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NEWS
May 26, 1991
Girls athletic teams in Carroll County have done well since Title IXmade equal opportunity in sports (and other areas) federal law.Do you think female athletes are treated fairly and equally in the county's high schools? Do they have the same opportunities as boys to participate in sports? If not, what changes should the Board of Education or individual schools make to insure that female athletes have equal opportunity?Please take a few minutes to write down your thoughts on this ballot. Please type or print.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 30, 2006
Sneakers squeaked, shouts echoed and hands flew in the air yesterday as the children - dressed in shirts of maroon, green and various shades of blue - dashed between hoops, hoping for that desired swish that would score points for their teams. It was another Sunday afternoon pickup basketball game - with a twist. The players were a rainbow of colors and backgrounds: children from Baltimore City and suburbia, from public, private and home schools. Children who were white, black, Latino, Korean, biracial, Christian, Muslim and Jewish.
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NEWS
February 3, 1991
The Board of Education, in contract negotiations with the Carroll County Education Association, plans to require all high school physicaleducation teachers hired after July 1991 to coach at least two sports.Do you think the school board should make coaching mandatory for high school phys ed teachers? Do you think physical education trainingautomatically makes those teachers more qualified to coach?Please take a few minutes to write down your thoughts on this ballot. Please type or print. You also are invited to attach additional sheets of paper with more detailed comments on the issue.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG and JOHN EISENBERG,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
It began with instinct, as was often the case with Earl Weaver. "It just seemed to me that some batters hit certain pitchers better than others, and maybe it would be helpful to know those numbers," Weaver said recently. The year was 1968, at the close of Weaver's first season managing the Orioles. The analysis and use of statistical data was still taboo in major league dugouts. Undeterred, Weaver asked Bob Brown, the Orioles' publicity director, if it was possible to ascertain how Orioles hitters fared individually against opposing pitchers, and also how Orioles pitchers fared against opposing hitters.
NEWS
March 31, 1991
Rising costs, fewer state and federal dollars, and falling county revenues have pushed Carroll's deficit over $5 million, spurring immediate cutbacks, reduced work forces and, for the first time, talk of possible layoffs.The Budget Office has directed all county agenciesto cut their budgets by 1 percent for fiscal 1991, which ends June 30, and by 2 percent for fiscal 1992. For the first time in more than a decade, Carroll will experience actual cuts in programs. Where should those cuts be made?
NEWS
August 16, 1992
The county school board recently approved a $6,000 increase in the salary of Superintendent R. Edward Shilling, saying his contract called for it and he deserved it for doing an outstanding job. The board also OK'd a $3,000 annual increase for Deputy Superintendent Brian Lockard, recommended by Mr. Shilling because Mr. Lockard has taken on additional duties.Mr. Shilling's new annual salary is more than $104,000; under the terms of his contract it will rise to $118,000 by July 1994. He also receives substantial benefits and would be paid the entire four-year balance of his salary if he were fired for unsatisfactory performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | August 28, 2003
My mother has destroyed her share of shredders by forcing them to devour too much paper at once, or staples. Meanwhile, my wife is terribly concerned about identity theft. This means that the technology maven in the family is always on the lookout for nearly indestructible shredders. The MD100 Media Destroyer ($130) comes close. Made by Royal Consumer Information Products Inc., the Media Destroyer has been designed to not only take out envelopes with two or three sheets of folded paper but also eat and shred compact discs and 3-inch diskettes - metal and all - for those who want to say goodbye to sensitive information on computer media.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 11, 1990
YOU HEAR a great deal about "power breakfasts," but most people don't know exactly what they are. The power breakfast is the essential meal now consumed by the business community. Without the wheeling and dealing that takes place over orange juice and scrambled eggs, all commerce in this nation would grind to a halt.One of the most powerful places to hold such a breakfast is the Regency Hotel on Park Avenue in New York City. Not long ago, I was waiting for a friend and had an opportunity to observe a power breakfast in play.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 30, 2006
Sneakers squeaked, shouts echoed and hands flew in the air yesterday as the children - dressed in shirts of maroon, green and various shades of blue - dashed between hoops, hoping for that desired swish that would score points for their teams. It was another Sunday afternoon pickup basketball game - with a twist. The players were a rainbow of colors and backgrounds: children from Baltimore City and suburbia, from public, private and home schools. Children who were white, black, Latino, Korean, biracial, Christian, Muslim and Jewish.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
