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NEWS
April 20, 2011
"Shattuck sees 44 percent increase in package. " This was the headline in The Sun on Saturday, April 16. The accompanying article pointed out that Constellation Energy Group CEO Mayo A. Shattuck received $15.7 million in compensation for 2010, even as his company lost $1 billion. Something seems amiss here. Every year Mr. Shattuck gets a generous raise whether he does good or bad in his job. In February, 1994, Constellation/Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., retired about 800-plus employees.
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FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
In a recent interview with The Baltimore Sun, Molly Shattuck revealed that she and husband Mayo A. Shattuck III have separated. The former Ravens cheerleader, who is busy promoting her new book, "Vibrant Living," with a national tour, said the split is amicable. "We are separated. Mayo has a home 2.4 miles away. We still love each other and spend time together as a family," she said. Mayo Shattuck, the former CEO of Constellation Energy, was not immediately available to comment.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
Constellation Energy Group shareholders registered their opposition Friday to the pay package of Chief Executive Officer Mayo A. Shattuck III, sending a strong message of disapproval to the company's leadership after a year in which it lost nearly $1 billion. The Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. parent's board of directors is not bound by the result of the shareholders' first-ever "say on pay" vote; the board approved the compensation package for Shattuck and other senior executives earlier this year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Federal regulators investigating Exelon's Constellation commodities group say they have "preliminarily determined" that the division violated market-behavior rules. The brief notice, filed Friday by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said only that the alleged violations involve not providing accurate information to a power grid operator, the California Independent System Operator. FERC declined to comment. Constellation, the Baltimore energy company bought by Chicago-based Exelon last year, downplayed the investigation.
NEWS
March 10, 2004
On March 9, 2004, EDWARD A. SHATTUCK of Bel Air, MD. Beloved husband of Eileen L. Shattuck; devoted father of Marjorie L. Booth, Sandra M. Houck; loving grandfather of Marybeth K. Heckler, Alexandra M. Houck, and step-son of Eleanor Garven Shattuck. Memorial Services will be held at First Presbyterian Church on Sunday, March 14, 2004 at 3:30 P.M. with Rev. Richard J. Link officiating. Friends may call at the Church Sunday from 1:30 P.M. to 3:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers, those desiring may contribute to First Presbyterian Church Memorial Fund, 224 N. Main Street, Bel Air, MD 21014 or a charity of your choice.
NEWS
October 27, 2005
On Friday, October 21, 2005, RUTH ANNA SHATTUCK, 79, passed away at her home in Laurel, DE; wife of the late Arthur E. Shattuck; daughter to the late Francis G. Zeckman and Ida M. Straub Zeckman; sister to the late Helen Chambers; she is survived by her son, Steven Mark Shattuck of Selbyville, DE; daughter Bonita Ann Shattuck Rees of Baldwin, MD; grandchildren Michael David Rees of Austin, TX, Keleigh Elizabeth Rees Wetherill of Fallston, MD, Paige Rees...
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | December 17, 2008
Baltimore's Molly Shattuck says she "despises" the title of the Fox reality series in which she is featured tonight - Secret Millionaire - but "loves" the show. Shattuck, wife of Constellation Energy CEO Mayo Shattuck, goes "undercover" for a week as a worker in a hair salon and a waitress in a restaurant in an eastern Pennsylvania mining town hit hard by the tough economic times. Read my interview with her about her experiences on Secret Millionaire at my Z on TV blog. (10 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45)
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 3, 2009
There goes that O'Malley guy again, playing to populist outrage about our gas-and-electric bills and the fat cats at Constellation Energy. Martin O'Malley worked this issue to become governor in 2006; now he's running for re-election with it, and who can blame him? It's not like he has to say much to get the crowd riled up. There's plenty of genuine populist anger these days - and it's aimed at corporate America instead of the usual target, American government. Indeed, the only outrage we've heard from elected leaders in the last 30 years was the Reagan-inspired variety that went something like: government bad, Wall Street good; government is too big, taxes too high, unions too powerful, and unless the wealthy get tax breaks and we deregulate everything and bust the unions, the whole country will be on welfare under a Marxist regime.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 21, 2009
How hard is it to be fired from the top reaches of corporate America? Consider the strange case of Mayo A. Shattuck III, chairman and chief executive of Baltimore-based Constellation Energy. Commodity bets with borrowed money and market turmoil nearly pushed Constellation into bankruptcy in September. The company's stock has fallen 75 percent since the beginning of 2008. Constellation shares have delivered about the same return as a broad basket of U.S. electricity and utility stocks since Shattuck took over in late 2001.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 2, 2006
