Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSharon Gless
IN THE NEWS

Sharon Gless

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 17, 1990
Let's get right to the part of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" tha everyone is going to be talking about: the opening.The new drama, starring Sharon Gless as attorney Rosie O'Neill, opens in a psychiatrist's office. We don't see the psychiatrist. We see only a tight shot of Gless' face. It is as if she is talking straight to the viewer.The first words we hear Gless' Rosie O'Neill say are: "I'm %J thinking about maybe having my tits done. I mean, I don't want them any bigger. They're a nice size.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2006
Eighty years ago last July, a Tennessee courtroom erupted in a furious battle over the teaching of evolution in schools. As legal titans William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow clashed in the landmark Scopes "monkey" trial, the country tuned in to listen -- a first, thanks to the youthful medium of radio. To commemorate that event, L.A. Theatre Works has re-created the 1925 "trial of the century" radio experience for a 24-city, live radio theater tour of British playwright Peter Goodchild's docudrama The Great Tennessee Monkey Trial, based on the trial transcripts.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 19, 1991
These are trying times for fans of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," who are in for some unpleasant surprises tonight. For one thing, the much-promoted start of a romance between Rosie (Sharon Gless) and a character portrayed by Robert Wagner will not air. Instead, viewers will find a rerun of last season's Christmas show -- the one in which Rosie defends an elf.Much worse, tonight all but marks the end of the line for "Rosie." Though the official word from CBS is that the show will be placed "on hiatus" and could return in March after the Winter Olympics, executive producer Barney Rosenzweig told The Sun this week that the program is shutting down production.
NEWS
November 25, 1998
Valentin M. Berezhkov, 82, a Russian diplomat who translated for Josef Stalin and other Soviet officials during crucial World War II conferences, died Friday of a heart attack in Claremont, Calif., two months after undergoing heart surgery.Before World War II, Mr. Berezhkov was an assistant to Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov and first secretary of the Soviet Embassy in Berlin, where he translated for officials in their meetings with Nazi leaders.Dick O'Neill, 70, whose nearly half-century in entertainment included roles ranging from Santa Claus on "Fresh Prince of Bel Air" to Detective Chris Cagney's father on "Cagney & Lacey," died Nov. 17 in Santa Monica, Calif.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Fascinating females dominate the lineup tonight, with Julie Andrews performing in a pledge-raising Broadway special on PBS and Sharon Gless and Tyne Daly back for another "Cagney & Lacey" film.* "Great Performances -- Julie Andrews: Back on Broadway" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- A PBS "mini-pledge drive" accompanies the broadcast of this special, with live begging breaks from the Broadway studio where Ms. Andrews is currently performing "Victor/Victoria." (As part of its mini-pledge drive, MPT will also re-screen Part 1 of its recent documentary series "Gone But Not Forgotten," at 10 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
"The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" has all the right intentions, but something seems wrong with this picture, something that's hard to put your finger on. It's just so . . . so conventional.Here's Sharon Gless, back in her old Monday at 10 o'clock on CBS time slot she had with "Cagney and Lacey," back with the creator of that show, Barney Rosenzweig, ready to use her squinty smile, likability and considerable talent to take on the problems of a divorced, childless, middle-age woman.That's all well and good.
NEWS
November 25, 1998
Valentin M. Berezhkov, 82, a Russian diplomat who translated for Josef Stalin and other Soviet officials during crucial World War II conferences, died Friday of a heart attack in Claremont, Calif., two months after undergoing heart surgery.Before World War II, Mr. Berezhkov was an assistant to Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov and first secretary of the Soviet Embassy in Berlin, where he translated for officials in their meetings with Nazi leaders.Dick O'Neill, 70, whose nearly half-century in entertainment included roles ranging from Santa Claus on "Fresh Prince of Bel Air" to Detective Chris Cagney's father on "Cagney & Lacey," died Nov. 17 in Santa Monica, Calif.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 12, 1994
Most of the good sitcoms tonight are showing repeats -- as is "NYPD Blue," which automatically makes it a can-miss Tuesday night. The night's biggest draw is Sharon Gless in a dual role on a new CBS telemovie, but as star turns go, it's more flashy than sturdy.* "The Good Life" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- NBC is pulling the curtain, at least for the season, on some of its new sitcoms tonight. This is the last first-run episode of "The Good Life," for example, unless it's renewed, which isn't all that likely.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
What is the biggest freshwater lake in the world? A fascinating repeat of the PBS series "Nova" answers the geography quiz tonight. In addition, two recent films made in Baltimore get a cable screening.* "Nova: Journey to the Sacred Sea" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The title describes the traditional name for Lake Baikal, which stretches across 400 miles of Siberia and is estimated to hold one-fifth of the fresh water on Earth. The repeat episode examines its ancient history.
