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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 2000
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications, the No. 1 U.S. local-telephone company, said yesterday that it will grant 210,000 employees options to buy 55 million shares of stock to give them a stake in the carrier's financial performance. The "Founders' Grant" options are priced at $43.34 per share, about equal to the current share price, the company said. They will vest in three years. Recipients will include certain hourly, salaried and part-time workers on Verizon's U.S. payroll and some international and overseas employees.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
First Mariner Bancorp's newly retired chief executive told regulators that he sold just over 1 million shares of company stock this week — for a grand total of $21,084. Edwin F. Hale Sr., who founded the Baltimore parent of 1 s t Mariner Bank, said in a securities filing made public today that he reduced his holdings to about 2 million shares. He remains the largest shareholder of the company, which is struggling to survive after years of losses. Hale reported that he sold his shares in two batches on Wednesday, each "in a private sale to an individual" for 2 cents per share.
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BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
Linthicum-based Ciena Corp. said yesterday that it has raised $1.52 billion through a secondary stock offering and the sale of convertible notes. In the offering, Ciena sold 11 million shares of common stock at $83.50 a share. The company, which makes fiber-optic equipment, also sold $600 million of convertible notes, which will be convertible into shares of stock at about $104.38 a share. The notes are due Feb. 1, 2008. Ciena said it raised $919 million from the stock sale. The company has about 299 million shares of stock outstanding after the offering, according to a securities filing.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
I want to give shares of stock to a Catholic school. The stock is trading at about $100, but I bought it a long time ago for about $15. Is my deduction the present price or the purchase price of the stock? - M.M., Joppa, Md. This question illustrates why people are smart to donate shares of stock, mutual funds or bonds to charitable organizations, instead of giving cash. When you give shares of stock to a charitable organization, you can deduct the full value on your taxes - or about $100 a share in this case.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 29, 1992
Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. said yesterday that it sold 3.6 million shares of stock to the public for $8.50 apiece, raising more than $28 million to support the company's drive to develop new drugs for inflammation and central nervous system disorders.The company could gain an additional $5.1 million, minus underwriting commissions, if underwriters led by Tucker Anthony Inc. sell an additional 600,000 shares.Nova said it authorized the additional sale if demand for its shares was unexpectedly high.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
Seeking additional capital to support its growth, the holding company for Provident Bank of Maryland yesterday announced it has agreed to sell 550,000 shares of stock in Europe to raise between $13 million and $15 million."
BUSINESS
April 9, 1998
Optelecom Inc., a Gaithersburg manufacturer of telecommunications equipment, said yesterday that it has filed to seek shareholder approval to triple the amount of stock it may offer.Optelecom currently has 5 million authorized shares of stock, with 2 million shares outstanding. It wants to increase its authorized shares to 15 million.The company has filed proxy materials with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and plans to announce the results of mail-in balloting at its May 4 shareholders' meeting.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 28, 2000
Do you take "curbstone tips" when buying stocks, hoping Lady Luck will bail you out of mistakes? Here's a better idea: "Before investing, ask your adviser these `must' questions," says Family Money, July-August: Does the company show consistent sales and earnings growth? Is the firm gaining market share? Does the company raise its dividends regularly? How does the business stack up against competition? Do you see legal or regulatory problems ahead? SENIOR CIRCUIT: "Grandparents who want to pay for college should consider capital gains taxes.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2003
A year after a bankruptcy filing made its stock worthless, US Airways is preparing to once again sell shares to the public. For some, the move connotes the promise of the airline's future as a company. To others, it signifies the betrayal of the owners of the shares wiped out by the bankruptcy. US Airways filed for bankruptcy protection on Aug. 11, 2002, essentially eliminating 68 million shares of stock that had been worth more than $1 billion a year earlier. Now, the airline wants to start fresh.