When Gov. William Donald Schaefer and 80 other top officials opened their valentines from Arbutus Middle School students earlier this month, they got a glimpse of the future.The heart-shaped greetings came from the school's technology education class and the youngsters used pink paper they made themselves.Now the students want Mr. Schaefer to see how they made the paper when he opens the two-day National Engineers Week fair at the Baltimore Museum of Industry at 10 a.m. tomorrow.The governor will even be able to take a piece of their handmade paper to the nearby hand-set printing display and order a personal souvenir of his visit made up.The fair will pit teams from schools throughout Maryland in engineering challenges -- among them building robots to retrieve simulated toxic waste containers and testing the endurance of model bridges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | August 28, 2003
My mother has destroyed her share of shredders by forcing them to devour too much paper at once, or staples. Meanwhile, my wife is terribly concerned about identity theft. This means that the technology maven in the family is always on the lookout for nearly indestructible shredders. The MD100 Media Destroyer ($130) comes close. Made by Royal Consumer Information Products Inc., the Media Destroyer has been designed to not only take out envelopes with two or three sheets of folded paper but also eat and shred compact discs and 3-inch diskettes - metal and all - for those who want to say goodbye to sensitive information on computer media.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,sun staff writer | April 23, 2000
QUEENS, N.Y. -- Jyung Mee Park stands in a small gallery at the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center here, explaining her fascination with the push-pull of opposites. Dressed in black jeans and T-shirt with long black hair, the 37-year-old artist herself forms a sort of visual paradox as she stands amid the harsh white of the gallery walls and the rich cream of her monochromatic installation. Tradition/innovation. Durability/temporality. Subtle contradictions find balance in Park's work. From 10,000 sheets of paper, she builds forms of great beauty that seem both featherweight and firmly grounded.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
An Anne Arundel Circuit Court jury was expected to decide today whether Scotland Eugene Williams is guilty of shooting to death two lawyers in their weekend home near Annapolis in May.The jury began deliberating late yesterday afternoon over the fate of Mr. Williams, 31, of Arnold.He is charged with first-degree murder, robbery, burglary, theft and handgun violations in the deaths of Jose E. Trias, 49, and Julie Noel Gilbert, 48, Washington lawyers whose bodies were found May 16 in their home in Winchester on the Severn.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 22, 1992
Whom the gods wish to be foolhardy, they make 14 years old. That was Clem Florio's age on the morning in 1944 when he walked into the smelly New Jersey gymnasium and told the guy with the dented nose that he wished to be a professional boxer."
NEWS
August 16, 1992
The county school board recently approved a $6,000 increase in the salary of Superintendent R. Edward Shilling, saying his contract called for it and he deserved it for doing an outstanding job. The board also OK'd a $3,000 annual increase for Deputy Superintendent Brian Lockard, recommended by Mr. Shilling because Mr. Lockard has taken on additional duties.Mr. Shilling's new annual salary is more than $104,000; under the terms of his contract it will rise to $118,000 by July 1994. He also receives substantial benefits and would be paid the entire four-year balance of his salary if he were fired for unsatisfactory performance.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | February 21, 1992
When Gov. William Donald Schaefer and 80 other top officials opened their valentines from Arbutus Middle School students earlier this month, they got a glimpse of the future.The heart-shaped greetings came from the school's technology education class and the youngsters used pink paper they made themselves.Now the students want Mr. Schaefer to see how they made the paper when he opens the two-day National Engineers Week fair at the Baltimore Museum of Industry at 10 a.m. tomorrow.The governor will even be able to take a piece of their handmade paper to the nearby hand-set printing display and order a personal souvenir of his visit made up.The fair will pit teams from schools throughout Maryland in engineering challenges -- among them building robots to retrieve simulated toxic waste containers and testing the endurance of model bridges.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | August 4, 1991
From the outside, 225 N. Center St. looks like any Colonial revival,late 1970s office building.But inside, it's three stories full of paper, paper, paper.And on all of that paper are, invariably, words.Hundreds, thousands, a sea of them. Sometimes on both sides.Most of those papers cross the desks of the county commissioners at least once.For relative political neophytes Donald I. Dell and Elmer C. Lippy, the crush of bureaucratic wordiness has proved almost suffocating."It's like a blizzard in there," said Lippy, who reads and then signs so many memos, proclamations, orders and resolutions that he has taken to dropping the "Jr."
NEWS
May 26, 1991
Girls athletic teams in Carroll County have done well since Title IXmade equal opportunity in sports (and other areas) federal law.Do you think female athletes are treated fairly and equally in the county's high schools? Do they have the same opportunities as boys to participate in sports? If not, what changes should the Board of Education or individual schools make to insure that female athletes have equal opportunity?Please take a few minutes to write down your thoughts on this ballot. Please type or print.
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