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Baltimore Crime Beat | February 22, 2012
Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein was among the prosecutors urging lawmakers to allow prosecutors to seek shorter sentences in some marijuana possession cases , WBAL Radio reported this week. Bernstein was in Annapolis Tuesday to testify before the House Judiciary Committee which was considering a bill to allow prosecutors to pursue a maximum 90-day jail term for those convicted of possessing less than 14-grams of marijuana.  Current law calls for a maximum one-year jail term.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Baltimore County police believe they have identified the man who videotaped himself urinating on former Baltimore Ravens owner Art Modell's grave, and prosecutors are reviewing the case with charges possible early next week. Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said Saturday that his office got the police report late Thursday and prosecutors will examine it after the weekend. "We will take a look and see if any laws were violated," Shellenberger said. A man with the username "BrownsFan4Life" posted a video of the incident on YouTube last week.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger said Wednesday he will request an outside prosecutor to handle the case of County Councilman Todd Huff, who was arrested last weekend on charges of driving under the influence. "We think this is appropriate to avoid any appearance of impropriety, since the County Council, which obviously includes Mr. Huff, controls the state's attorney budget," Shellenberger said. "We have done this in the past with similar cases, and we think it is prudent that we have an outside prosecutor handle this case from start to finish.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
A week after a Baltimore County police cadet was accused of stealing drugs from the department's evidence room, prosecutors said they had dropped charges against a defendant in a case in which some of the drugs were seized. The trial of 50-year-old Joseph Thorn was scheduled to begin Thursday in Baltimore County District Court. But with the case seven years old and the drugs now missing, State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said, "we decided the most reasonable thing to do was to dismiss the case.
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Elizabeth Ann Shellenberger, who operated a Hamilton pharmacy with her husband, died Saturday of leukemia complications at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Parkville resident was 72. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Biddle Street, Elizabeth Ann Dempsey was a graduate of St. John the Evangelist Parochial School. In 1953, she married John H. Shellenberger, who owned and operated Walther Pharmacy at Hamilton and Frankford avenues. She worked alongside him until 1978, when they sold the business.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
John H. Shellenberger, a former pharmacist who owned a popular Hamilton drugstore, died Thursday of heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 69 and lived in Parkville.Mr. Shellenberger, who retired because of illness in August, had been a part-time pharmacist at Kmart.The Hamilton native was a 1948 graduate of City College and earned his bachelor's degree in 1953 from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. He began working that year at Walther Pharmacy at Hamilton and Frankford avenues.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | January 30, 2006
Scott D. Shellenberger has won millions of dollars for people stricken with cancer and other diseases after their exposure to toxic chemicals. His successful lawsuits have brought a measure of peace to their families. He has even represented a few Orioles players in minor criminal cases. But to get his heart pounding and the stories really flowing, just ask him about his time as a prosecutor in the Baltimore County state's attorney's office. "I loved the work. It's corny, but I really enjoy putting bad guys in jail," he said recently.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
Facing criticism over his salary, Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger said he plans to meet with state lawmakers to discuss possible changes to the law that determines how much he is paid. Shellenberger, a Democrat who took office in January, is scheduled to make about $190,000 this year - slightly more than the final salary of his predecessor, Sandra A. O'Connor. At issue is whether Shellenberger's pay should be calculated based on how much O'Connor earned after three decades in office, or whether he should be paid the lower amount that Circuit Court judges make - as some interpret state law. The law ties the state's attorney's pay to the judges' salaries, plus 5 percent annual increases.
