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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 20, 2006
From cheesecake pinups to unrepentant harpies to zaftig grandmothers, Shelley Winters played them all, in a career that spanned more than a half century. In her later years, Winters, who died Saturday at 85, had become more of a personality than an actress: better known for pouring ice on an unrepentantly chauvinistic Oliver Reed during a 1972 Tonight Show appearance than for winning two Oscars or for teaching at the famed Actor's Studio. Two tell-all autobiographies, published in 1980 (Shelley)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 12, 2006
When a character in Poseidon announces he isn't called "Lucky" for nothing, you just know he'll be pulped in seconds. Audiences snort when he comes to an abrupt and mangled end. They're trying to signal that it's time to retire "luck" as a gimmick from pop culture. As the poor man's version of destiny, "luck" has been overused so long it's lost any magical charm or even the tang of cheap irony. On the lighter side, Just My Luck, the new Lindsay Lohan romance, follows a chic Manhattanite whose good fortune ends when she kisses a bad-luck boy at a masquerade party.
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By CLAUDIA LUTHER and CLAUDIA LUTHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died yesterday. She was 85. Ms. Winters, the first actress to win two Oscars in the best supporting category, died of heart failure at the Rehabilitation Centre of Beverly Hills, her publicist Dale Olson announced. She was hospitalized in October after suffering a heart attack. Although most sources give her birth date as Aug. 18, 1922, she told Variety's Army Archerd in 2004 that she had lied to studio head Harry Cohn when she signed with Columbia and was born two years earlier.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 20, 2006
From cheesecake pinups to unrepentant harpies to zaftig grandmothers, Shelley Winters played them all, in a career that spanned more than a half century. In her later years, Winters, who died Saturday at 85, had become more of a personality than an actress: better known for pouring ice on an unrepentantly chauvinistic Oliver Reed during a 1972 Tonight Show appearance than for winning two Oscars or for teaching at the famed Actor's Studio. Two tell-all autobiographies, published in 1980 (Shelley)
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By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half,'' shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero exec produces, writes and directs this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail."The Linguini Incident," shooting in New York and Los Angeles. Rosanna Arquette heads an eccentric cast (David Bowie, Marlee Matlin and Shelley Winters) in an equally quirky scenario. Arquette is a waitress, with aspirations as an escape artist, who deals with life, stress and unusual characters in the big city.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
NATIONAL General extends Iraq tour Gen. George W. Casey Jr. is extending his assignment as the top allied commander in Iraq to a third year, senior Pentagon officials said late Friday, ensuring that the U.S. military-diplomatic team there remains in place well into 2007. pg 3a Actress Shelley Winters dies Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died yesterday. She was 85. pg 6a WORLD Pakistan challenges U.S. attack Pakistan's government demanded an explanation yesterday for a U.S. airstrike on a remote village that Pakistani officials said killed a number of women and children.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
Disasters, real and imagined, are in the spotlight today. This is not television for the weak of heart.* "Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- A holiday disaster more reminiscent of "Pulp Fiction" than the pilgrims unfolds when D. J.'s teacher gives her students free rein over the annual Thanksgiving pageant. ABC.* "Tales of the Serengeti" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Good news for lions, disastrous news for zebras in this first of a four-part series chronicling life in Tanzania's Serengeti National Park in East Africa.
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November 25, 2002
With the cooperation of wife Nancy and children Patti, Ron and Michael, the documentary Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered looks at personal aspects of the 40th president along with his public career. Others interviewed include top officials from the Reagan era, including James Baker, George Shultz and Casper Weinberger. The program airs tonight at 9 on the History Channel. At a glance Primetime: Special Edition (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJLA, Channel 7) -- In an episode called "Trapped," the news show takes on a Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook bent, examining how fast a building can fill with smoke and how to escape, how to get out of a submerged vehicledown and submerged and how to get out of a locked car trunk, among others.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 12, 2006
When a character in Poseidon announces he isn't called "Lucky" for nothing, you just know he'll be pulped in seconds. Audiences snort when he comes to an abrupt and mangled end. They're trying to signal that it's time to retire "luck" as a gimmick from pop culture. As the poor man's version of destiny, "luck" has been overused so long it's lost any magical charm or even the tang of cheap irony. On the lighter side, Just My Luck, the new Lindsay Lohan romance, follows a chic Manhattanite whose good fortune ends when she kisses a bad-luck boy at a masquerade party.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 12, 1995
In his new film, Pauly Shore takes the old jury-room classic "12 Angry Men" and reconfigures it as "One Stupid Guy."The last thing that "Jury Duty" is about is any concept of duty; rather it's about self-indulgence blown out to epic proportions with the utterly incidental result of virtue triumphing.Shore plays Tommy Collins, an infantile character who lives in a trailer with his bloated, strident mother (Shelley Winters) in a state of pathetic dependency. When the notification comes to jury duty, he tosses it out -- that is, until Mom announces that she and her fiance are getting married and taking the trailer to Vegas for an unspecified time.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
NATIONAL General extends Iraq tour Gen. George W. Casey Jr. is extending his assignment as the top allied commander in Iraq to a third year, senior Pentagon officials said late Friday, ensuring that the U.S. military-diplomatic team there remains in place well into 2007. pg 3a Actress Shelley Winters dies Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died yesterday. She was 85. pg 6a WORLD Pakistan challenges U.S. attack Pakistan's government demanded an explanation yesterday for a U.S. airstrike on a remote village that Pakistani officials said killed a number of women and children.
