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NEWS
September 11, 2002
William F. Sheahan, a retired women's basketball coach, died Saturday when the car he was driving was struck by another vehicle in Salisbury. He was 63 and lived in Gettysburg, Pa. He retired two years ago as women's basketball coach at Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg, where he was involved in the sports program for 17 years. He also ran the Mason-Dixon Basketball Camp at the college and at the Academy of the Holy Cross in Kensington in suburban Washington. Mr. Sheahan was also a New York Life Insurance Co. agent for many years.
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NEWS
September 11, 2002
William F. Sheahan, a retired women's basketball coach, died Saturday when the car he was driving was struck by another vehicle in Salisbury. He was 63 and lived in Gettysburg, Pa. He retired two years ago as women's basketball coach at Mount St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg, where he was involved in the sports program for 17 years. He also ran the Mason-Dixon Basketball Camp at the college and at the Academy of the Holy Cross in Kensington in suburban Washington. Mr. Sheahan was also a New York Life Insurance Co. agent for many years.
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SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Contributing Writer | December 12, 1994
EMMITSBURG -- Bill Sheahan's celebrating will have to wait at least until New Year's Eve.The Mount St. Mary's coach, who was hoping to become the 38th active major-college head coach to reach 300 wins, will have to wait at least until Dec. 31, when his Mountaineers (2-3) take part in the North Carolina-Greensboro Tournament.Loyola's record-setting forward Patty Stoffey played the biggest role in denying Sheahan by scoring a game-high 29 points as the Greyhounds defeated Mount St. Mary's, 78-67, yesterday at Knott Arena.
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2000
Spend some time with Vanessa Blair and her players and it's easy to forget which one is the coach. At 29, the Mount St. Mary's women's basketball coach seems so youthful that she blends right in. But among her peers, she is already beginning to stand out. Selected Northeastern Conference Coach of the Year last season, Blair received the honor in her rookie season at her alma mater. She guided the small college to the regular-season conference championship with an 18-2 record (21-7 overall)
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
For 17 years, Bill Sheahan seemed unstoppable while recording a 372-104 mark as coach of Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team.But a 15-year battle with insulin-dependant diabetes eventually slowed him down, forcing him to retire yesterday.Sheahan, 60, who announced his decision at an afternoon newsconference, coached the Mount to 20 wins in 13 of his seasons there. His best season was a 25-4 campaign in 1993-94 that resulted in a NCAA tournament appearance.But Sheahan said that road trips made it difficult to eat healthy food on a regular schedule, an important factor for people with diabetes.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
EMMITSBURG -- The scene has become monotonous at Mount St. Mary's College.It goes something like this: Women's basketball coach Bill Sheahan and an assistant bring in another strong class of recruits, strip the game down to its essentials during preseason practice, then turn the newcomers loose with veterans to beat up on their competition.Occasionally, the players are big-time performers. Mostly, they are solid players sold on being pieces of a puzzle that produces more than 20 victories.
SPORTS
By Susan Harman and Susan Harman,Special to The Sun | March 17, 1994
IOWA CITY, Iowa -- The Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team had a big enough hill to climb in its first NCAA tournament appearance, playing 13th-ranked Iowa on the Hawkeyes' home court.Then the Mountaineers lost leading scorer and Northeast Conference Player of the Year Susie Rowlyk for all but 3:18 of the first half with foul problems.Iowa didn't need the help, rolling to a 70-47 victory last night. Iowa (21-6) moves on to play Alabama, and the Mount finishes 25-4.But the Mountaineers and coach Bill Sheahan impressed the 4,290 fans at Carver-Hawkeye Arena and Iowa coach Vivian Stringer.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
EMMITSBURG -- Provided her swollen right eye opens sufficiently, Mount St. Mary's center Susie Rowlyk has been cleared to play in the first round of the NCAA Division I women's tournament.Rowlyk, the co-Northeast Conference Player of the Year, visited a specialist yesterday in Lincoln University, Pa., her hometown, and was given the clearance provided she wears some sort of protection.The Mountaineers (24-5) take on host Alabama (20-8) on Thursday night in the East Regional in Tuscaloosa, Ala."
