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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 16, 1996
NEW YORK -- They look like an unlikely pair -- the Baltimore producer and the New York playwright.The producer, Kathy Levin, is tall, blond and bristling with energy. The playwright, Cynthia Ozick, is short, gray, bespectacled and, as she puts it, "older than Kathy's mother."But they've been working together a long time. After seven years and 18 drafts, "The Shawl," the first play by Ozick -- a distinguished novelist and essayist -- opens off-Broadway at Playhouse 91 on Thursday. And it probably wouldn't have happened without Levin's persistence.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Vivian Haughee draped the bright green prayer shawl over her shoulders and wrapped it around her body. Then she clutched her arms together over the shawl in a warm embrace. Whatever healing powers the knitted garment possessed, they weren't about to escape. "My heart is so full, I feel like crying, not tears of sorrow but tears of joy," said Haughee, 64, after receiving the prayer shawl in her room at Carroll Hospital Center, where she was being treated for fibromyalgia. She was among the first recipients of the hospital's prayer shawl ministry, which was launched by its spiritual care and volunteer services departments in February to offer holistic care.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2004
"I never would have thought that my love for shopping could have such a meaningful impact on someone's life." - Jessica Simpson, on hearing that a shawl she'd worn on her MTV reality show had started a fashion craze for an Argentinian designer.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | January 13, 2008
Three cheers for fashion with a purpose! We're not talking about fanny packs or those plastic rain hats you tie under your chin. We're fans of clothes that have a function, but have the good sense to look stylish, too. That's what drew us to Barbara Press, who, on this day, tossed on a sweater / shawl to keep warm. She liked the way the lightweight cover-up, tied breezily around her shoulders, made her comfortable without being too stuffy. But we like the way it makes her look as classy as she does cozy.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
Remember when Grandma would catch you running out of the house and yell, "Where's your shawl? Put something on those shoulders!" We bet she didn't mean this lovely creation that 17-year-old Ashley Burks found at an accessories boutique on Charles Street. There's nothing precious or "Mary Had a Little Lamb"-ish about this multicolored, adjustable shawl that can be configured to wrap nearly around one's entire body. Teenagers probably wouldn't balk about covering up if the cover-ups looked more like this.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
A fringed black shawl with embroidered pink rose is draped across Kimmie Meissner's lap. A lacy mantilla rests on her shoulders. With the light of the fireplace dancing in her dark eyes, the world champion figure skater looks every bit the young Spanish lady she hopes to portray later this week at the U.S. championships. U.S. Figure Skating Championships Today-Saturday, Spokane, Wash., ESPN2; women's final live, Saturday, 4 p.m., chs. 2, 7
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | January 13, 2008
Three cheers for fashion with a purpose! We're not talking about fanny packs or those plastic rain hats you tie under your chin. We're fans of clothes that have a function, but have the good sense to look stylish, too. That's what drew us to Barbara Press, who, on this day, tossed on a sweater / shawl to keep warm. She liked the way the lightweight cover-up, tied breezily around her shoulders, made her comfortable without being too stuffy. But we like the way it makes her look as classy as she does cozy.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing WriterLos Angeles Times Syndicate | December 19, 1993
My condominium apartment has lots of glass, white-painted walls and off-white carpeting. All this, plus my pale-colored sofa and chairs, makes the living room look just like the North Pole -- only less interesting. As you can probably tell, choosing colors is not my forte, so I wind up buying off-white everything.Take comfort, first of all, in the knowledge that your predicament is not unique. Plenty of people blanch when presented with the need to select something less safe than plain old off-white.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1990
ONCE, LARGE women dressed to be unobtrusive.Happily, things have changed. Large women call themselve"fully fabulous" these days. The plus-sized woman wants you to notice her. She wears bright colors, sensuous fabrics, and loads of eye-catching accessories."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | December 8, 1996
Collars out, cuffs buttonedFashion is not always what you wear, but how you wear it. Even the classic shirt is subject to seasonal styling variations. The way to wear it now is in a retro-disco-gigolo way with the collar open and outside the jacket of a pantsuit. Keep the cuffs buttoned. Drooping and flapping cuffs were last year. From the Isaac Mizrahi designer level to career clothes by INC, it's collars out. Who decides these things? The fashionistas do, just to keep women guessing. What's life like for a cover girl?
