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By Ivan Amato and Ivan Amato,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 4, 1996
It is July 4, 1999. The Baltimore citizenry has crowded into the Inner Harbor, necks craned. The sound and trail of the first salvo of shells cranks up the excitement. Then all eyes track something that firework designers have been working toward for years. Spelled across the sky in letters of explosive color and light: "Baltimore 1999."Tonight this scenario won't play out in Baltimore, or elsewhere, but the Inner Harbor show will contain the seeds of such future displays.Shells that paint the sky with geometric shapes such as hearts, five-pointed stars, bow-ties and even peace signs represent today's cutting edge, says John Conkling, an adjunct chemistry professor at Washington College in Chestertown, and executive director of the American Pyrotechnics Association.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
A former Arizona state senator named Russell Pearce resigned as vice chairman of the state's Republican Party recently because he suggested that if he ran Medicaid, the first thing he'd do would be to put female recipients on birth control implants or require tubal ligation. Then he'd test all recipients for drugs and alcohol. If you want to reproduce or use drugs or alcohol, he reportedly told listeners on his radio show, "then get a job. " It's not surprising that a conservative Republican might perceive poor people as lazy and irresponsible, but the attack on Medicaid — the government-financed insurance program for the poor and working poor and, of course, the possibility of forced female sterility — was beyond the pale.
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FEATURES
Baltimore Sun reporter | February 2, 2012
Graphic designer Carla David, of Say Cheese! Paper Props in Savage, says a fun project is to create a "hand prop," a message for your valentine that attaches to a stick they can hold. The props look like a mask that people carry for masquerade parties, but they can be made into all sorts of shapes like hearts, a mustache or even letters. Supplies Vellum paper and metallic card stock Scissors Pencil Glue stick Popsicle sticks Directions Step 1: Make a sketch of a heart, lips, or a Valentine's phrase on vellum paper.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore residents are asked to participate in a survey measuring qualify of life issues in the city, online and by phone through Sept. 29, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. The Citizens Survey, which has been conducted since 2009, serves as a report card for the city, Rawlings-Blake said. City agencies use the data to write their budget proposals and gauge their performance. The mayor urged residents to participate. "It is imperative that we have a clear understanding of what issues are impacting our communities," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 11, 1991
Fashion isn't just about big, sweeping changes. It isn't just about short or long hemlines, tight or loose shapes, neutral or bright colors.Fashion is also about details. It's about knowing when to mix and when to match; about knowing which shoes look good with which outfit; about knowing that the difference between looking current and looking like last year's news can be as subtle as whether you zip your coat or button it. This fall, you'll probably want to zip it.The zipper has emerged as the favorite design detail of the season, turning up in usual places as the closure on a bomber jacket, on the side of high boots, as a trouser fly and in not-so-usual ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 7, 1991
Ellen BurchenalWhere: C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St.When: Tuesdays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., through June 29.Call: 539-1080.*Where: School 33 Art Center, 1427 Light St.When: Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., through July 12.Call: 396-4641."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 28, 1995
City-run School 33 Art Center is one of Baltimore's great art assets. Aside from its exhibits program and children's and adult art classes, it has nine spacious, rent-subsidized studios that artists can occupy for up to three years. Every two years there's an exhibit of artists' work, and the one now on display reveals the strength of the current group.There's a good mix here -- abstract and representational, works that stick to one discipline and works that cross boundaries.Jyung Mee Park's stunning "Interstices" looks like a painting, but it's actually an abstract drawing of white ink lines on three transparent nylon gossamer panels that reach from floor to ceiling.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | August 13, 1994
It's hard to know exactly where James von Minor is just now, judging from the show of his work that opens at Gomez today.Von Minor creates painted three-dimensional wall pieces made of wood and occasionally other materials such as lead or concrete. A few years ago these pieces were complex, involving more than one level of construction and several colors of paint. While abstract, they slightly recalled Matisse in their colors and elegance of statement.Since then, von Minor has simplified his work considerably -- to relatively simple shapes painted mainly in one or two colors.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry and Charles Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 4, 2001
The chef's toque is one of the few remaining articles of clothing unique to a particular profession. In Western countries, cooks sometimes wear them even in quite humble eateries, and they're de rigueur in ambitious restaurant kitchens around the world. To explain its unique tall shape, it's said that the toque was inspired by the hats worn by the cooks at 6th-century Greek monasteries or perhaps by monks fleeing the Turkish conquest of Greece in the 15th century. This is highly unlikely, because the familiar shape really dates from the end of the 18th century.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