NEWS
By CLAUDIA LUTHER and CLAUDIA LUTHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Shelley Winters, a blond bombshell of the 1940s who evolved into a character actress best remembered for her roles as victims, shrews and matrons, died yesterday. She was 85. Ms. Winters, the first actress to win two Oscars in the best supporting category, died of heart failure at the Rehabilitation Centre of Beverly Hills, her publicist Dale Olson announced. She was hospitalized in October after suffering a heart attack. Although most sources give her birth date as Aug. 18, 1922, she told Variety's Army Archerd in 2004 that she had lied to studio head Harry Cohn when she signed with Columbia and was born two years earlier.
FEATURES
November 25, 2002
With the cooperation of wife Nancy and children Patti, Ron and Michael, the documentary Ronald Reagan: A Legacy Remembered looks at personal aspects of the 40th president along with his public career. Others interviewed include top officials from the Reagan era, including James Baker, George Shultz and Casper Weinberger. The program airs tonight at 9 on the History Channel. At a glance Primetime: Special Edition (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJLA, Channel 7) -- In an episode called "Trapped," the news show takes on a Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook bent, examining how fast a building can fill with smoke and how to escape, how to get out of a submerged vehicledown and submerged and how to get out of a locked car trunk, among others.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1995
Disasters, real and imagined, are in the spotlight today. This is not television for the weak of heart.* "Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- A holiday disaster more reminiscent of "Pulp Fiction" than the pilgrims unfolds when D. J.'s teacher gives her students free rein over the annual Thanksgiving pageant. ABC.* "Tales of the Serengeti" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Good news for lions, disastrous news for zebras in this first of a four-part series chronicling life in Tanzania's Serengeti National Park in East Africa.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 12, 1995
In his new film, Pauly Shore takes the old jury-room classic "12 Angry Men" and reconfigures it as "One Stupid Guy."The last thing that "Jury Duty" is about is any concept of duty; rather it's about self-indulgence blown out to epic proportions with the utterly incidental result of virtue triumphing.Shore plays Tommy Collins, an infantile character who lives in a trailer with his bloated, strident mother (Shelley Winters) in a state of pathetic dependency. When the notification comes to jury duty, he tosses it out -- that is, until Mom announces that she and her fiance are getting married and taking the trailer to Vegas for an unspecified time.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 9, 1992
DOCTOR Harold J. Liverworth, world-famous expert, makes some startling confessions in his newest book, "Stop My Head Before It Talks Again.""It was greed and vanity that made me a talking head," his book begins. Before conquering these vices, the doctor was talking on as many as eight television shows every Sunday.Worse, he began nursing homicidal fantasies involving competitive talking heads like Sam Donaldson and George Will of David Brinkley's Sunday show and Bob Novak, the famous all-purpose talking head.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 9, 1992
DOCTOR Harold J. Liverworth, world-famous expert, makes some startling confessions in his newest book, "Stop My Head Before It Talks Again.""It was greed and vanity that made me a talking head," his book begins. Before conquering these vices, the doctor was talking on as many as eight television shows every Sunday.Worse, he began nursing homicidal fantasies involving competitive talking heads like Sam Donaldson and George Will of David Brinkley's Sunday show and Bob Novak, the famous all-purpose talking head.
NEWS
December 17, 2004
Poetry group holding holiday party Sunday The International Poetry Forum will hold a holiday party at 2 p.m. Sunday at the home of Frank and Judy Crowson, 3844 Mount Airy Drive. The meeting will include a potluck feast. The monthly event features guest poets, networking, book signings, refreshments, and an open forum for sharing new works by all participants. Listeners are welcome. Information: 410-641-6845. County Arts Council showing `Pete's Dragon' The Carroll County Arts Council will show the classic children's film Pete's Dragon at 2 p.m. Dec. 28 at the Carroll Arts Center in downtown Westminster.
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By Los Angeles Times | December 28, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half,'' shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero exec produces, writes and directs this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail."The Linguini Incident," shooting in New York and Los Angeles. Rosanna Arquette heads an eccentric cast (David Bowie, Marlee Matlin and Shelley Winters) in an equally quirky scenario. Arquette is a waitress, with aspirations as an escape artist, who deals with life, stress and unusual characters in the big city.
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