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Shannon Faulkner

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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 5, 1994
Boston. -- It is safe to say that the people driving around South Carolina with those bumper stickers were not her allies. ''Shave Shannon'' was not the rallying cry of the Shannon Faulkner Support Society.They didn't pretend that the shearing of this young woman's hair would be a rite of passage into the corps of cadets. They didn't pretend that a badge of baldness would make her welcome as a full member of the Citadel ranks.Shannon Faulkner's opponents -- and there are lots of them -- favored shaving as proper punishment, as humiliation, as harassment, for the woman who dared to breach the true last bastion of all-male state-supported military schools.
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NEWS
September 15, 1995
Routine TestsTo read and hear that Sen. Paul Sarbanes had his prostate cancer diagnosed early due to a "routine" blood test is a tribute to the miracles of modern medicine and research, which our government is slowly illuminating by cutting grants to carry on much needed research.I personally wish Mr. Sarbanes a long and healthly life. I do note, however, the rather special health benefits afforded to members of Congress, and to those who can afford a private health care plan, that allows "routine" tests as part of its program.
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NEWS
August 23, 1995
Even those who want The Citadel to remain all-male must have felt a twinge of sadness for Shannon Faulkner after she failed to stick it out there. Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, a professor who designed alternative study programs for women in South Carolina and Virginia that have been offered as justifications to keep The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute all-male, said, "While I'm on the opposite side legally, I ache for her personally."Legally, the battle still goes on. The Supreme Court is expected to agree this fall to decide if The Citadel and VMI may continue to exclude women.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 30, 1995
The gray-haired Chicago man's memory was jogged by Shannon Faulkner's miserable experience at the Citadel, the military college in South Carolina.Like Faulkner, he had once gone through the misery of being a freshman cadet at a military school.It was a high school, not a college, but it was based on the same principle: Newcomers were treated like dirt by upperclassmen.Like Faulkner, he was eager and excited in the beginning. He looked forward to the challenge. And, like Faulkner, he had to deal with being different.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 30, 1995
The gray-haired Chicago man's memory was jogged by Shannon Faulkner's miserable experience at the Citadel, the military college in South Carolina.Like Faulkner, he had once gone through the misery of being a freshman cadet at a military school.It was a high school, not a college, but it was based on the same principle: Newcomers were treated like dirt by upperclassmen.Like Faulkner, he was eager and excited in the beginning. He looked forward to the challenge. And, like Faulkner, he had to deal with being different.
NEWS
August 28, 1995
Repulsive Citadel CadetsI feel bad for Shannon Faulkner. She was just an inexperienced, young person who was misguided by her parents, her lawyers and the courts. They took no thought whatsoever for her health and they made her look foolish.Jack RoyceEdgewoodWe worry these days about obscenity on the Internet. Yet the Associated Press photo of cadets rejoicing at Shannon Faulkner's withdrawal from The Citadel strikes me as obscenity (defined as repulsive or offensive) a lot closer to home.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 27, 1994
A T-shirt on campus compares The Citadel cadets to the spotted owls. It calls them both ''Endangered Species.'' A button worn in the visitors' gallery of the courtroom makes its own point. It reads: ''Save the Males.''The Citadel -- along with the Virginia Military Institute -- is literally the last bastion of the all-male public military colleges. It's a bastion under siege by a young woman named Shannon Faulkner, who wants to join the cadet corps and thinks she has the Constitution on her side.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 21, 1994
The Citadel was a great idea 150 years ago -- a military school situated down South Carolina way, in case a Civil War might break out.It was all male, of course. Pretty much all the colleges were. Besides, if Scarlett O'Hara had wanted to attend college, she wasn't going anywhere that required double-time marching.Times have changed. The Citadel, a center of antediluvian thought, had not. Until yesterday.It was yesterday, on her 19th birthday, that Shannon Faulkner walked, maybe in double time, through the hallowed halls and headed to class -- a Supreme Court ruling in her hip pocket -- to become The Citadel's first woman student.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Shannon Faulkner's attorneys asked the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to reject a last-ditch effort by the Citadel to keep her out of the corps of cadets, accusing the school of "unethical" behavior.In a 30-page reply to a legal action submitted to the Supreme Court the day before, Ms. Faulkner's attorneys used tough language against the Citadel and its prime ally, the state of South Carolina."The notion that one woman will single-handedly destroy the Citadel is ludicrous," Ms. Faulkner's attorney, Val Vojdik, said in papers filed with the court.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 28, 1995
The most astonishing thing about the Shannon Faulkner case is that, according to the lawyers, there are at least two otherwomen willing to fill the breach.This can't be right, can it?It's bad enough to risk the hardships of desegregating the Citadel. But how about the risk of being the next Shannon Faulkner, who, if I understand her critics, should be shunned for her failure or possibly just horsewhipped?I mean, she quit, didn't she?As a symbol of womanhood, she was a clear loser. Not only was she out of shape (a nice way of saying overweight)
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 28, 1995
The most astonishing thing about the Shannon Faulkner case is that, according to the lawyers, there are at least two otherwomen willing to fill the breach.This can't be right, can it?It's bad enough to risk the hardships of desegregating the Citadel. But how about the risk of being the next Shannon Faulkner, who, if I understand her critics, should be shunned for her failure or possibly just horsewhipped?I mean, she quit, didn't she?As a symbol of womanhood, she was a clear loser. Not only was she out of shape (a nice way of saying overweight)
NEWS
August 28, 1995
Repulsive Citadel CadetsI feel bad for Shannon Faulkner. She was just an inexperienced, young person who was misguided by her parents, her lawyers and the courts. They took no thought whatsoever for her health and they made her look foolish.Jack RoyceEdgewoodWe worry these days about obscenity on the Internet. Yet the Associated Press photo of cadets rejoicing at Shannon Faulkner's withdrawal from The Citadel strikes me as obscenity (defined as repulsive or offensive) a lot closer to home.
