Advertisement
HomeCollectionsShelby Foote
IN THE NEWS

Shelby Foote

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1990
WashingtonThat voice.That courtly, engaging drawl -- Southern to its Mississippi soul, easy as a well-worn armchair. The kind of voice you could listen to forever. The kind of voice that makes you feel all is right in the world.The kind of voice that has turned historian and writer Shelby Foote, the Southern heart of last week's PBS series "The Civil War," into an overnight celebrity at age 73, having enchanted many of the program's 14 million viewers with his rich, colorful stories.The author of a 3,000-page trilogy on that war, Mr. Foote is now being called "Mr. Civil War," the "Carl Sagan of historians."
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Whether his words were spoken or written, no 20th-century storyteller could bring the American Civil War to life like Shelby Foote, the novelist and reluctant television star who died Monday night in Memphis, Tenn., at age 88. As a writer, Mr. Foote spent 20 years, 1954 to 1974, crafting The Civil War: A Narrative, three volumes and 3,000 pages that the Modern Library, in 1999, ranked No. 15 among the century's best English-language works of nonfiction. Though popular, the books did not make Mr. Foote a household name.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
Whether his words were spoken or written, no 20th-century storyteller could bring the American Civil War to life like Shelby Foote, the novelist and reluctant television star who died Monday night in Memphis, Tenn., at age 88. As a writer, Mr. Foote spent 20 years, 1954 to 1974, crafting The Civil War: A Narrative, three volumes and 3,000 pages that the Modern Library, in 1999, ranked No. 15 among the century's best English-language works of nonfiction. Though popular, the books did not make Mr. Foote a household name.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 6, 1991
PBS wants viewers to believe that "Columbus and the Age of Discovery" is a big, big television event.It isn't.The four-part series is one of those public television projects that's more interesting to talk about than to watch.In fact, the seven-hour documentary has more in common with those head-on-the-desk soporific films students must sit through high school history classes than, say, Ken Burns' "The Civil War." Burns' work not only spoke the language of television with great eloquence but actually enriched it. "Columbus" speaks the language of the lecture hall and textbook.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 21, 1991
New York -- We are watching wholesale butchery being committed by Grant and Lee on public television: corpses stacked like winter's woodpiles. Doctors sawing off shattered arms, legs. It is great television. It is the kind of television you get only on public television.Abruptly, the slaughter halts so tireless beggars can tell us so -- "This is the kind of television you get only on public television" -- while browbeating us with demands for money until we sob for mercy."This is the kind of television you get only on public television, you deadbeats," they say, and say, and say, and say. "So make your pledge right now by --"No, they never say "you deadbeats" aloud, but the accusation is thunderous in their warnings that we can easily be deprived of shows like this history of a nation's self-hatred.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 6, 1991
PBS wants viewers to believe that "Columbus and the Age of Discovery" is a big, big television event.It isn't.The four-part series is one of those public television projects that's more interesting to talk about than to watch.In fact, the seven-hour documentary has more in common with those head-on-the-desk soporific films students must sit through high school history classes than, say, Ken Burns' "The Civil War." Burns' work not only spoke the language of television with great eloquence but actually enriched it. "Columbus" speaks the language of the lecture hall and textbook.