FEATURES
By Susan Bondy and Susan Bondy,Creators Syndicate | December 24, 1995
A priest gets up in the pulpit and says to his congregation: "I have bad news, good news and bad news: The bad news is that the church has a leak in the roof. The good news is that we have the resources to fix it. The bad news is that the resources are in your pockets."If you're thinking about making any major donations this year, giving appreciated stocks to charities is definitely a good idea. You don't pay commissions to sell the stock, you don't pay capital gains tax and you get to deduct the full market value of the gift.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2004
Google Inc., the search engine giant whose first stock offering supposedly augurs a rebound for the technology economy and a rare opportunity for the small investor, may turn out to be neither. Some analysts fear that Google is taking too large a gamble in setting the price of its first public offering of stock so high and selling it auction style - registration for which is expected to close as soon as today. The auction will begin this month. "We think this is a formula for a financial train wreck," said David Menlow, president of IPOfinancial.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2004
Ciena Corp., the fourth-biggest U.S. maker of fiber-optic networking systems, said yesterday that it will purchase two privately held equipment makers for $636.7 million in stock. The Linthicum-based company also reported a net loss of $76.7 million, or 16 cents per share, which matched analysts' forecasts for its first fiscal quarter, which ended Dec. 31. That compared with a loss of $107.1 million, or 25 cents per share, for the corresponding quarter in 2003. Ciena has agreed to acquire Catena Networks Inc., a broadband access company with offices in Canada and North Carolina, for 77.5 million shares of stock, worth $486.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2003
A year after a bankruptcy filing made its stock worthless, US Airways is preparing to once again sell shares to the public. For some, the move connotes the promise of the airline's future as a company. To others, it signifies the betrayal of the owners of the shares wiped out by the bankruptcy. US Airways filed for bankruptcy protection on Aug. 11, 2002, essentially eliminating 68 million shares of stock that had been worth more than $1 billion a year earlier. Now, the airline wants to start fresh.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2003
In The Region Human Genome dissolves special development trusts Human Genome Science Inc. said yesterday that it has dissolved the special trusts it had been using to finance development of three real estate projects near its Rockville research campus. The dissolution was done to comply with new accounting rules. The trusts had required the company to maintain a level of cash as collateral for its lenders on the new research, corporate and manufacturing facilities. That meant some of the money it had was not available for drug development, and some on Wall Street feared that Human Genome would run out. The company said the arrangement gave it more favorable financing terms, but new guidance from the Financial Accounting Standards Board pushed HGSI to make the change.
BUSINESS
By Steve Rosen and Steve Rosen,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 15, 2002
For the past 10 years, Mary Lou and Bill Akright of Leawood, Kan., have carried on a Christmas tradition of giving their grandchildren a few shares of stock. It started with investments of $50 for each of their three oldest grandkids in Quaker Oats, the food company later acquired by PepsiCo. The seven younger grandchildren have received shares in McDonald's. The Akrights took advantage of stock-purchase programs that the companies offered to open accounts with small amounts of money.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
Legg Mason Inc. Chairman Raymond A. Mason received salary and a bonus worth $7.68 million in fiscal 2002 - and options to buy 350,000 shares of stock - in a year when the company continued its shift from regional brokerage house to nationwide asset manager. In a proxy statement filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Legg Mason detailed the overall compensation packages and stock ownership of top executives and investors. Mason owns 2.053 million shares of Legg Mason stock - 3.14 percent of the company - with a value of $101.
BUSINESS
By Gail Marksjarvis and Gail Marksjarvis,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
I want to give shares of stock to a Catholic school. The stock is trading at about $100, but I bought it a long time ago for about $15. Is my deduction the present price or the purchase price of the stock? - M.M., Joppa, Md. This question illustrates why people are smart to donate shares of stock, mutual funds or bonds to charitable organizations, instead of giving cash. When you give shares of stock to a charitable organization, you can deduct the full value on your taxes - or about $100 a share in this case.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
MNC Financial has successfully spun off its credit-card division in a public stock offering, raising enough money for the state's largest bank holding company to pay off $653 million in debts.The stock of MBNA Corp. began trading on the New York Stock Exchange today at 10:27 a.m. The first block of purchases was for 1.5 million shares at $23 a share. MBNA was trading at $23.37 1/2 a share at noon and was the second most active, with 3.1 million shares traded. The stock is trading under the symbol KRB.At midday, the stock of MNC Financial was trading at $3 a share, up 25 cents.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
Linthicum-based Ciena Corp. said yesterday that it has raised $1.52 billion through a secondary stock offering and the sale of convertible notes. In the offering, Ciena sold 11 million shares of common stock at $83.50 a share. The company, which makes fiber-optic equipment, also sold $600 million of convertible notes, which will be convertible into shares of stock at about $104.38 a share. The notes are due Feb. 1, 2008. Ciena said it raised $919 million from the stock sale. The company has about 299 million shares of stock outstanding after the offering, according to a securities filing.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 9, 2000
NEW YORK - Verizon Communications, the No. 1 U.S. local-telephone company, said yesterday that it will grant 210,000 employees options to buy 55 million shares of stock to give them a stake in the carrier's financial performance. The "Founders' Grant" options are priced at $43.34 per share, about equal to the current share price, the company said. They will vest in three years. Recipients will include certain hourly, salaried and part-time workers on Verizon's U.S. payroll and some international and overseas employees.
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