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By Karin Remesch | September 13, 2001
History comes alive in Sharpsburg this week when Rebels and Yankees march through the town in observance of the 139th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - the Civil War's bloodiest day. Civil War events will be commemorated along the streets and byways of the town and at nearby Antietam National Battlefield. Beginning today and continuing through Monday, activities at the battlefield include lectures, ranger-led hikes and living history events. (Saturday's battlefield torchlight tour is filled)
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | May 28, 2007
In the lobby of the Washington County humane society, gift baskets for puppies are on sale. "Don't Leave Without Me" reads a handmade sign in the cat suite, which is home to a 14-pound Tabby named Lucky. Boyd the rabbit - "gender unknown" - twiddles in his cage. But what happens when an animal adoption agency finds itself the sudden recipient of 75 horses in need of a home? "I knew it was a situation we had to deal with," says Paul Miller, the group's executive director. "Whatever it took, we had to do it."
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NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1998
SHARPSBURG -- If time heals all wounds, then maybe a clock can mend a loss.Two months ago, Roy Ebersole's wife, Pansy, was lying in a nursing home, dying of a degenerative disease. Her only request to her husband: Give Sharpsburg a clock for the town square.No one knows why the 79-year-old wanted the timepiece. Not her husband, her other relatives or her closest friends.But within two weeks of her death, Mr. Ebersole, 80, had a friend notify the town that he wanted to give it a clock. Sharpsburg officials couldn't believe their good fortune.
FEATURES
September 16, 2006
9 a.m. HISTORIC SHARPSBURG -- Remember the Battle of Antietam with period music, lectures, children's activities and crafts during Sharpsburg Heritage Day, which runs until 5 p.m., in downtown Sharpsburg. For information, visit sharpsburghistoricalsociety.org or call 301-432-6856. 10 a.m. REPTILE RENDEZVOUS -- If you love snakes, lizards, frogs and other cold-blooded creatures check out the Mid-Atlantic Reptile Show that runs until 4:30 p.m. today and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow at the 4-H Hall at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
SHARPSBURG - Here it is, the latest battle at Antietam. William Chaney is on one side. The Civil War buff and businessman from Anne Arundel County owns a historic farmhouse and plot of land just off the national battlefield. And now he's moving on a plan to restore the building to its wartime appearance, open a museum and put up three Confederate monuments. Arrayed against him are local Civil War enthusiasts and town officials in nearby Sharpsburg. They argue that Chaney's plan crosses a line.
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2004
SHARPSBURG - Hours before the World Knights of the Ku Klux Klan came to this small town yesterday, before its imperial wizard paraded up a side street to the town's Little League field with seven men and one woman in tow, the Rev. Malcolm Stranathan went to church to pray. About 60 other people joined Stranathan for the 9:30 a.m. service at Dunker Church on Antietam National Battlefield, which borders the town. And just as people have done since a bloody Civil War battle here killed or wounded 23,000 soldiers Sept.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | May 28, 2007
In the lobby of the Washington County humane society, gift baskets for puppies are on sale. "Don't Leave Without Me" reads a handmade sign in the cat suite, which is home to a 14-pound Tabby named Lucky. Boyd the rabbit - "gender unknown" - twiddles in his cage. But what happens when an animal adoption agency finds itself the sudden recipient of 75 horses in need of a home? "I knew it was a situation we had to deal with," says Paul Miller, the group's executive director. "Whatever it took, we had to do it."
NEWS
July 4, 1998
The caption for maps in yesterday's editions pinpointing the locations of Annapolis and Loudon Park national cemeteries incorrectly stated that they are the only two in Maryland of the 14 original national cemeteries established in 1862. There is a third -- Antietam National Cemetery in Sharpsburg.The Sun regrets the errorsPub Date: 7/04/98
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1995
SHARPSBURG -- The nation's largest Civil War group is considering a move from Virginia to a more visible site in Sharpsburg, which is in the heart of a three-state battlefield concentration, including nearby Antietam.A move to Sharpsburg would place the Association for the Preservation of Civil War Sites Inc. in reach of about 2.2 million people who visit Antietam, Harpers Ferry, W. Va., and Gettysburg, Pa., each year, said Dennis E. Frye, the nonprofit group's president.The association now is housed in Fredericksburg, Va., near well-known, but less-visited Civil War battlefields.