NEWS
By E.J. Montini | August 24, 1995
ATTEN-HUT. I WANT all squishy-headed, non-conformist, bleeding-heart, left-wing, renegade, socialist, pinko, revolutionary, hippie liberals to listen up.I'm gonna say this one time and one time only.No more whining over Shannon Faulkner.You got that?No more excuses. No more communistic-sounding, psychological explanations or touchy-feely political hooey. Nothing. Stop.The lesson learned from Cadet Faulkner's brief stint at one of our nation's two remaining all-male military academies is clear and irrefutable.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | August 23, 1995
Washington. -- After the politics, the escort by federal marshals, the legal expenses (including aid from the Justice Department) and the court orders, Shannon Faulkner could not perform well enough to pass The Citadel's physical-training requirements, which had been lowered just for her.In announcing her decision to leave The Citadel after spending ''hell week'' in the infirmary, Ms. Faulkner blamed ''the stress of the past two-and-a-half-year legal battle,...
NEWS
August 23, 1995
Even those who want The Citadel to remain all-male must have felt a twinge of sadness for Shannon Faulkner after she failed to stick it out there. Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, a professor who designed alternative study programs for women in South Carolina and Virginia that have been offered as justifications to keep The Citadel and Virginia Military Institute all-male, said, "While I'm on the opposite side legally, I ache for her personally."Legally, the battle still goes on. The Supreme Court is expected to agree this fall to decide if The Citadel and VMI may continue to exclude women.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Shannon Faulkner's attorneys asked the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to reject a last-ditch effort by the Citadel to keep her out of the corps of cadets, accusing the school of "unethical" behavior.In a 30-page reply to a legal action submitted to the Supreme Court the day before, Ms. Faulkner's attorneys used tough language against the Citadel and its prime ally, the state of South Carolina."The notion that one woman will single-handedly destroy the Citadel is ludicrous," Ms. Faulkner's attorney, Val Vojdik, said in papers filed with the court.
NEWS
By E.J. Montini | August 24, 1995
ATTEN-HUT. I WANT all squishy-headed, non-conformist, bleeding-heart, left-wing, renegade, socialist, pinko, revolutionary, hippie liberals to listen up.I'm gonna say this one time and one time only.No more whining over Shannon Faulkner.You got that?No more excuses. No more communistic-sounding, psychological explanations or touchy-feely political hooey. Nothing. Stop.The lesson learned from Cadet Faulkner's brief stint at one of our nation's two remaining all-male military academies is clear and irrefutable.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | August 23, 1995
Washington. -- After the politics, the escort by federal marshals, the legal expenses (including aid from the Justice Department) and the court orders, Shannon Faulkner could not perform well enough to pass The Citadel's physical-training requirements, which had been lowered just for her.In announcing her decision to leave The Citadel after spending ''hell week'' in the infirmary, Ms. Faulkner blamed ''the stress of the past two-and-a-half-year legal battle,...
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 29, 1994
As a male person of the '90s, I find myself troubled. And it's all because of the Wonderbra, which is not to be confused with Wonder Woman, who doesn't need one.The Wonderbra is the new-fangled device that creates cleavage for the cleavage challenged. Maybe cleavage doesn't take it far enough. The Wonderbra gives a woman cleavage in much the way that erosion gave Arizona the Grand Canyon.Yes, it molds and shapes and pushes up, up, up. It's the Apollo missile of bras. It's got more wires than Bell Atlantic, and, if you trust the publicity, is the greatest scientific advance since cable TV.Here's what all the fuss is about: The Wonderbra is supposed to make Kate Moss look like Dolly Parton.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 11, 1994
JUST WHEN it looked as if Los Angeles had cinched the national nuttiness championship, along comes dear old Dixie titillating American lust for the clownish with an uproar about whether a female skull may be shaved bare as a brass doorknob.Naturally, a judge has already had to intervene. Where would American farce be without the courts? If he had had a firmer grasp on the American character Stephen Sondheim would have titled his famous ballad "Send In the Judges."With this latest sensation, silliness connoisseurs who lie awake wondering if O.J. Simpson can get a fair trial with only $10 million to spend on lawyers now face the dawn wondering if Shannon Faulkner can get a fair haircut.
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