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1996
For Mount St. Mary's guard Amy Langville, missing an NCAA tournament is even more rare than throwing a bad pass or suffering through a prolonged shooting slump. It just doesn't happen.And a victory at home tonight against St. Francis (Pa.) in the Northeast Conference tournament final will ensure that the 5-foot-8 junior's good fortune continues.The top-seeded Mountaineers (21-7) are trying to capture their fourth consecutive NEC championship, and third straight automatic bid into the NCAA tournament.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1998
Sitting casually on the ground yesterday during his break, cell phone flipped open and his back against Planet Hollywood, James Sheahan, 19, seemed not to have a care in the world.In a few hours, limos and limelight, actors and athletes would be descending on the restaurant where he works as a line cook. But Sheahan was unfazed.After all, he had been there, done that.Sheahan was a prep cook and dishwasher at the Planet Hollywood in Seattle when it recently celebrated its grand opening. Seattle, Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
For 17 years, Bill Sheahan seemed unstoppable while recording a 372-104 mark as coach of Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team.But a 15-year battle with insulin-dependant diabetes eventually slowed him down, forcing him to retire yesterday.Sheahan, 60, who announced his decision at an afternoon newsconference, coached the Mount to 20 wins in 13 of his seasons there. His best season was a 25-4 campaign in 1993-94 that resulted in a NCAA tournament appearance.But Sheahan said that road trips made it difficult to eat healthy food on a regular schedule, an important factor for people with diabetes.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1998
Sitting casually on the ground yesterday during his break, cell phone flipped open and his back against Planet Hollywood, James Sheahan, 19, seemed not to have a care in the world.In a few hours, limos and limelight, actors and athletes would be descending on the restaurant where he works as a line cook. But Sheahan was unfazed.After all, he had been there, done that.Sheahan was a prep cook and dishwasher at the Planet Hollywood in Seattle when it recently celebrated its grand opening. Seattle, Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1996
For Mount St. Mary's guard Amy Langville, missing an NCAA tournament is even more rare than throwing a bad pass or suffering through a prolonged shooting slump. It just doesn't happen.And a victory at home tonight against St. Francis (Pa.) in the Northeast Conference tournament final will ensure that the 5-foot-8 junior's good fortune continues.The top-seeded Mountaineers (21-7) are trying to capture their fourth consecutive NEC championship, and third straight automatic bid into the NCAA tournament.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | March 15, 1995
When the Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team plays at No. 13 Alabama tomorrow in the NCAA tournament, it will be in Susie Rowlyk's best interest not to get too excited. But it would seem near impossible for her not to celebrate.With her swollen right eye opening up yesterday, Rowlyk now can play in the first round of the East Regional in Tuscaloosa, Ala., with protective goggles.Although Rowlyk, a 6-foot-2 senior center, is elated at the chance to play again, she knows the consequences of not being able to control her emotions.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
EMMITSBURG -- Provided her swollen right eye opens sufficiently, Mount St. Mary's center Susie Rowlyk has been cleared to play in the first round of the NCAA Division I women's tournament.Rowlyk, the co-Northeast Conference Player of the Year, visited a specialist yesterday in Lincoln University, Pa., her hometown, and was given the clearance provided she wears some sort of protection.The Mountaineers (24-5) take on host Alabama (20-8) on Thursday night in the East Regional in Tuscaloosa, Ala."
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Contributing Writer | December 12, 1994
EMMITSBURG -- Bill Sheahan's celebrating will have to wait at least until New Year's Eve.The Mount St. Mary's coach, who was hoping to become the 38th active major-college head coach to reach 300 wins, will have to wait at least until Dec. 31, when his Mountaineers (2-3) take part in the North Carolina-Greensboro Tournament.Loyola's record-setting forward Patty Stoffey played the biggest role in denying Sheahan by scoring a game-high 29 points as the Greyhounds defeated Mount St. Mary's, 78-67, yesterday at Knott Arena.
SPORTS
By James Giza and James Giza,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2000
Spend some time with Vanessa Blair and her players and it's easy to forget which one is the coach. At 29, the Mount St. Mary's women's basketball coach seems so youthful that she blends right in. But among her peers, she is already beginning to stand out. Selected Northeastern Conference Coach of the Year last season, Blair received the honor in her rookie season at her alma mater. She guided the small college to the regular-season conference championship with an 18-2 record (21-7 overall)
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Contributing Writer | March 15, 1995
When the Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team plays at No. 13 Alabama tomorrow in the NCAA tournament, it will be in Susie Rowlyk's best interest not to get too excited. But it would seem near impossible for her not to celebrate.With her swollen right eye opening up yesterday, Rowlyk now can play in the first round of the East Regional in Tuscaloosa, Ala., with protective goggles.Although Rowlyk, a 6-foot-2 senior center, is elated at the chance to play again, she knows the consequences of not being able to control her emotions.
SPORTS
By Susan Harman and Susan Harman,Special to The Sun | March 17, 1994
IOWA CITY, Iowa -- The Mount St. Mary's women's basketball team had a big enough hill to climb in its first NCAA tournament appearance, playing 13th-ranked Iowa on the Hawkeyes' home court.Then the Mountaineers lost leading scorer and Northeast Conference Player of the Year Susie Rowlyk for all but 3:18 of the first half with foul problems.Iowa didn't need the help, rolling to a 70-47 victory last night. Iowa (21-6) moves on to play Alabama, and the Mount finishes 25-4.But the Mountaineers and coach Bill Sheahan impressed the 4,290 fans at Carver-Hawkeye Arena and Iowa coach Vivian Stringer.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
EMMITSBURG -- The scene has become monotonous at Mount St. Mary's College.It goes something like this: Women's basketball coach Bill Sheahan and an assistant bring in another strong class of recruits, strip the game down to its essentials during preseason practice, then turn the newcomers loose with veterans to beat up on their competition.Occasionally, the players are big-time performers. Mostly, they are solid players sold on being pieces of a puzzle that produces more than 20 victories.
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