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | February 4, 2007
Remember when Grandma would catch you running out of the house and yell, "Where's your shawl? Put something on those shoulders!" We bet she didn't mean this lovely creation that 17-year-old Ashley Burks found at an accessories boutique on Charles Street. There's nothing precious or "Mary Had a Little Lamb"-ish about this multicolored, adjustable shawl that can be configured to wrap nearly around one's entire body. Teenagers probably wouldn't balk about covering up if the cover-ups looked more like this.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
A fringed black shawl with embroidered pink rose is draped across Kimmie Meissner's lap. A lacy mantilla rests on her shoulders. With the light of the fireplace dancing in her dark eyes, the world champion figure skater looks every bit the young Spanish lady she hopes to portray later this week at the U.S. championships. U.S. Figure Skating Championships Today-Saturday, Spokane, Wash., ESPN2; women's final live, Saturday, 4 p.m., chs. 2, 7
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
An 1812 portrait of a sulky Baltimore gentleman - with a teased "spit curl" in his dark hair - seemed a bit out of place next to the camouflage-clad soldiers carrying out their duties one day this week. The no-nonsense, military look of the Medford National Guard Armory has given way to a faintly dreamy, vintage scene bursting with color and mahogany as the Historic Annapolis Antiques Show opens in the main hall today. On Wednesday, about 30 antiques exhibitors from the East Coast and Midwest unpacked and transformed the space as they set up period pieces and prints in their stalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2004
"I never would have thought that my love for shopping could have such a meaningful impact on someone's life." - Jessica Simpson, on hearing that a shawl she'd worn on her MTV reality show had started a fashion craze for an Argentinian designer.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2003
A digital timer on the edge of Janet Whitworth's loom counted down the seconds as she sent a shuttle of wool thread across strings of black, yellow and red. Whitworth, an information systems architect from Alexandria, Va., was watching the clock yesterday morning as she and four teammates competed in a sheep-to-shawl contest. The contest was part of the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival, which is promoted as the largest such event in the country and a key resource for the Maryland sheep and wool industry.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2002
LAST FRIDAY, Elfrida Weberman celebrated her 100th birthday at a grand party held in her honor at Oak Lodge Senior Home in Pasadena, surrounded by family, friends and a host of well-wishers. "I could never imagine that I would be here so long," she said in a voice laced with faint traces of her Estonian heritage. "I am very much lucky." Born Elfrida Mottus on June 22, 1902, she spent her childhood working with her parents, a housekeeper and a miller, on estates in her native Estonia. In 1922, with help from her two sisters who previously had immigrated to the United States, she arrived in New York Harbor.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 2002
LAST FRIDAY, Elfrida Weberman celebrated her 100th birthday at a grand party held in her honor at Oak Lodge Senior Home in Pasadena, surrounded by family, friends and a host of well-wishers. "I could never imagine that I would be here so long," she said in a voice laced with faint traces of her Estonian heritage. "I am very much lucky." Born Elfrida Mottus on June 22, 1902, she spent her childhood working with her parents, a housekeeper and a miller, on estates in her native Estonia. In 1922, with help from her two sisters who previously had immigrated to the United States, she arrived in New York Harbor.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | January 13, 2006
An 1812 portrait of a sulky Baltimore gentleman - with a teased "spit curl" in his dark hair - seemed a bit out of place next to the camouflage-clad soldiers carrying out their duties one day this week. The no-nonsense, military look of the Medford National Guard Armory has given way to a faintly dreamy, vintage scene bursting with color and mahogany as the Historic Annapolis Antiques Show opens in the main hall today. On Wednesday, about 30 antiques exhibitors from the East Coast and Midwest unpacked and transformed the space as they set up period pieces and prints in their stalls.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | December 8, 1996
Collars out, cuffs buttonedFashion is not always what you wear, but how you wear it. Even the classic shirt is subject to seasonal styling variations. The way to wear it now is in a retro-disco-gigolo way with the collar open and outside the jacket of a pantsuit. Keep the cuffs buttoned. Drooping and flapping cuffs were last year. From the Isaac Mizrahi designer level to career clothes by INC, it's collars out. Who decides these things? The fashionistas do, just to keep women guessing. What's life like for a cover girl?
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Erica Jacobs keeps a sacred space behind the fireplace of her Mount Washington home, a narrow room just wide enough for a small loom. On the loom, she weaves tallitot, striped Jewish prayer shawls described in the Book of Numbers.The spot isn't special to Jacobs just because she weaves the garments of her faith there. The very act of weaving is holy for her."I love the feel of fabric, and weaving helps center me; it's the one aspect of my life that's ordered and calm," says the 43-year-old classical violist.
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