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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Those lucky enough to have beach plans this weekend should count on seeing some sharks. No, not while you're swimming. Fingers crossed. Over at the Ocean City Fishing Center where the annual OC shark-fishing tournament gets under way today. Spectators are invited to watch the weigh-ins at 3:30 p.m. today through Saturday for free. On Sunday, the awards ceremony starts at 1 p.m. (You do have to pay fees to enter the tournament.) I can't pretend to know a lot about shark fishing because, frankly, if I spot one I'll be shark running, but this report highlights efforts the tournament is making to further emphasize catch and release this year.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Was it Big Kahuna? That's just a guess after seeing a video of a shark circling a boat off the coast of Ocean City that was posted online by University of Maryland student Aaron Caplan. Caplan, 19, said he was shark fishing with friends on July 30 about 5-6 miles off shore when a great white shark became curious about his boat. He estimated the shark was about 13-15 feet - a wee bit smaller than his 24-foot fishing boat. "It got close enough that we identified it as a great white," he said in a phone interview Thursday, adding that he never expected to attract anything that big. "We actually got to pet it one of the times when it rubbed against the boat.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The federal government has announced rules that will reduce some commercial shark fishing by half and impose new limits on recreational fishermen.With Atlantic shark populations at historically low levels because of overfishing and threats to their habitat, the rules by the National Marine Fisheries Service will affect about 150 commercial fishermen and thousands of recreational fishermen along the Atlantic coast primarily from Florida to North Carolina.For South Florida shark fishermen, the new regulations mean the first six-month shark fishing season will end about three months early at 11:30 p.m. on April 7, and will remain closed until the second season begins July 1.The rules set new limits on fishing for 39 species of sharks and bans intentional fishing for five species considered rare or vulnerable, including great white sharks made famous by the "Jaws" book and movies.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Those lucky enough to have beach plans this weekend should count on seeing some sharks. No, not while you're swimming. Fingers crossed. Over at the Ocean City Fishing Center where the annual OC shark-fishing tournament gets under way today. Spectators are invited to watch the weigh-ins at 3:30 p.m. today through Saturday for free. On Sunday, the awards ceremony starts at 1 p.m. (You do have to pay fees to enter the tournament.) I can't pretend to know a lot about shark fishing because, frankly, if I spot one I'll be shark running, but this report highlights efforts the tournament is making to further emphasize catch and release this year.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 16, 1991
Department of Natural Resources forest wildlife supervisor Josh Sandt predicted a record harvest of wild turkeys this spring, and Maryland hunters produced one, beating last year's record by 24 birds.But the four-week season for gobblers that ended May 16 still managed to spring a small suprise on Wildlife Division officials."The harvest was above expectations in the new counties open for the first time on the Eastern Shore," said Assistant Secretary Donald E. MacLauchlan. "We anticipated a moderate harvest of approximately 40 birds in the newly opened counties."
FEATURES
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 31, 1992
Ocean City -- The locals call Mark Sampson shark hunter.But Mr. Sampson, a sometimes lecturer and demonstrator of shark and offshore fishing techniques, calls himself a shark fisherman. Nothing more.Rods and reels are his tools -- not guns. He may use a 30-pound tuna head for bait -- but not animal blood.His 40-foot boat is named Fish Finder, a misnomer given the fact that he has built a reputation specializing in fishing for sharks -- makos, duskies, hammerheads and tigers -- miles off the Atlantic coast.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 1999
HONOLULU -- Although the threat to humans from shark attacks is infinitesimally low -- even in a state encircled by prime shark habitat -- human attacks on sharks are another matter. And lately, thinking about the animals has taken a turn in the shark's favor -- chiefly because of a savory and costly broth. Concern is growing about fishing pressure on Pacific Ocean sharks, primarily blue sharks, which seldom invade places where they threaten humans. As Asia has prospered, so has its appetite for shark-fin soup.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- As the first boats came to the scales late Thursday afternoon on the first day of the annual O.C. Shark Tournament, murmurs of expectation spread through the more than 200 spectators gathered on the deck near the Flying Fish Saloon.Mark Sampson, the tournament director, who has popularized shark fishing over the years at Maryland's bustling oceanside resort, had relayed committee boat reports of good catches of blue and mako shark coming in, and the crowd at the Ocean City Fishing Center was anxious and curious.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
For saltwater fishermen in the area, Saturday offers a chance to pick up tips from a panel of national and regional experts on inshore and offshore fishing, as Salt Water Sportsman magazine brings its national tour to the Adele H. Stamp Union on the University of Maryland campus in College Park.The seven-hour program is organized and run by TV host Mark Sosin and Salt Water Sportsman editor George Poveromo, but draws heavily on the expertise of captains who regularly fish Maryland waters.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Was it Big Kahuna? That's just a guess after seeing a video of a shark circling a boat off the coast of Ocean City that was posted online by University of Maryland student Aaron Caplan. Caplan, 19, said he was shark fishing with friends on July 30 about 5-6 miles off shore when a great white shark became curious about his boat. He estimated the shark was about 13-15 feet - a wee bit smaller than his 24-foot fishing boat. "It got close enough that we identified it as a great white," he said in a phone interview Thursday, adding that he never expected to attract anything that big. "We actually got to pet it one of the times when it rubbed against the boat.
