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Sheila Dixon

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NEWS
July 14, 2011
Wednesday's paper contained the good news for fans of Sheila Dixon that she is working with those hoping to unseat Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake ("Dixon at work behind the scenes," July 3). Should any of those candidates prevail, we expect Ms. Dixon would carry considerable influence in city government in the coming years. Will Baltimore voters follow the example of voters in Washington, D.C., who keep returning Marion Barry to office? Alma T., Baltimore
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NEWS
June 12, 2014
I went out of town for a few days, and look what happened. Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake takes a walk to show that it is safe at the Inner Harbor ( "Rawlings-Blake, Batts stroll to show safe harbor," June 4). It appears that her well-intentioned display has caused a firestorm of comments. I count at least eight letters to the editor so far, with all writers making snarky comments about her security patrol. The majority of the letter writers are from the suburbs. Let's take a deep breath, folks, and think this through.
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NEWS
March 12, 2010
Come on now, is it really front page news? Who cares about Shiela Dixon's furs and whether they are for sale on eBay ("2 coats with a notable past go on sale as part of Dixon deal," March 11)? I sure as heck don't. As a retired journalist, I do not feel this item warrants front page coverage and more inside. Shiela Dixon is a disgrace to the city of Baltimore, and it's time the Sun dropped any and all coverage of her. Please! Louis Kordek, Fallston Send letters to the editor to talkback@baltimoresun.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Daniel Patrick Moynihan said famously that everyone is entitled to their own opinions but not their own facts. Such is the case with Brian Griffiths' "City mayors don't focus on city" (Feb. 20), which expresses a range of opinions without any supporting evidence. Mr. Griffiths covers the period between 2000 and today, spanning three mayoral administrations. Yes, Baltimore is far from perfect - too many are without jobs, our city has too much violence, and the scourge of drug addiction destroys too many lives - but living in Baltimore is objectively better today than in 2000.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
I agree with the Sun Magazine 's view that former Baltimore City Mayor Sheila Dixon is a woman who should be watched - watched like a hawk ( "50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). Douglas Kaplan, Baltimore
NEWS
July 16, 2011
I simply want to throw up after hearing about Sheila Dixon's attempt to influence the city's current political scene. What are these people thinking? It makes me lose respect for any candidate who would listen to her. Aren't we concerned about passing on any values of rightness and responsibility to our children? Here is a woman so narcissistic she has yet to deliver a sincere apology or ask forgiveness from those she once served. She really believes she committed no sin other than getting caught, and that her "good deeds" outweigh the bad. Now we have a mayor who is sincere, hard-working, ethical and smart.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
The purloined gift cards. The fur coats. The bicycling tours of the city with staffers.  And, of course, the famous shoe incident. Former mayor Sheila Dixon's tenure in City Hall is ripe with material for comedians.  On Thursday, seven comics and local media personalities will be poking fun of  Dixon -- to her face-- at a "Roast and Toast" at the Baltimore Comedy Factory. Why would Dixon, who resigned in 2010 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges, agree to a such a thing?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 16, 2011
Call me old-fashioned, but I figure the process should be like this: guilt and punishment, followed by disgrace and shame, followed by a period of humility and self-examination, followed by insight and contrition, followed by a public appeal for forgiveness, followed by hard labor in good deeds, then redemption and grace, and maybe someday (if the statutes, stars and voters allow it) re-election. That's my idea of how a corrupt American politician who betrayed the trust of the people who elected her — say, Baltimore's former mayor, Sheila Dixon — might execute a successful political comeback.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon's city pension deal rankled many in 2010 - even sparking a small protest outside City Hall - but she did not get a free pass after being found guilty of embezzlement and perjury charges. To keep her $83,000 a year payout, Dixon had to donate $45,000 to charity, do 500 hours of community service and not seek office. Last week, Dixon was charged with a probation violation after falling almost $14,000 behind on the required payments, according to state records.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 12, 2012
Sheila, Sheila, Sheila ... Girlfriend? You are making us look bad. Ms. Dixon, who resigned as mayor of Baltimore in a plea deal that required her to make $45,000 in donations to charity, is behind - way behind - in her payments, and she's in danger of a probation violation that could cost her a $83,000-a-year pension and perhaps even send her to jail. That would pretty much scuttle her undisguised ambition to return to City Hall. If it is true that a woman has to be twice as good as a man to succeed, it is also true that she has to be twice as clean, and Ms. Dixon was anything but. She was convicted of pocketing $500 in gift cards intended for the poor, but that's hardly the end of her misdeeds.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 20, 2014
It does not take political expertise, a crime fighting background or an economics degree to understand that the city of Baltimore is struggling. As the economic engine for a metropolitan area of 2.7 million people, the continued vitality of the city is an issue of vital importance far outside its limits. Unfortunately for the last 15 years, a succession of mayors who are more interested in grabbing for the brass ring than they are in providing competent leadership for the city they claim to love have ruled Baltimore.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
You cannot begin to imagine how disappointed I was to see former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon not only included in The Sun Magazine special edition "50 Women to Watch," but listed as number eight! Perhaps you might have included her as No. 51 with the caveat that she is a "woman to watch (out for)" following her 2009 conviction of embezzlement for stealing gift cards intended for poor residents! "A misdemeanor conviction" - really ! And, following her conviction she barely avoided prosecution in 2012 on charges of probation violation.