NEWS
June 16, 2008
About 6,000 Baltimore County students came home from the last week of middle school with an opportunity to pin the county state's attorney to the wall. But please, allow us to do that for the rest of you. Scott D. Shellenberger spent $23,000 on the glossy anti-drug calendars that feature prominently the name Scott D. Shellenberger on the cover and on every month of the year. Add the one-page don't-do-drugs message from the state's attorney and that's 14 credits to Scott D. Shellenberger (not counting the photograph and caption on Page 2)
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | January 3, 2007
Scott D. Shellenberger was a first-year law student, working as a stockboy and clerk at Kmart, when Baltimore County State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor offered him a job as a law clerk 25 years ago. Yesterday, the former prosecutor and veteran litigator took the oath of office to replace his former boss, who retired last week after 32 years as the county's top prosecutor. Shellenberger, 47, received a standing ovation from the staff of more than 50 prosecutors who gathered for a swearing-in ceremony at 8 a.m. yesterday at the Circuit Courthouse in Towson.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger filed this week to run for reelection as the county's top prosecutor in 2014. Shellenberger, 54, a Democrat, was elected in 2006, following longtime county State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor, a Republican. He won a contested re-election in 2010. This past year, he was among the most vocal advocates in an unsuccessful effort to fight repeal of the state's death penalty. Shellenberger was hired in the county in 1982, serving as a law clerk and prosecutor before joining the law firm of Peter G. Angelos for 13 years.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Like many of the criminals they chase, the top prosecutors in Baltimore and Baltimore County are regularly hauled before judges, not to answer for their misdeeds, but to make wiretap applications. In Baltimore, investigators asked for as many as 32 wiretaps or renewals in the past two years; in the county, 14. Each authorization is good for a month and can cover multiple phone lines. Under Maryland law, a local government's top prosecutor must be present for a judge to sign off on a wire, so the schedules of Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger and Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein offer a glimpse into the frequency of the investigative technique.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger said Wednesday he will request an outside prosecutor to handle the case of County Councilman Todd Huff, who was arrested last weekend on charges of driving under the influence. "We think this is appropriate to avoid any appearance of impropriety, since the County Council, which obviously includes Mr. Huff, controls the state's attorney budget," Shellenberger said. "We have done this in the past with similar cases, and we think it is prudent that we have an outside prosecutor handle this case from start to finish.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A Baltimore County police officer was indicted Wednesday in the death of a Randallstown teen, but the charges drew criticism from the boy's mother and the community, who continued calls for an outside investigation. James D. Laboard, a nine-year veteran, faces charges of voluntary and involuntary manslaughter in the asphyxiation death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, whom police said he chased after a group of teens threw a rock at his front door on June 13. Each count carries a maximum of 10 years in prison.
NEWS
Baltimore Crime Beat | February 22, 2012
Baltimore City State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein was among the prosecutors urging lawmakers to allow prosecutors to seek shorter sentences in some marijuana possession cases , WBAL Radio reported this week. Bernstein was in Annapolis Tuesday to testify before the House Judiciary Committee which was considering a bill to allow prosecutors to pursue a maximum 90-day jail term for those convicted of possessing less than 14-grams of marijuana.  Current law calls for a maximum one-year jail term.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
I read with great interest Dan Rodricks' commentary of "Taking politics out of parole" (Jan. 29). In his 600-word essay, only once did Mr. Rodricks make a passing mention of the most important word in the criminal justice system — "victim. " Only once did the commentary use the word "punishment," which is one of the fundamental goals for imposing a criminal sentence and thus, making our communities safer. I view the need for the governor to sign off on the parole of a "lifer" not as putting politics in the parole system but as a way of making sure that the person who makes the weighty decision of when a lifer is released is a person directly accountable to the citizens of this state.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger filed this week to run for reelection as the county's top prosecutor in 2014. Shellenberger, 54, a Democrat, was elected in 2006, following longtime county State's Attorney Sandra A. O'Connor, a Republican. He won a contested re-election in 2010. This past year, he was among the most vocal advocates in an unsuccessful effort to fight repeal of the state's death penalty. Shellenberger was hired in the county in 1982, serving as a law clerk and prosecutor before joining the law firm of Peter G. Angelos for 13 years.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | September 3, 2006
One candidate is a personal injury lawyer who earned millions over the years by beckoning prospective clients with TV ads that invited, "Let's talk about it." The other, a former county prosecutor running with the support of his current boss, attorney and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, emphasizes his work experience and describes himself as a "serious guy for a serious job." The two men, Stephen L. Miles and Scott D. Shellenberger, are vying for the Democratic nomination for Baltimore County state's attorney -- a job for which there has not been a contested election in more than two decades.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
In the race for Baltimore County state's attorney, a rematch of the 2006 contest between Scott D. Shellenberger and Stephen Bailey, law-and-order issues have taken a back seat to accusations of wasteful spending. Shellenberger, a first-term Democrat, is promoting his accomplishments, which include carrying out a policy to record inmates' phone calls and prosecuting the state's first fetal homicide case. He is also playing up his role in the county's record-low crime statistics. Bailey, his Republican opponent, agrees that for the most part Shellenberger has done a good job as state's attorney, and he wants to expand some of his initiatives.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
A 21-year-old woman was charged Monday with attempted first-degree murder after Baltimore County police reported that she threw her newborn baby out of a second-story window. Rebecca Diane Himes, who later told a doctor that she had not known she was pregnant before she delivered the child, was also charged with child abuse and reckless endangerment in connection with the July 22 incident at her home on Virginia Avenue in Reisterstown. The full-term baby girl, who appeared to have been born only seconds before she was discovered crying in a bush outside the house, was unhurt.
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