SPORTS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2003
Carole Lorden played 6-1-3 in the Maryland lottery and lost. But her husband, Don, struck it big with the same numbers during last weekend's Ocean City Shark Fishing Tournament, setting a state record for thresher shark. Don Lorden hooked the 613-pound deep-sea monster on June 13, the middle day of the three-day tournament. The thresher was just under 15 feet long, or better than two David Robinsons end-to-end, and was bigger around than Verne Troyer, or "Mini-Me," is tall. To put it another way, Lorden's boat is only 10 feet longer than his catch.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 1999
HONOLULU -- Although the threat to humans from shark attacks is infinitesimally low -- even in a state encircled by prime shark habitat -- human attacks on sharks are another matter. And lately, thinking about the animals has taken a turn in the shark's favor -- chiefly because of a savory and costly broth. Concern is growing about fishing pressure on Pacific Ocean sharks, primarily blue sharks, which seldom invade places where they threaten humans. As Asia has prospered, so has its appetite for shark-fin soup.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- As the first boats came to the scales late Thursday afternoon on the first day of the annual O.C. Shark Tournament, murmurs of expectation spread through the more than 200 spectators gathered on the deck near the Flying Fish Saloon.Mark Sampson, the tournament director, who has popularized shark fishing over the years at Maryland's bustling oceanside resort, had relayed committee boat reports of good catches of blue and mako shark coming in, and the crowd at the Ocean City Fishing Center was anxious and curious.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON - The federal government has announced rules that will reduce some commercial shark fishing by half and impose new limits on recreational fishermen.With Atlantic shark populations at historically low levels because of overfishing and threats to their habitat, the rules by the National Marine Fisheries Service will affect about 150 commercial fishermen and thousands of recreational fishermen along the Atlantic coast primarily from Florida to North Carolina.For South Florida shark fishermen, the new regulations mean the first six-month shark fishing season will end about three months early at 11:30 p.m. on April 7, and will remain closed until the second season begins July 1.The rules set new limits on fishing for 39 species of sharks and bans intentional fishing for five species considered rare or vulnerable, including great white sharks made famous by the "Jaws" book and movies.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
For saltwater fishermen in the area, Saturday offers a chance to pick up tips from a panel of national and regional experts on inshore and offshore fishing, as Salt Water Sportsman magazine brings its national tour to the Adele H. Stamp Union on the University of Maryland campus in College Park.The seven-hour program is organized and run by TV host Mark Sosin and Salt Water Sportsman editor George Poveromo, but draws heavily on the expertise of captains who regularly fish Maryland waters.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 20, 1995
There is much that "Get Shorty" doesn't get -- Elmore Leonard, for one thing -- but it gets one thing right, and that's enough: the star power of John Travolta.As Chili Palmer, made guy and loan shark, Travolta swaggers through this movie blasting out radiant waves of happy machismo and fearless good cheer, bending the whole thing around him until ugly memories of "Grease" are exiled and "Pulp Fiction" is all that remains. It's not that he's a tough guy -- although he is -- but that he simply can't imagine people denying him anything and that he's so full of confidence, he just takes what he wants.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
A world record was almost broken in Ocean City.Mark Aiello and his father, Joseph Aiello of Severna Park, were fishing in the Marlin Club's Light Tackle 20 Pound Test Release Tournament on the boat Reel'n and Deal'n on July 25 when Mark hung into a 298-pound big-eye tuna. Mark fought the fish for more than 4 1/2 hours. Finally, he could not move or even feel his hand anymore. He gave the rod to his father, who fought the huge fish for another half hour. Since two people handled the rod, it could not be considered as a world record for a big-eye tuna on 20-pound test.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 30, 1995
The mere mention of it brought laughter from my children and a quizzical look from my wife. A neighbor agreed to go along, but he, too, was skeptical."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 30, 1995
The mere mention of it brought laughter from my children and a quizzical look from my wife. A neighbor agreed to go along, but he, too, was skeptical."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 26, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- Talk of sharks, while picking up a chocolate shake from a Dumsers stand, might cause a few eyebrows to be raised by anxious parents within earshot along the boardwalk.But that same conversation, held in the cabana bar at the Ocean City Fishing Center this past week, might evoke wide grins and strings of stories about makos, tigers, blues, hammerheads and even great whites taken from nearby waters of the Atlantic Ocean.This resort city, more famous among anglers for its white marlin and tuna fishing, sports a small, intense recreational fishery for sharks.
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