Of course Mayo Shattuck would rather get paid for thinking about luxury boxes and cheerleaders and TV revenues than electricity futures. Of course he wants to be National Football League commissioner. Of course Baltimore frets about what that might mean for BGE parent Constellation Energy, which Shattuck runs. But it's the wrong thing to worry about. Partly because he probably won't get the job. Partly because it would make little difference to Constellation's future, even if he did. But mainly because there are bigger factors in Baltimore's energy future than whether Shattuck gets to hand out the Lombardi trophy.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Mayo A. Shattuck III, who coordinated the sale of two Baltimore institutions to out-of-state concerns and ran the region's power company for a volatile decade, has retired from the parent of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. Chicago-based Exelon Corp. didn't announce his retirement so much as mention in passing — in a hefty securities filing Thursday — that Feb. 28 was his last day as an employee. But Shattuck, 58, isn't cutting ties with the company. Previously executive chairman, he is now non-executive chairman of Exelon's board.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2012
As pay raises go, it's hard to beat a fivefold increase. That's the jump Hunt Valley-based Omega Healthcare Investors' CEO saw in compensation last year. After getting a thumbs down for its executive pay from a shareholder advisory firm, the company told investors his pay package skyrocketed to $7.8 million because stock awards at the firm are doled out once every three years or so, and 2011 was one of those years. But even with the adjustments Omega suggests, such as dividing the multiyear incentives by three, CEO C. Taylor Pickett's pay doubled — in a year in which the company's profits and stock price fell.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Mayo A. Shattuck IlI -- who successfully engineered the sale of Constellation Energy Group to Chicago-based Exelon Corp. – took in $17.3 million in total compensation last year, a nearly 11 percent increase from 2010. Shattuck's base salary of $1.3 million was unchanged from a year earlier. He received no cash incentive payment last year, compared with a $1.7 million payout in 2010. The compensation package, which the company reported Friday, includes additional payouts in stocks, options and the value of his pension.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Constellation Energy Group and Exelon Corp. are expected to close their $7.9 billion merger Monday, after the deal cleared its final regulatory hurdle Friday. The approval by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ends an almost yearlong effort to combine the companies — creating the largest non-utility energy provider in the United States. The deal also means that Baltimore will lose its last Fortune 500 company; the new company will be headquartered in Chicago but will maintain a large footprint here, including a new building in Harbor Point.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Constellation Energy Group's three directors have been named to serve on Exelon's board of directors once the merger between the two energy giants is completed Constellation Energy Group's three directors have been named to serve on Exelon's board of directors once the merger between the two energy giants is completed, according to documents filed Wednesday. Ann C. Berzin, a Constellation director since 2008; Yves C. de Balmann, a director since 2003; and Robert J. Lawless, a director since 2002, are to join Constellation Chief Executive Officer and Chairman Mayo A. Shattuck III, who was previously named as executive chairman of the board.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
Constellation Energy Group, which is selling itself to Exelon Corp., reported a loss Friday in the fourth quarter, what is expected to be the energy giant's last earnings release as a publicly traded Baltimore company. Its earnings came out before the Maryland Public Service Commission approved the proposed $7.9 billion proposed merger between Constellation and Exelon, contingent on several dozen conditions. It lost $583.6 million, or $2.91 per share, in the three months ended Dec. 31, compared with a profit of $159.8 million, or 80 cents per share, in the corresponding period the previous year.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 15, 2005
I have always hoped, for Baltimore's sake, that Constellation Energy CEO Mayo Shattuck saw himself as more than a deal maker. I hoped the former investment banker relished the challenge of showing he could operate a real industrial corporation, with dynamos and reactors and wires, over many years. I hoped he would build Constellation into a global energy giant, as he has shown every sign of doing. I hoped, when Shattuck became Constellation's boss four years ago, that he wouldn't just fix the company, shop it around to his Wall Street buddies and flip it at the first lucrative opportunity.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Evening Sun Staff | September 18, 1990
It was not just another weekend for Alden Shattuck.But then, this has not been just another season for Shattuck.He is in his sixth year as the men's soccer coach at Maryland. He is in his first as the women's coach.His tour of double duty was in evidence last weekend. On Friday, Shattuck traveled with his women to Chapel Hill, N.C. In search of their 10th national title in the last 12 years, the Tar Heels are the undisputed queens of collegiate women's soccer. They dismissed Maryland, 5-0.Shattuck returned with the women to College Park that night, then got right back on the road.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
You might have seen the news footage of the guy in the orange construction vest who a couple of weeks back angrily yelled at the Occupy Baltimore encampment that he was "working his butt off to support you guys," apparently referring to the unemployed among them. If he really wanted to protest where his tax money may be going, he could have walked a couple of blocks from McKeldin Square. The findings of a new study indicate that because of corporate tax breaks, rebates and loopholes, many Fortune 500 companies pay little or no federal income taxes on their profits.
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