NEWS
By Donald R. Morris | October 22, 1990
THE 11-HOUR PBS epic ''Civil War'' rightly fascinated the nation; it represents television at its finest. Save for a spatter of lively comment on black participation, and emancipation's role in Northern motivation, there was little in it controversial -- far less, in fact, than such an accounting might have generated half a century ago.Of particular interest is the fact that 11 hours of engrossing programming was carried in the main by hundreds of black-and-white...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 1990
"The Civil War" is the best non-fiction television since "Eyes on the Prize."It is the Public Television event of the year.It is television to be savored and celebrated.It is to American documentary filmmaking what "The Iliad" was to epic poetry in ancient Greece.And that ain't the half of it. "The Civil War," the 11-hour series which begins at 8 tonight and runs each night through Thursday on MPT (Channel 22 and 67), is that good."The Civil War" is first and last a documentary. If the word "documentary" is a turnoff, stayed tuned anyway.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 8, 1997
Best bet There's no contest for what you should be watching tonight, as MPT begins re-running a nine-part series that constituted some of TV's finest hours."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 14, 1991
Think of it as MTV for Civil War buffs. Think of it as pretty great TV. Think of it as a show you don't want to miss if you are one of the millions who loved Ken Burns' "The Civil War.""Songs of the Civil War," at 7:30 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), is one of the sleepers of the summer. It's a companion piece to Burns' multipart documentary on the war that first aired last fall, and features contemporary pop musicians performing Civil War songs.The musicians include Judy Collins, John Hartford, Sweet Honey in the Rock, Hoyt Axton, Waylon Jennings, Richie Havens, Kathy Mattea, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Ronnie Gilbert and Jay Ungar.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 21, 1991
New York -- We are watching wholesale butchery being committed by Grant and Lee on public television: corpses stacked like winter's woodpiles. Doctors sawing off shattered arms, legs. It is great television. It is the kind of television you get only on public television.Abruptly, the slaughter halts so tireless beggars can tell us so -- "This is the kind of television you get only on public television" -- while browbeating us with demands for money until we sob for mercy."This is the kind of television you get only on public television, you deadbeats," they say, and say, and say, and say. "So make your pledge right now by --"No, they never say "you deadbeats" aloud, but the accusation is thunderous in their warnings that we can easily be deprived of shows like this history of a nation's self-hatred.
NEWS
By Donald R. Morris | October 22, 1990
THE 11-HOUR PBS epic ''Civil War'' rightly fascinated the nation; it represents television at its finest. Save for a spatter of lively comment on black participation, and emancipation's role in Northern motivation, there was little in it controversial -- far less, in fact, than such an accounting might have generated half a century ago.Of particular interest is the fact that 11 hours of engrossing programming was carried in the main by hundreds of black-and-white...
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 3, 1990
WashingtonThat voice.That courtly, engaging drawl -- Southern to its Mississippi soul, easy as a well-worn armchair. The kind of voice you could listen to forever. The kind of voice that makes you feel all is right in the world.The kind of voice that has turned historian and writer Shelby Foote, the Southern heart of last week's PBS series "The Civil War," into an overnight celebrity at age 73, having enchanted many of the program's 14 million viewers with his rich, colorful stories.The author of a 3,000-page trilogy on that war, Mr. Foote is now being called "Mr. Civil War," the "Carl Sagan of historians."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 23, 1990
"The Civil War" is the best non-fiction television since "Eyes on the Prize."It is the Public Television event of the year.It is television to be savored and celebrated.It is to American documentary filmmaking what "The Iliad" was to epic poetry in ancient Greece.And that ain't the half of it. "The Civil War," the 11-hour series which begins at 8 tonight and runs each night through Thursday on MPT (Channel 22 and 67), is that good."The Civil War" is first and last a documentary. If the word "documentary" is a turnoff, stayed tuned anyway.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | October 1, 1990
After taking public television by storm with the recent series on PBS, the Civil War is now cutting a swath through the nation's bookstores.More than 75 stores nationwide already specialize in Civil War books, but now many general bookstores -- including the Doubleday Book Shop on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan -- are adding Civil War sections.One of the fastest-selling books in any category is the companion volume to the television series -- "The Civil War: An Illustrated History" by Geoffrey C. Ward with Ric Burns and Ken Burns, published by Alfred A. Knopf.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill HC | September 20, 1990
Some facts and oddities about the Civil War* Two percent of the country's population, 620,000 people, died in the war, two out of three from disease, not injuries. That is nearly equal to the total number of Americans lost in all other wars the country has fought.* In two days at Shiloh, there were more casualties than in all previous American wars combined.* The number of Union soldiers killed, missing or wounded at Antietam -- 12,401 -- was double the casualties of D-Day. With a total of 23,000 casualties, Antietam was the war's bloodiest day.* The first national paper currency was issued during the Civil War.* A Confederate private named Henry Stanley was captured at Shiloh, survived the war and eventually went to Africa where he found Dr. Livingston.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.