FEATURES
May 11, 1992
TODAYTour Du Pont. Afternoon finish of more than 120 world-class cyclists in downtown Hagerstown in America's premier cycling competition. Morning start tomorrow out of Sharpsburg on the way to the Massanutten Resort in Virginia. (804) 354-9934. Free.Sunrise at Old Hilltop. Pimlico Race Course. 7 a.m. Tours of Pimlico, including the backstretch, as well as visits with Preakness Stakes competitors. Also, tomorrow to Friday. (410) 542-9400. Free.Phillips Preakness Celebration Crab Picking Contest.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Sharpsburg -- Calling themselves the "ghosts of the Confederacy," white supremacists from several groups held a rally at Antietam National Battlefield yesterday, the first time any group has been permitted to demonstrate at the site of the bloodiest day of the Civil War. About 30 men, women and children gathered at what was a family farm at the time of the battle to commemorate their "forefathers" who "fought for our liberty as white men," said Gordon...
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2004
SHARPSBURG - Hours before the World Knights of the Ku Klux Klan came to this small town yesterday, before its imperial wizard paraded up a side street to the town's Little League field with seven men and one woman in tow, the Rev. Malcolm Stranathan went to church to pray. About 60 other people joined Stranathan for the 9:30 a.m. service at Dunker Church on Antietam National Battlefield, which borders the town. And just as people have done since a bloody Civil War battle here killed or wounded 23,000 soldiers Sept.
NEWS
September 8, 2002
The correspondent of the New York Tribune gives a detailed account of the battle of Wednesday, the 17th, which he terms "the greatest fight since Waterloo, and contested all over the field, with an obstinacy equal even to Waterloo." It appears, from his statement, that Tuesday was spent chiefly in deploying forces and gaining positions. After the day was over, Gen. Hooker remarked: "We are through for tonight, but tomorrow we will fight the battle that will decide the fate of the Republic."
NEWS
By Kristen Lorek and Kristen Lorek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2002
"A.P. Hill is coming!" This was the rallying cry of Gen. Robert E. Lee's desperately pressed forces of the right flank at the Battle of Antietam. Only three days earlier, Maj. Gen. Ambrose Powell Hill had been assigned to rear guard garrison duty at Harper's Ferry, which was then in Virginia. But now he was a Confederate hero, having marched his men at a killing pace of 17 miles in eight hours to prevent a Union breakthrough of Lee's forces at Sharpsburg. Under heavy fire, Hill saved Lee's army from annihilation.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2002
As Americans turn their thoughts toward remembering the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, the Maryland Historical Society opened a poignant exhibit the other day recalling an earlier traumatic event in the nation's history. Remembering Antietam: John Philemon Smith's Shadowbox tells the story of the Battle of Antietam, where 23,000 Union and Confederate troops were either killed or wounded, on another September day, making it the bloodiest 24 hours of the Civil War. The great clash came at Sharpsburg, a small Western Maryland village, when 87,000 federal troops under the command of Gen. George B. McClellan met the Army of Northern Virginia, some 40,000 strong, under the command of Gen. Robert E. Lee. On the evening before the battle, Union Gen. Joseph Hooker, sensing the urgency of the coming battle, said: "We are through for tonight, but tomorrow we fight the battle that will decide the fate of the Republic."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
ANTIETAM - It's hard to imagine on such a warm and beautiful Maryland spring day that this tranquil place of soft, rolling hills, freshly plowed fields and blooming dogwood and cherry trees was the setting for one of the nation's greatest human struggles. In mid-September 1862, the fate of a nation seemingly converged at a rural Western Maryland village called Sharpsburg. It was here that Gen. Robert E. Lee came with his Army of Northern Virginia, some 40,000 strong and flushed with its recent victory at Manassas, to clash with 87,000 federal troops under Gen. George B. McClellan.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1994
SHARPSBURG -- Betty Fairbourn washed and scrubbed her front porch. Her neighbors along Main Street painted trim around windows and doors, planted flowers and hung the Stars and Stripes.Remembering their own and the country's war dead on Decoration Day -- the original name by which Memorial Day is still widely known here -- is a big affair in this quiet, small Western Maryland town."It's the most important holiday in Sharpsburg -- next to Christmas," said Jan Wetterer, a town resident who is a member of the committee that organized yesterday's 127th annual parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | September 13, 2001
History comes alive in Sharpsburg this week when Rebels and Yankees march through the town in observance of the 139th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam - the Civil War's bloodiest day. Civil War events will be commemorated along the streets and byways of the town and at nearby Antietam National Battlefield. Beginning today and continuing through Monday, activities at the battlefield include lectures, ranger-led hikes and living history events. (Saturday's battlefield torchlight tour is filled)
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