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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | September 13, 1992
Q: I'm interested in lighthouse artwork, models, literature and related items. Are there any lighthouses open to the public in the Chicago area, or any lighthouse exhibitions, books, publications or organizations? Also, are there any lighthouse muralists?A: Lighthouse lovers and collectors will beam upon seeing the "Eyes on the Sea: A Celebration of Lighthouses" exhibit on view through Dec. 31 at the John G. Shedd Aquarium at 1200 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Ill. The exhibit features seven detailed scale models of lighthouses handcrafted by Steven Skinner set against natural-looking surroundings created by Kathryn Field.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
The National Aquarium is set Thursday to unveil its new Conservation Center, established to focus the institution's work in marine conservation and research, and to expand its scope to a national and global stage. In cooperation with scientists at aquariums and universities here and across the country, the center's researchers are already at work tracking contaminants from the BP oil well blowout, and studying threatened eagle rays. "With what's happening to the environment today, with the pressure of human activity, [the board felt]
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2005
Most people say they wash their hands after using the bathroom. But a new study suggests that many of them are not telling the truth. The researchers demonstrated that people were not as conscientious as they say they were by comparing answers given in a telephone poll with observed behavior. In the nationwide poll, conducted Aug. 19-22 by Harris Interactive, 1,013 adults were interviewed about their hand-washing habits. Then the researchers sent observers into public restrooms to see what actually happened.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
When the National Aquarium in Baltimore opened in 1981 as centerpiece of the Inner Harbor's revitalization, it was a bold and risky venture for a city fishing for tourists. The building with neon blue waves and rooftop pyramids made an instant splash - and triggered a wave of aquarium-building nationwide. As Baltimore's aquarium prepares for the Friday opening of "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes," a $74.6 million expansion, it's no longer the urban curiosity it was. Seeking to emulate Baltimore's success, two dozen U.S. cities or states have opened aquariums since 1981, and still others are in the works.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 29, 1993
Outside the placid outdoor pool in San Diego Harbor, where Chicago's Shedd Aquarium's three new dolphins live for now, the first marine mammals captured in U.S. territory since 1989 are stirring already choppy waters.The Pacific whitesided dolphins -- one male and two females -- were taken without incident near Santa Catalina Island Saturday, capping months of skirmishes between the Shedd and animal-rights activists.Despite the protesters' surveillance planes and a makeshift blockade of donated surfboards, kayaks and yachts organized by the producers of the movie "Free Willy," the animals were deposited in their temporary home before the activists knew what happened.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
The National Aquarium is set Thursday to unveil its new Conservation Center, established to focus the institution's work in marine conservation and research, and to expand its scope to a national and global stage. In cooperation with scientists at aquariums and universities here and across the country, the center's researchers are already at work tracking contaminants from the BP oil well blowout, and studying threatened eagle rays. "With what's happening to the environment today, with the pressure of human activity, [the board felt]
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
When the National Aquarium in Baltimore opened in 1981 as centerpiece of the Inner Harbor's revitalization, it was a bold and risky venture for a city fishing for tourists. The building with neon blue waves and rooftop pyramids made an instant splash - and triggered a wave of aquarium-building nationwide. As Baltimore's aquarium prepares for the Friday opening of "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes," a $74.6 million expansion, it's no longer the urban curiosity it was. Seeking to emulate Baltimore's success, two dozen U.S. cities or states have opened aquariums since 1981, and still others are in the works.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
When the National Aquarium in Baltimore opened in 1981 as the centerpiece of the Inner Harbor's revitalization, it was a bold and risky venture for a city fishing for tourists. The building with neon blue waves and rooftop pyramids made an instant splash - and triggered a wave of aquarium-building nationwide. As Baltimore's aquarium prepares for the Friday opening of "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes," a $74.6 million expansion, it's no longer the urban curiosity it was. Seeking to emulate Baltimore's success, two dozen U.S. cities or states have opened aquariums since 1981, and still others are in the works.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
Two harbor seals born at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, and a third raised here after recovering from a 1983 stranding, have been sent to Chicago for the opening of the Shedd Aquarium's new Oceanarium.Doug Messinger, curator of mammals at the Baltimore aquarium, said the two younger seals were born in Baltimore in 1989 and 1990. They are the offspring of a seal orphaned at sea and nursed back to health at the New England Aquarium.The National Aquarium has bred and reared five harbor seals since 1988.