FEATURES
June 18, 1998
"The New Explorers" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m., A&E) notes that every three seconds somewhere on Earth there is a sighting of an unidentified flying object. In "Bringing UFOs Down to Earth," host Bill Kurtis and his team head out to investigate two sighting reports -- one on the edge of a rain forest in Brazil and the other in the town of Puebla, Mexico. Both believers and skeptics are interviewed before Kurtis draws his own conclusions.At a glance"C-16" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
June 18, 1998
"The New Explorers" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m., A&E) notes that every three seconds somewhere on Earth there is a sighting of an unidentified flying object. In "Bringing UFOs Down to Earth," host Bill Kurtis and his team head out to investigate two sighting reports -- one on the edge of a rain forest in Brazil and the other in the town of Puebla, Mexico. Both believers and skeptics are interviewed before Kurtis draws his own conclusions.At a glance"C-16" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 14, 1996
At last, the final installment of the Stepford Quartet has arrived, and a real scholarly investigation into the meaning of Stepford, Conn., in the American psyche can truly begin.Some of us have been waiting for this moment since the birth of this great body of work some 20 years ago with the film "The Stepford Wives" -- featuring those perfectly happy little ladies smiling and dusting and dying to please hubby out in the suburbs. That was followed in 1980 by "Revenge of the Stepford Wives," a made-for-television bit of backlash starring Sharon Gless (soon to become proto-feminist television cop Chris Cagney)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1995
Fascinating females dominate the lineup tonight, with Julie Andrews performing in a pledge-raising Broadway special on PBS and Sharon Gless and Tyne Daly back for another "Cagney & Lacey" film.* "Great Performances -- Julie Andrews: Back on Broadway" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- A PBS "mini-pledge drive" accompanies the broadcast of this special, with live begging breaks from the Broadway studio where Ms. Andrews is currently performing "Victor/Victoria." (As part of its mini-pledge drive, MPT will also re-screen Part 1 of its recent documentary series "Gone But Not Forgotten," at 10 p.m.)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
What is the biggest freshwater lake in the world? A fascinating repeat of the PBS series "Nova" answers the geography quiz tonight. In addition, two recent films made in Baltimore get a cable screening.* "Nova: Journey to the Sacred Sea" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The title describes the traditional name for Lake Baikal, which stretches across 400 miles of Siberia and is estimated to hold one-fifth of the fresh water on Earth. The repeat episode examines its ancient history.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | November 4, 1994
Too many TV reunions wind up like a high school reunion: A good idea in theory, but in fact it's kind of depressing.Fans of "Cagney & Lacey," the Emmy-winning series that ran from 1982-1988, will want "Cagney & Lacey: The Return" to mean but one thing: The two intrepid cops are back on the beat.Alas, too much of this TV movie, which will air on CBS (Channel 11) Sunday at 9 p.m., is concerned with tweaking the plot so that the two do get back together. The teleplay by Terry Louise Fisher and Steve Brown offers more exposition than action, expending a lot of wasted energy reminding us that Cagney could be a loose cannon and that the partnership was, as Cagney repeatedly exults, "great."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 12, 1994
Most of the good sitcoms tonight are showing repeats -- as is "NYPD Blue," which automatically makes it a can-miss Tuesday night. The night's biggest draw is Sharon Gless in a dual role on a new CBS telemovie, but as star turns go, it's more flashy than sturdy.* "The Good Life" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- NBC is pulling the curtain, at least for the season, on some of its new sitcoms tonight. This is the last first-run episode of "The Good Life," for example, unless it's renewed, which isn't all that likely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2006
Eighty years ago last July, a Tennessee courtroom erupted in a furious battle over the teaching of evolution in schools. As legal titans William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow clashed in the landmark Scopes "monkey" trial, the country tuned in to listen -- a first, thanks to the youthful medium of radio. To commemorate that event, L.A. Theatre Works has re-created the 1925 "trial of the century" radio experience for a 24-city, live radio theater tour of British playwright Peter Goodchild's docudrama The Great Tennessee Monkey Trial, based on the trial transcripts.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | November 4, 1994
Too many TV reunions wind up like a high school reunion: A good idea in theory, but in fact it's kind of depressing.Fans of "Cagney & Lacey," the Emmy-winning series that ran from 1982-1988, will want "Cagney & Lacey: The Return" to mean but one thing: The two intrepid cops are back on the beat.Alas, too much of this TV movie, which will air on CBS (Channel 11) Sunday at 9 p.m., is concerned with tweaking the plot so that the two do get back together. The teleplay by Terry Louise Fisher and Steve Brown offers more exposition than action, expending a lot of wasted energy reminding us that Cagney could be a loose cannon and that the partnership was, as Cagney repeatedly exults, "great."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,TV Critic | March 25, 1992
Washington -- Call it Rosie O'Neill goes to Washington. More elaborate efforts may have been made to save a TV show from cancellation, but surely none has been as public as the campaign by Sharon Gless and her husband, Barney Rosenzweig, to save "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," which has been on "hiatus" and out of production since December. Last night, the Gless-Rosenzweig save-our-show bandwagon rolled into Washington, where some very high-profile women in law and politics climbed aboard.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | December 19, 1991
These are trying times for fans of "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill," who are in for some unpleasant surprises tonight. For one thing, the much-promoted start of a romance between Rosie (Sharon Gless) and a character portrayed by Robert Wagner will not air. Instead, viewers will find a rerun of last season's Christmas show -- the one in which Rosie defends an elf.Much worse, tonight all but marks the end of the line for "Rosie." Though the official word from CBS is that the show will be placed "on hiatus" and could return in March after the Winter Olympics, executive producer Barney Rosenzweig told The Sun this week that the program is shutting down production.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.