. Vincent's Villa in Timonium, but still must submit an application to federal officials by Aug. 5. "Catholic Charities does phenomenal work," said Huff, a Lutherville Republican.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
State and local officials are working with federal authorities to identify a shelter in Maryland for Central American children crossing the U.S. border after at least four potential sites fell through, including one that was opposed by Gov. Martin O'Malley. Aides to O'Malley said Wednesday that the state and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services are considering a new facility in Maryland, but officials declined to say where it is or how many children it could hold. Baltimore officials said they are also open to housing some of the children.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
A vandal painted the words "No illeagles here," on a Carroll County building that had been under consideration as a temporary shelter for undocumented immigrant children. "No undocumented Democrats," continued the message painted on Westminster's former Army Reserve Center. While the graffiti provoked online banter about sick birds of prey, the Maryland State Police took the incident seriously. The Carroll County Times reports that the state police are investigating the graffiti as a hate crime due to its ethnic implications.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Ulysses Aiken, a native Annapolitan, found himself homeless after losing his job as a professional boxing trainer. He ended up at the Light House Homeless Prevention and Support Center — Anne Arundel County's only shelter open to adults and children year round. There for four months earlier this year, Aiken, 54, called his stay "a nightmare" and said he was kicked out of the shelter without cause. Aiken says he is one of eight former residents who have filed complaints with the county Human Relations Commission in recent weeks, alleging that a senior staff member bullied and harassed residents.
EXPLORE
February 8, 2012
In light of recent news articles pertaining to homelessness in Harford County, Harford Mall management is partnering with the Welcome One Emergency Shelter in a collection and donation drive to benefit the shelter. The collection drive, called Have a Heart for Harford's Homeless, is taking place until Feb. 29. The goal of the Have a Heart for Harford's Homeless campaign is to collect needed items from the Welcome One wish list, as well as monetary donations. Donations for the shelter can be placed in the display area at Harford Mall's center court. Mall representatives will be on hand throughout the donation period to accept monetary donations to the shelter.  "This is a wonderful opportunity for the mall to provide some much needed assistance to our neighbors in Harford County," Harford Mall General Manager Lauri Altman said in a news release. "It is one small way that we as a community can give back to those who need it. " The kickoff for Harford Mall's campaign was last Friday afternoon in the mall's center court.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
The federal government will run out of money to deal with the influx of Central American children crossing the U.S. border illegally this summer if lawmakers fail to approve $3.7 billion in emergency funds, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson told a Senate panel Thursday. Meanwhile, federal officials planned to assess a former Army Reserve site in Westminster as a possible shelter for some of the children, according to a document obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The Obama administration has considered - and rejected - three other sites in Maryland.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Baltimore County plans to shorten shelter stays, increase outreach to people on the streets and expand job-seeking help under a 10-year plan to reduce homelessness. Helping people find a path to self-sufficiency was the focus as county officials and advocates unveiled the long-term plan Thursday. They want to break stereotypes, too. "We have to educate our county residents that homelessness isn't the guy panhandling on the street," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said. Kamenetz described being shocked after hearing a few years ago from a man he grew up with.
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