NEWS
March 18, 2008
SAM C. POINTER JR., 73 Judge who forced integration Sam C. Pointer Jr., a retired U.S. District Court judge who had received death threats after his rulings forced school integration in Birmingham, Ala., in the 1970s, died Saturday after suffering from an unspecified illness. He had retired from the court about eight years ago after nearly 30 years on the bench and joined the Birmingham law firm of Lightfoot, Franklin & White. Mr. Pointer issued controversial decisions as Birmingham struggled to desegregate its school systems.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
When the National Aquarium in Baltimore opened in 1981 as the centerpiece of the Inner Harbor's revitalization, it was a bold and risky venture for a city fishing for tourists. The building with neon blue waves and rooftop pyramids made an instant splash - and triggered a wave of aquarium-building nationwide. As Baltimore's aquarium prepares for the Friday opening of "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes," a $74.6 million expansion, it's no longer the urban curiosity it was. Seeking to emulate Baltimore's success, two dozen U.S. cities or states have opened aquariums since 1981, and still others are in the works.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 2005
Most people say they wash their hands after using the bathroom. But a new study suggests that many of them are not telling the truth. The researchers demonstrated that people were not as conscientious as they say they were by comparing answers given in a telephone poll with observed behavior. In the nationwide poll, conducted Aug. 19-22 by Harris Interactive, 1,013 adults were interviewed about their hand-washing habits. Then the researchers sent observers into public restrooms to see what actually happened.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 29, 1993
Outside the placid outdoor pool in San Diego Harbor, where Chicago's Shedd Aquarium's three new dolphins live for now, the first marine mammals captured in U.S. territory since 1989 are stirring already choppy waters.The Pacific whitesided dolphins -- one male and two females -- were taken without incident near Santa Catalina Island Saturday, capping months of skirmishes between the Shedd and animal-rights activists.Despite the protesters' surveillance planes and a makeshift blockade of donated surfboards, kayaks and yachts organized by the producers of the movie "Free Willy," the animals were deposited in their temporary home before the activists knew what happened.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | September 13, 1992
Q: I'm interested in lighthouse artwork, models, literature and related items. Are there any lighthouses open to the public in the Chicago area, or any lighthouse exhibitions, books, publications or organizations? Also, are there any lighthouse muralists?A: Lighthouse lovers and collectors will beam upon seeing the "Eyes on the Sea: A Celebration of Lighthouses" exhibit on view through Dec. 31 at the John G. Shedd Aquarium at 1200 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Ill. The exhibit features seven detailed scale models of lighthouses handcrafted by Steven Skinner set against natural-looking surroundings created by Kathryn Field.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | December 9, 2005
Baltimore's tourism industry is revving up for the opening of the National Aquarium's new Australian pavilion in anticipation of a jump in visitors lured by crocodiles, venomous snakes and a thundering 35-foot waterfall - and its tie-in to a popular cable channel. The $74.6 million addition, "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes," is set to open Dec. 16, immersing visitors in a world that few will see in a lifetime. The hand-carved habitat, intricately painted with pale lichens and scorch marks depicting lightning-sparked fires, will be home to 1,800 individual native animals representing 120 species - including freshwater crocodiles, turtles, fishes, free-flying birds and flying foxes.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The long-raging conflict between Smithsonian Secretary Lawrence Small and the 156-year-old institution's scholars and scientists has been resolved, largely in favor of the scientists. A report prepared by 18 of the nation's leading science experts urged that scientific research at the Smithsonian be strengthened and expanded, rather than curtailed to accommodate fiscal constraints. It warned, however, that the taxpayer-supported Smithsonian is seriously underfunded and needs new revenue sources.
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