At first glance, Deborah Claxton's work appears to be simpler than it is. Claxton, a Glenelg artist, has developed an innovative form of art known as "paper painting." Painstakingly cutting and attaching brightly colored pieces of paper onto a canvas, Claxton creates pictures that are striking and unusual. Using a magnifying lamp, Claxton attaches tiny pieces of colored paper that have been cut exactly to specifications. The large piece of acid-free watercolor board she uses as a canvas contains hundreds of numbers that correspond to the shape and color of the paper she must place there, initially giving it the appearance of a huge paint-by-number set. "People are just blown away because it is so unbelievably unique," said Kristine Woodward, owner of the Woodward Gallery in New York, which represents Claxton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and For The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In August 2006, Millennial Media -- a digital advertising company founded in Baltimore just two months prior -- made a move that shaped its future. The company's three co-founders took up office space inside the Emerging Technology Center (ETC), an incubator of startup technology companies that opened its doors in the Signature Building of the Can Company complex in Canton in 1999. Two years later, when Millennial Media moved out of the ETC and into the complex's adjacent Factory Building in October 2008, it was a company of 85 full-time employees.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Kyle Juszczyk trudged off the Ravens' practice field as a rookie fullback a year ago, thoroughly frustrated after a training camp blocking drill in which he was stonewalled repeatedly by linebackers and safeties. In the middle of Juszczyk's unconvincing audition as an inexperienced lead blocker, veteran rush linebacker Terrell Suggs shouted that Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome needed to bring back Pro Bowl fullback Vonta Leach. Three days later, Leach was signed to return as the Ravens' starting fullback.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
For a decade in the NFL, fullback Vonta Leach built a reputation as of the most intimidating lead blockers in the game by delivering punishing hits that rattled linebackers' heads. Leach displayed uncommon pop as a blocker and was able to regularly jolt defenders out of the way with his superior strength and leverage. Now, the former Ravens and Houston Texans All-Pro fullback is a free agent hoping to play another year or two in the NFL after being cut by the Ravens in February.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun and By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
The Ravens had been relatively fortunate on the injury front early in training camp, but their outlook - and their options at arguably their deepest position - were altered on one play Wednesday. During an 11-on-11 drill about an hour into practice, a seemingly routine running play left two rookie defensive linemen on the ground and needing help to get up. Second-round draft pick Timmy Jernigan ultimately walked gingerly toward the locker room with a trainer supporting his back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
What remarkable lives they led. The five men, who hailed mostly from the pinnacle of French aristocracy, were liberals who threw off their own privileges to build a more equitable society. Individually, they danced with Marie Antoinette, fled the guillotine, spied for their country and played a role in a slave revolt in Haiti. All five relocated to Philadelphia, and in just a handful of years managed to exert a lasting impact on the fledgling United States of America. Francois Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, follows the exiles on their American adventures in his new book, "When the United States Spoke French.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's decision to seek $77 million in cuts to a budget that's barely 24 hours old is a sobering reminder that the state's economic recovery is tenuous at best. Maryland experienced no gross domestic product growth last year, and job creation here has been far from steady so far in 2014. Budget Secretary T. Eloise Foster introduced the budget cut proposals today by saying the administration wants to get ahead of any problems now in hopes of providing an extra cushion should revenues go south.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 14, 1997
Melinda Stickney-Gibson's abstract paintings impart a sense of understated emotional narrative.Understated may seem an odd word to describe paintings with colors as bold as the acid, mustardy yellow of "Open's Shadow" and the tense, throbbing red of "A Solitary Instinct." Nor is quietness exactly suggested by her more obvious shapes -- the vaguely face-like green ellipse of "Open's Shadow" or the three angular, insect-like black forms in "The Terms of Exit."Nevertheless, these big paintings at C. Grimaldis Gallery communicate feelings of slow movement, of rumination, of more going on behind the scenes or between the lines than in their overt gestures and foreground pictorial strategies.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | September 1, 1991
While the rest of the art and antiques market is on the rocks, vintage cocktail shakers are making a comeback. They are appearing at antiques shows and shops, and some art deco designs by Russel Wright and Norman Bel Geddes can be seen in museum cases.Fifty years ago no one spoke of stirring a martini so as not to bruise the gin. Gin and vermouth were shaken vigorously over ice, then strained into a cocktail glass and sipped by the likes of Noel Coward, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, William Powell and Myrna Loy."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A hearing examiner recommended the Anne Arundel County school board uphold last year's two-day suspension of a second-grader who was accused of nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun. But an attorney for the family of Joshua Welch said if the county board agrees, he's prepared to take the matter to the state Board of Education. "We're going to do whatever we can to clear this little kid's name and take the brand off his record," attorney Robin Ficker said. Hearing examiner Andrew Nussbaum, who was brought in by the school system to hear the case, sided with school officials in the sanctioning of Welch, then a 7-year-old Park Elementary School student whose suspension in March 2013 drew national media coverage and debate.
NEWS
By Em Powers Hunter | June 12, 2014
It has taken me almost 50 years to realize a very basic concept: I should be grateful for my body and not despise it. Yet there are times like the beginning of summer and swimsuit season where I struggle for rationality. My body has, after all, carried me around faithfully for almost half a century. It has fought off infections, borne me up through fatigue, stress and trials. It has brought four healthy boys into the world and nursed them with vital nutrition, and it has supported me as I faced the challenges of being a working mom. Like most women, I understand that hating my body isn't right.
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