NEWS
August 4, 2013
I was very disappointed to see Sheila Dixon included in your feature of Baltimore women leaders (" 50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). The other women seemed to be people whose lives so far have indicated they will make positive contributions to our city and this region in the future. Ms. Dixon is out of office for good reason. Let us allow her to show why we would want to watch her now and in the days to come. A. Thompson Bell, Baltimore City
NEWS
July 31, 2013
I eagerly sat down to read The Sun magazine feature on Baltimore women leaders ("50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). So imagine my disappointment when I got to No. 8 and saw former mayor Sheila Dixon's name on the list. Actually, disappointment is too tame of word to describe my reaction. To see her profiled amid pillars of the community - women of all ages, ethnic backgrounds and in varied careers - was a disgrace. Ms. Dixon had no place being in the same report with those women and their achievements.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
I agree with the Sun Magazine 's view that former Baltimore City Mayor Sheila Dixon is a woman who should be watched - watched like a hawk ( "50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). Douglas Kaplan, Baltimore
NEWS
July 30, 2013
As I was looking through the latest Sun Magazine and reading "50 women to watch in Baltimore" (July 28), I came across a stunning choice: Sheila Dixon. I was completely upset that a woman who had been convicted on embezzlement and faced perjury charges (but avoided them under a plea agreement) was included in this group of women who are upstanding individuals in the local community. Are our values so skewed that we neglect the fact that this woman was scolded for "leaving office in total disgrace" and that she would "carry a badge of dishonor for the rest of her life" for stealing gift cards earmarked for needy families?
NEWS
July 31, 2013
I eagerly sat down to read The Sun magazine feature on Baltimore women leaders ("50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). So imagine my disappointment when I got to No. 8 and saw former mayor Sheila Dixon's name on the list. Actually, disappointment is too tame of word to describe my reaction. To see her profiled amid pillars of the community - women of all ages, ethnic backgrounds and in varied careers - was a disgrace. Ms. Dixon had no place being in the same report with those women and their achievements.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
Why don't those running down former mayor Sheila Dixon realize that they too may have some hidden sins that may not be as public as hers ("A Dixon comeback?" July 14)? We are the most accusatory people on earth. I understand that those in authority have a greater responsibility to display good character and integrity, and I know she did wrong. But she paid for her crime, and people still aren't satisfied. They want her to keep on paying her debt to society forever. The truth is that Ms. Dixon loved Baltimore, and there has been a great vacuum since she left.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Maybe I took those high school civics classes too seriously, but isn't there something wrong when the running for and holding of political office is indistinguishable from the kind of reality shows that you hate-watch? To wit: the tabloid heaven that is the New York election season. First came Anthony Weiner, the former congressman with the all too Dickensian name, returning from his sexting scandal to run for mayor. As if that wasn't gift enough for the writers of the late-night show monologues, along comes former Gov. Eliot Spitzer escaping his call-girl past to run for comptroller.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
It was sad to see formerly respected Dr. Ben Carson go on television and so thoroughly destroy any credibility he had as a person ("Dr. Ben Carson apologizes, offers to withdraw from Hopkins speech" Mar 29). But it seems to shame and dishonor is a common path followed by so many "conservatives. " Oh well, at least we'll have fond memories of the man - sort of. Now that it looks like his tenure as someone to take seriously is over, maybe he should team up with Sheila Dixon. William Smith, Baltimore
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